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Article
Publication date: 15 March 2013

Craig L. Pearce, Charles C. Manz and Samuel Akanno

The purpose of this paper is to shed some light on the linkage between leadership and sustainability. Recent scandals involving executive leadership have significantly…

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2079

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to shed some light on the linkage between leadership and sustainability. Recent scandals involving executive leadership have significantly contributed to the topic of sustainability becoming one of the most important concerns of the management literature in the twenty‐first century.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors’ approach is to review the extant literature and develop a theoretical model of the connection between leadership, in its many forms, and sustainability.

Findings

Most treatments of sustainability have focused on glorifying top executives for their sustainability efforts or vilifying them for their lack thereof. The authors claim that this perspective is oversimplified and flawed.

Research limitations/implications

The authors develop several readily testable propositions to guide future research.

Practical implications

The practical implications of the authors’ model are focused on the engagement of employees at work: the philosophical perspective espoused in the model is one founded on empowerment and active involvement.

Social implications

The model purports mechanisms through which organizations can develop more robust systems that ultimately can translate into more sustainable organizational practices.

Originality/value

The presented model is original in that the authors propose that broadening management development across all levels of organizations, along the lines of shared leadership theory, will facilitate organizational sustainability.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 32 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2006

Michelle C. Bligh, Craig L. Pearce and Jeffrey C. Kohles

To address the increasing need for novel approaches to leadership that deal with the challenges organizations face as they flatten, diversify, and confront increasingly…

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15870

Abstract

Purpose

To address the increasing need for novel approaches to leadership that deal with the challenges organizations face as they flatten, diversify, and confront increasingly complex problems.

Design/methodology/approach

A meso‐level theoretical model is developed that outlines the relationship between self‐ and shared leadership, focusing on the intermediary processes of trust, potency, and commitment that may lead to the development of shared leadership and ultimately more innovative knowledge creation.

Findings

Nine propositions are developed, addressing the relationships between self‐ and shared leadership, concluding with some of the theoretical and practical implications of the model and specific recommendations for future empirical work in this area.

Research limitations/implications

An important boundary condition of the model is that it assumes team and organizational incentives are in place to encourage team building and the facilitation of team over individual achievements.

Practical implications

Conceptualizing leadership in this way leads to numerous unanswered questions regarding how team dynamics influence, and are influenced by, various forms of leadership (including lateral, upward, and downward influence attempts). Greater dialogue between the team dynamics literature and the leadership literature may lead to new insights into how shared leadership is influenced by a variety of team characteristics, including team ability, size, member maturity, familiarity, likeability, cohesion, etc., all of which are potential areas for future research.

Originality/value

Important research questions that stem from consideration of these two theories in concert will prove critical in understanding the complex interrelationships among self‐leadership, shared leadership, and the creation of new knowledge in today's complex and dynamic organizations.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 21 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2003

Craig L. Pearce, Henry P. Sims, Jonathan F. Cox, Gail Ball, Eugene Schnell, Ken A. Smith and Linda Trevino

Extends the transactional‐transformational model of leadership by deductively developing four theoretical behavioral types of leadership based on a historical analysis of…

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10189

Abstract

Extends the transactional‐transformational model of leadership by deductively developing four theoretical behavioral types of leadership based on a historical analysis of leadership literature. Then, in an exploratory empirical phase, uses two data sets to inductively develop alternative models of leadership types. Finally, with a third data set, tests several theoretically plausible typologies using second‐order confirmatory factor analysis (CFA). The results of the CFA generally support the existence of four leadership types: directive leadership, transactional leadership, transformational leadership, and empowering leadership.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 22 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 1 January 2000

Craig L. Pearce and Henry P. Sims

The fascination with leadership seems an enduring human condition. Numerous theories of leadership have been espoused over the centuries. The primary emphasis of these…

Abstract

The fascination with leadership seems an enduring human condition. Numerous theories of leadership have been espoused over the centuries. The primary emphasis of these theories has been the individual leader. The purpose of this research is to widen the debate on leadership to include, not only individual level leadership, but also to explore the possibilities of `shared leadership' at the group level of analysis and thus suggest movement toward a multi-level theory of leadership.

Details

Advances in Interdisciplinary Studies of Work Teams
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76230-747-0

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Book part
Publication date: 1 January 2000

Abstract

Details

Advances in Interdisciplinary Studies of Work Teams
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76230-747-0

Abstract

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 32 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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Article
Publication date: 7 October 2013

To examine the relationship between leadership and organizational sustainability.

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1122

Abstract

Purpose

To examine the relationship between leadership and organizational sustainability.

Design/methodology/approach

Presents research on the effects of leadership style on follower behavior and the emergence of managerial malfeasance. Contrasts the impact of shared and centralized leadership on organizational sustainability.

Findings

Is the age of heroic leadership coming to an end? Can all those articles interviewing celebrity chief executives and business books about their secrets of successful leadership really be wrong? A recent study argues that this model of centralized, top-down leadership can put the future of the organization at risk. Instead, it advocates selecting and developing the people who will teach others how to lead and suggests that companies that use this approach at every level are the ones most likely to have a sustainable future.

Practical implications

Advocates wider use of management development for shared leadership at all levels of the organization, rather than restricting leadership training to those already in or candidates for leadership positions.

Originality/value

Highlights the need for further theoretical and empirical research into shared leadership in general and its impact on organizational sustainability in particular.

Details

Strategic Direction, vol. 29 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0258-0543

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Content available
Article
Publication date: 7 October 2013

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220

Abstract

Details

Strategic Direction, vol. 29 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0258-0543

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Book part
Publication date: 8 November 2019

Abstract

Details

Delivering Tourism Intelligence
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-810-9

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Book part
Publication date: 24 July 2020

Francis J. Yammarino, Minyoung Cheong, Jayoung Kim and Chou-Yu Tsai

For many of the current leadership theories, models, and approaches, the answer to the question posed in the title, “Is leadership more than ‘I like my boss’?,” is “no,”…

Abstract

For many of the current leadership theories, models, and approaches, the answer to the question posed in the title, “Is leadership more than ‘I like my boss’?,” is “no,” as there appears to be a hierarchy of leadership concepts with Liking of the leader as the primary dimension or general factor foundation. There are then secondary dimensions or specific sub-factors of liking of Relationship Leadership and Task Leadership; and subsequently, tertiary dimensions or actual sub-sub-factors that comprise the numerous leadership views as well as their operationalizations (e.g., via surveys). There are, however, some leadership views that go beyond simply liking of the leader and liking of relationship leadership and task leadership. For these, which involve explicit levels of analysis formulations, often beyond the leader, or are multi-level in nature, the answer to the title question is “yes.” We clarify and discuss these various “no” and “yes” leadership views and implications of our work for future research and personnel and human resources management practice.

Details

Research in Personnel and Human Resources Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-076-1

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