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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2018

Neal Baker, Katherine Furlong, David Consiglio, Gentry Lankewicz Holbert, Craig Milberg, Kevin Reynolds and Joshua Wilson

The purpose of this paper is twofold. It first examines cross-institutional benchmark data about “library as place” from 99 US schools in the Measuring Information Service…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is twofold. It first examines cross-institutional benchmark data about “library as place” from 99 US schools in the Measuring Information Service Outcomes (MISO) Survey (www.misosurvey.org). The data demonstrate the value of “library as place” to students in particular. Second, the paper shares case studies of how two college libraries made MISO Survey “library as place” data actionable. Lafayette College (Easton, Pennsylvania) analyzed local MISO Survey data after a renovation to validate return on investment. Earlham College (Richmond, Indiana) analyzed MISO Survey data to help secure a science library renovation and to justify an architectural study for its main library.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper begins with an analysis of “library as place” using aggregate benchmarks derived from US college and university respondents between 2012 and 2015. Specifically, the paper contrasts student and faculty perceptions of “library as place” via national benchmarks about: library services importance, satisfaction, and use (three benchmarks); hybrid online/“place-based” library services importance, satisfaction, and use (three benchmarks). Pivoting from higher education to individual, local perspectives, two case studies reveal how academic libraries used MISO Survey findings to demonstrate the value of “library as place” for renovation purposes.

Findings

The findings include that undergraduates make more frequent use than faculty of place-based services such as reference, equipment loans, and physical course reserves. Undergraduates also find most of these services more important than faculty do. Faculty makes generally more frequent use than undergraduates of online services such as library databases and the catalog. They find that these services to be more important than undergraduates do. Faculty and undergraduates use newer library discovery systems with equal frequency and find them to be equally important. Undergraduates find comfortable library spaces to be very important, and faculty considers them to be only a bit less important.

Originality/value

This is the first paper using MISO Survey data to focus on the importance and satisfaction of place-based library services involving cross-institutional comparisons for students and faculty. Previously published research using MISO Survey data have compared the use of place-based library services. This is also the first paper to offer case studies about how institutions use MISO Survey data to demonstrate the value of “library as place.”

Details

Performance Measurement and Metrics, vol. 19 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-8047

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 25 September 2017

Patrick Nunn and Roselyn Kumar

Climate change poses diverse, often fundamental, challenges to livelihoods of island peoples. The purpose of this study is to demonstrate that these challenges must be…

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4973

Abstract

Purpose

Climate change poses diverse, often fundamental, challenges to livelihoods of island peoples. The purpose of this study is to demonstrate that these challenges must be better understood before effective and sustainable adaptation is possible.

Design/methodology/approach

Understanding past livelihood impacts from climate change can help design and operationalize future interventions. In addition, globalization has had uneven effects on island countries/jurisdictions, producing situations especially in archipelagoes where there are significant differences between core and peripheral communities. This approach overcomes the problems that have characterized many recent interventions for climate-change adaptation in island contexts which have resulted in uneven and at best only marginal livelihood improvements in preparedness for future climate change.

Findings

Island contexts have a range of unique vulnerability and resilience characteristics that help explain recent and proposed responses to climate change. These include the sensitivity of coastal fringes to climate-environmental changes: and in island societies, the comparatively high degrees of social coherence, closeness to nature and spirituality that are uncommon in western contexts.

Research limitations/implications

Enhanced understanding of island environmental and social contexts, as well as insights from past climate impacts and peripherality, all contribute to more effective and sustainable future interventions for adaptation.

Originality/value

The need for more effective and sustainable adaptation in island contexts is becoming ever more exigent as the pace of twenty-first-century climate change increases.

Details

International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-8692

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 27 June 2016

Diane M. Martin and Terhi Väistö

The purpose of this paper is to re-evaluate the sustainable attitude-behavior gap by reconsidering the cognitive-rational aspects of consumer purchase behavior. We aim to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to re-evaluate the sustainable attitude-behavior gap by reconsidering the cognitive-rational aspects of consumer purchase behavior. We aim to show how companies can benefit from focusing on hedonic aspects of consumption in their marketing of sustainable products. We claim that consumer culture research needs to examine the link between hedonic, aesthetic, and cognitive-rational aspects of sustainable consumption.

Methodology/approach

We use the electric vehicle marketing strategy in the United States as an example of an approach to bridge the attitude-behavior gap. More specifically, we focus on the car manufacturer Tesla as an example of marketing a sustainable product.

