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Article
Publication date: 13 June 2008

Mark Renshaw, Craig Vaughan, Mel Ottewill, Alan Ireland and Jane Carmody

The aim of this paper is to generate a debate regarding the value of incident reporting in the UK.

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Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to generate a debate regarding the value of incident reporting in the UK.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper critiques the dominant approach to patients in the UK.

Findings

It is suggested that the reliability of health care processes would need to substantially improve before an incident reporting system can have a meaningful impact on patient safety.

Practical implications

Greater benefits in patient safety will be accrued by focusing resources on designing reliable processes rather than the extension of incident reporting.

Originality/value

This paper offers a local perspective on a potentially flawed national strategy.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 21 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1994

C.A. Long and P.G. Tucker

A heated rotating cavity with an axial throughflow of cooling air isused as a model for the flow in the cylindrical cavities between adjacentdiscs of a high‐pressure…

Abstract

A heated rotating cavity with an axial throughflow of cooling air is used as a model for the flow in the cylindrical cavities between adjacent discs of a high‐pressure gas‐turbine compressor. In an engine the flow is expected to be turbulent, the limitations of this laminar study are fully realised but it is considered an essential step to understand the fundamental nature of the flow. The three‐dimensional, time‐dependent governing equations are solved using a code based on the finite volume technique and a multigrid algorithm. The computed flow structure shows that flow enters the cavity in one or more radial arms and then forms regions of cyclonic and anticyclonic circulation. This basic flow structure is consistent with existing experimental evidence obtained from flow visualization. The flow structure also undergoes cyclic changes with time. For example, a single radial arm, and pair of recirculation regions can commute to two radial arms and two pairs of recirculation regions and then revert back to one. The flow structure inside the cavity is found to be heavily influenced by the radial distribution of surface temperature imposed on the discs. As the radial location of the maximum disc temperature moves radially outward, this appears to increase the number of radial arms and pairs of recirculation regions (from one to three for the distributions considered here). If the peripheral shroud is also heated there appear to be many radial arms which exchange fluid with a strong cyclonic flow adjacent to the shroud. One surface temperature distribution is studied in detail and profiles of the relative tangential and radial velocities are presented. The disc heat transfer is also found to be influenced by the disc surface temperature distribution. It is also found that the computed Nusselt numbers are in reasonable accord over most of the disc surface with a correlation found from previous experimental measurements.

Details

International Journal of Numerical Methods for Heat & Fluid Flow, vol. 4 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0961-5539

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 7 December 2006

Eugene A. Rosa

Long-term stewardship (LTS), the caretaking of hazardous materials, is one of the main unanticipated challenges of high modernity. LTS refers to the process of protecting…

Abstract

Long-term stewardship (LTS), the caretaking of hazardous materials, is one of the main unanticipated challenges of high modernity. LTS refers to the process of protecting public health and the environment through the effective management of systems or materials over multiple generations, in some cases over many many generations. It arises from the recent realization that the full remediation of contaminated waste sites is beyond scientific knowledge, best technologies, or available resources.1 Some materials will demand care and risk management over several generations while others, such as high-level nuclear waste, will require a succession of generations that exceeds the longevity of any civilization known to history.

Details

Long-Term Management of Contaminated Sites
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-419-5

Article
Publication date: 15 December 2017

Shona Robinson-Edwards and Craig Pinkney

The purpose of this paper is to explore the experiences of Ibrahim, an ex-offender who has embraced Islam. Ibrahim professes Islam to be the influential element to his…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the experiences of Ibrahim, an ex-offender who has embraced Islam. Ibrahim professes Islam to be the influential element to his desistance process. This study explores Ibrahim’s journey, emphasising and reflecting upon youth; criminality and religiosity. Much of the current research relating to Black men and offending is limited to masculinity, father absence, gangs and criminality. The role of religiosity in the lives of offenders and/or ex-offenders is often overlooked. The authors suggest that identity, religiosity and desistance can raise a host of complexities while highlighting the unique challenges and benefits experienced by Ibrahim, following the practice of religion.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper took a qualitative, ethnographic approach, in the form of analysing and exploring Ibrahim’s personal lived experience. The analysis of semi-structured interviews, and reflective diaries, utilising grounded theory allowed the formation of the following three core themes: desistance, religion and identity.

Findings

The findings within this paper identify an interlink between desistance, religion and identity. The role of religiosity is becoming increasingly more important in academic social science research. This paper highlights the complexities of all three above intersections.

Research limitations/implications

This paper explores the complexities of religiosity in the desistance process of Ibrahim. Research in relation to former gang members in the UK and the role of religiosity in their lives is fairly under-researched. This paper seeks to build on existing research surrounding gang, further exploring religiosity from a UK context.

Practical implications

Time spent with Ibrahim had to be tightly scheduled, due to the work commitments of both Ibrahim and the researcher. Therefore, planning had to be done ahead in an efficient manner.

Social implications

Researching the way individuals experience the world is a “growing phenomenon”. This paper aimed to explore the lived experience of religiosity from the perspective of Ibrahim. However, it was important to not stereotype and label all Black males who have embraced Islam and desisted from crime. Therefore, this paper’s intention is not to stereotype Black men, but to raise awareness and encourage further discussion surrounding the role of religiosity in the lives of ex-offenders’.

Originality/value

To the authors’ knowledge, studies specifically focusing on the role of Islam in the life of an ex-offender are few and far between. Therefore, findings from this study are important to develop further understanding surrounding religiosity, offending and desistance. This study explores the lived experiences of Ibrahim, an former gang member and ex-offender who professes Islam to be a fundamental source to his desistance process.

Details

Safer Communities, vol. 17 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-8043

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 7 June 2019

Jennifer J. Kish-Gephart, Linda Klebe Treviño, Anjier Chen and Jacqueline Tilton

The field of behavioral business ethics has come a long way since its inception nearly five decades ago. Pioneered in part in response to a number of high-profile…

Abstract

The field of behavioral business ethics has come a long way since its inception nearly five decades ago. Pioneered in part in response to a number of high-profile corporate scandals, the early field of business ethics was thought by many to be a fad that would recede along with the salience of the scandals of the day. Yet, this could not have been further from the truth. The need for behavioral business ethics research remains ever-present, as evidenced by the sustained number of scandals and unethical behavior within and by organizations. Moreover, research in this area has burgeoned. In the 1980s, only 54 articles had been published on this topic (Tenbrunsel & Smith-Crowe, 2008); today, a similar search yields over 3,000 “hits.” In light of the area’s growth, we suggest the need to take a look back at the seminal work that sparked social scientific work in the field. In particular, this chapter has two main objectives. First, we provide a review of select foundational work. In so doing, we identify some of the key trends that characterized early knowledge development in the field. Second, we draw on this historical context to consider how past trends relate to current work and speak to future research opportunities.

Book part
Publication date: 14 October 2019

Petranka Kelly, Jennifer Lawlor and Michael Mulvey

Purpose: The development of service automation continues to underpin the travel, tourism and hospitality sectors providing benefits for both customers and service…

Abstract

Purpose: The development of service automation continues to underpin the travel, tourism and hospitality sectors providing benefits for both customers and service companies. The purpose of this chapter is to showcase the practice of self-service technology (SST) usage in the contemporary tourism and hospitality sectors and present a conceptual framework of customer SST adoption.

Design/Methodology/Approach: This chapter offers an examination of theory, research and practice in relation to SST usage in tourism, highlighting the benefits and drawbacks arising for both customers and service providers. Since the benefits are achieved only if SSTs gain effective adoption with customers, this chapter focuses on concepts underpinning the study of customer SST adoption. Drawing on SST adoption factors and SST customer roles, a conceptual framework of SST adoption is discussed.

Findings/Practical Implications: This chapter examines the principles and practice underpinning the usage of self-service technologies in the travel, tourism and hospitality sectors, with specific reference to customer SST roles in co-creation. The customer SST roles provide a more detailed and nuanced picture of the customer perspective on SST usage. These nuanced roles are captured in a conceptual framework which seeks to further refine the understanding of customer SST adoption.

Research Implications & Originality/Value: The framework provides a useful foundation for further research with a focus on customer empowerment in SSTs. The future development of service automation will require a balance between the delivery of a personalised and smarter customer experience and technology applications that are unobtrusive and which do not pose any ethical or privacy concerns.

Details

Robots, Artificial Intelligence, and Service Automation in Travel, Tourism and Hospitality
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-688-0

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 7 July 2017

Abstract

Details

Knowledge Transfer to and within Tourism
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-405-7

Article
Publication date: 25 January 2019

Craig Allen Talmage, Jocelyn Bell and Gheorghe Dragomir

This paper aims to extend social entrepreneurship theory by investigating the darker sides of innovation and enterprise. Entrepreneurship and social entrepreneurship…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to extend social entrepreneurship theory by investigating the darker sides of innovation and enterprise. Entrepreneurship and social entrepreneurship theories regarding shifting equilibriums are considered alongside other traditions. This research presents how individuals see enterprises as dark and light and discusses how such perceptions are important to building emerging theories of light and dark social entrepreneurship.

Design/methodology/approach

The study uses a survey of public perceptions (n = 631) regarding the social and economic impact of a total of 15 different enterprises to create a map of the darker variations of enterprises. An 11-point scale was used to evaluate perceived impact.

Findings

The mapping of each enterprise on a coordinate plane resulted in four thematic areas: traditional enterprises (light social, light economic), taboo enterprises (dark social, light economic), dark enterprises (dark social, dark economic) and alternative enterprises (light social, dark economic). Some enterprises crossed between the thematic areas.

Research limitations/implications

This study opens up new directions for research on dark social entrepreneurship and research on enterprises that influence social equilibriums.

Practical implications

This study provides guidance for practitioners and policymakers to better understand phenomena such as dark, taboo and alternative enterprises and their nuances.

Social implications

This study allows for a broader look at social entrepreneurship, innovation and enterprise to better understand dark and light nuances. Similarities between the lighter and darker forms of enterprises are noted.

Originality/value

This study builds on dark entrepreneurship and dark social entrepreneurship theories and concepts using empirical methods.

Details

Social Enterprise Journal, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-8614

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 2005

Linda Berube

Aims to present a background to the use of electronic resources, especially e‐books, in public libraries, which appears to threaten some basic activities that define a…

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Abstract

Purpose

Aims to present a background to the use of electronic resources, especially e‐books, in public libraries, which appears to threaten some basic activities that define a reading culture dependent on the print book.

Design/methodology/approach

There are initiatives afoot which are working to integrate e‐books into the culture and process of resource‐sharing. This paper reviews some of the issues with e‐books, and specifically how the Co‐East partnership proposes to contribute to the initiatives concerned with improving accessibility.

Findings

It is important that public libraries do take that first step in implementing an e‐books service and take care in its promotion. Their traditional role, after all, is providing the bridge between rights holders and the public and, with the advent of “disruptive technology”, this role is more crucial than ever.

Originality/value

An important precedent for this project has been the findings from the Essex e‐books project, and especially user feedback. Although no one was asking about e‐books, users from all age groups were curious enough to participate in the project, and forthcoming in offering their opinion, much of it positive, about the reading experience and the mobile technology.

Details

Interlending & Document Supply, vol. 33 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-1615

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 9 September 2014

Craig Henry

237

Abstract

Details

Strategy & Leadership, vol. 42 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1087-8572

1 – 10 of 94