Findings

We find that Tesla’s marketing strategy focuses on aesthetics and hedonics-ludic performance. Similarly to other luxury cars, Tesla markets itself with a full compliment of consumer benefits. Compared to economical electric vehicles, sustainability is not the primary focus of Tesla’s marketing communication strategy.

Research limitations/implications

Sustainable consumption theory benefits from examining the interlinking of hedonic, aesthetic and cognitive-rational aspects product purchasing and use. Future research in the development of sustainable consumption theory in additional complex product categories is needed.

Practical implications

Greater regard for consumer experience in sustainable consumption offers the potential for additional strategies to bridge the attitude-behavior gap and marketing of sustainable goods.

Originality/value

We move beyond the attitude-behavior gap by not only focusing on expressed attitudes of sustainability, but also focusing on the hedonic aspects at play in sustainable consumption.

Details

Marketing in and for a Sustainable Society
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-282-8

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 27 September 2011

Aneela Akram, Dwight Merunka and Muhammad Shakaib Akram

The purpose of the paper is to study the impact of perceived brand globalness (PBG) on consumers' purchase intention (PI) and the mediating role of perceived brand quality…

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3681

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the paper is to study the impact of perceived brand globalness (PBG) on consumers' purchase intention (PI) and the mediating role of perceived brand quality (PBQ) and perceived brand prestige (PBP) in this relation, among consumers in emergent markets. The paper also investigate the moderating role of consumer ethnocentrism (CE) on the relation between PBG and both PBQ and PBP.

Design/methodology/approach

A web‐based survey was conducted in an emerging market (Pakistan) using both global and local brands. The model was tested using structural equation modeling.

Findings

PBG positively impacts both PBQ and PBP while PBQ appears to be a stronger mediator than PBP. The moderating role of CE between PBG and PBQ and between PBG and PBP has been demonstrated; the weaker the CE the stronger the relationships.

Research limitations/implications

A convenience sample was used and caution must be taken when generalizing findings from this study. Managers of global brands must meet consumers' expectations in terms of the quality of their brands and may highlight the prestige associated to them. Low ethnocentric consumers favor global brands, rendering this segment attractive for the managers of global brands.

Originality/value

The paper extends previous work on the role of brand globalness by focusing on an emergent market where the choice problem between local and global brands is acute and by demonstrating the moderating role of CE.

Details

International Journal of Emerging Markets, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-8809

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2001

Vanishree Rudraswamy and David A. Vance

Information privacy is currently regarded as one of the key ethical issues of the information age. Rapid technological developments and the advent of Internet based…

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1659

Abstract

Information privacy is currently regarded as one of the key ethical issues of the information age. Rapid technological developments and the advent of Internet based commerce or electronic commerce (e‐commerce) have forced several nations of the world to enact legislation to protect the information privacy of their citizens and corporations. Transborder data flows (TBDFs) have been known to have a significant impact on multinational and transnational corporations with respect to international data transfers. This paper discusses the issues and implications of TBDFs and provides a comparative account of the privacy laws on individual data protection in different countries. Also proposed is a theoretical model relating to diffusion of social policies of use with respect to the adoption and diffusion of privacy laws by different nations of the world in a global e‐commerce environment.

Details

Logistics Information Management, vol. 14 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-6053

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 25 January 2013

Isabel Buil, Eva Martínez and Leslie de Chernatony

The purpose of this paper is to propose and test a model to better understand brand equity. It seeks to investigate the effects of this construct on consumers '…

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20474

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to propose and test a model to better understand brand equity. It seeks to investigate the effects of this construct on consumers ' responses using data from two European countries.

Design/methodology/approach

Hypotheses were tested using structural equation modeling (SEM). Measurement invariance and stability of the model across the two national samples was assessed using multigroup confirmatory factor analysis.

Findings

Results indicate that brand equity dimensions inter-relate. Brand awareness positively impacts perceived quality and brand associations. Brand loyalty is mainly influenced by brand associations. Finally, perceived quality, brand associations and brand loyalty are the main drivers of overall brand equity. Findings also corroborate the positive impact of brand equity on consumers ' responses. In addition, the general framework proposed is found to be empirically robust across the studied countries. Only a few differences are observed.

Research limitations/implications

A limited set of product categories, brands and countries were used.

Practical implications

Findings provide useful guidelines for brand equity management. Managers can complement financial metrics with consumer-based brand equity measures to track brand performance over time and to benchmark against other brands. Building brand equity generates more value for corporations since a more favourable consumer response results from positive brand equity.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the scarce international brand equity literature by testing the proposed model using data from a sample of consumers in two European countries. It also enriches the brand equity literature by empirically examining the relationships among consumer-based brand equity dimensions and its effects on consumers ' responses.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 30 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 4 February 2011

Abstract

Details

Contributions to Economic Analysis
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-721-6

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Article
Publication date: 2 September 2014

Andreas Strebinger

This study aims to compare academic prescriptive models on how to choose a branding strategy on the continuum from a “branded house” to a “house of brands” with real-life…

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8320

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to compare academic prescriptive models on how to choose a branding strategy on the continuum from a “branded house” to a “house of brands” with real-life branding strategies of leading companies.

Design/methodology/approach

Data from an executive survey, observations and desk research on 75 leading companies in Austria are analysed with multilevel weighted least squares (WLS) regression.

Findings

Branding strategies for products are determined by industry (23 per cent of variance), the overall strategy of the company (28 per cent), the remaining variance being product-level decisions deviating from both. Service and consumer durables companies lean more towards corporate branding than consumer nondurables. On the company level, synergies in advertising, e-commerce and e-CRM (customer-relationship management) increase the usage of shared brands. A higher company age leads to brand proliferation. On the product level, quality differences between products, the emphasis on and differences in experiential product positioning and, marginally, the symbolic differences between products favour individual brands.

Research limitations/implications

Future research should investigate additional markets, additional drivers, small and medium-sized entreprises (SMEs) and employ additional measures.

Practical implications

The study informs brand-architecture audits with benchmarks from leading companies, calls for a view of brand architecture more flexible than ideal-type categories proposed in literature and cautions against management inertia, industry standards and trends in designing branding strategies.

Originality/value

This study is the first quantitative cross-industry multi-level study on real-life branding strategies. It also applies a new conceptualisation and measurement of branding strategy.

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Article
Publication date: 5 October 2018

Ali Padyab and Anna Ståhlbröst

The integration of internet of things (IoT) devices into daily life introduces challenges for the privacy of their users and those who are affected by these devices. This…

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1085

Abstract

Purpose

The integration of internet of things (IoT) devices into daily life introduces challenges for the privacy of their users and those who are affected by these devices. This paper explores the factors that affect individual concerns regarding IoT use and how those factors affect the dynamics of privacy management with the presence of an IoT device.

Design/methodology/approach

Four focus groups of individuals and IoT experts were studied to understand the groups’ privacy concerns. The authors adopted a qualitative research method based on grounded theory to find relevant dimensions of situational privacy concerns in IoT use situations.

Findings

The results revealed that fourteen dimensions of individuals’ privacy concerns regarding the IoT are relevant and can be categorized under four key influential factors: collection, IoT device, collected data storage and use of collected data. The authors also analyzed the focus groups using genres of disclosure theory and explored how privacy concerns affect individual privacy management regulations.

Research limitations/implications

This paper contributes to how future research can employ genres of disclosure as a theoretical framework to identify situations where privacy violations occur.

Practical implications

This study can assist service providers and IoT manufacturers in deriving design principles and decreasing concerns by addressing the information that must be communicated to their users.

Originality/value

As opposed to the previous research, which was more inclined to dispositional privacy concerns, this study provides insights into situational privacy concerns when individuals are confronted with the IoT. This study represents the first attempt to investigate the process individuals experience in managing their privacy.

Details

Digital Policy, Regulation and Governance, vol. 20 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-5038

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 18 July 2008

Yu Henry Xie

This paper attempts to examine the relationship between consumer innovativeness and consumers' acceptance of brand extensions.

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6881

Abstract

Purpose

This paper attempts to examine the relationship between consumer innovativeness and consumers' acceptance of brand extensions.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a conceptual paper that builds upon the extant literature of consumer innovativeness and brand extensions. A number of research propositions are developed in this thought‐provoking work.

Findings

It is proposed that consumer innovativeness exerts considerable influence on consumers' acceptance of brand extensions when extension distance and types of extensions are examined. In addition, product information availability and interpersonal communication/influence (i.e. informative and normative) moderate the relationship between consumer innovativeness and consumers' acceptance of brand extensions.

Research limitations/implications

This study can help marketers develop appropriate and effective marketing strategies to influence consumers' acceptance of brand extensions. This study serves to provide guidance for brand managers and marketers alike in evaluating the potential success of their extended brands. On the other hand, the paper draws from the extant literature and theoretical discussion to develop research propositions. This approach might limit its depth and scope.

Originality/value

As the use of brand extensions intensifies in the marketplace, it is imperative to understand how consumer innovativeness exerts influence on acceptance of brand extensions. This study fills the research void in the literature and contributes to the extant literature by analyzing the relationship between consumer innovativeness and consumers' acceptance of brand extensions.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 17 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

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