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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2004

Jiju Antony, Craig Fergusson, Steve Warwood and Joanna Hing Yee Tsang

Total Quality Management is an integrative managemetn philosophy aimed at continuously improving the performance of products, processes and services to achieve and surpass…

Abstract

Total Quality Management is an integrative managemetn philosophy aimed at continuously improving the performance of products, processes and services to achieve and surpass customer expectations. Very little has been published on the fundamental difference between manufacturing and service industries with regard to TQM implementation. The purpose of this study is to understand the concept of TQM in both industry sectors and to identify the significant differences (if any) in TQM practices in UK service and manufacturing organizations. The research is based on a pilot survey conducted in both industrial sectors. It was found that five out the eleven management factors are significantly different between manufacturing and service industries. They are top management commitment and recognition, supplier partnership or supplier management, quality systems and policies, communication in company and cultural change. It was also found that “customer focus’ is the most important factor and “supplier partnership/supplier management” is the least important factor for TQM practice in both manufacturing and service industries in the UK.

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Journal of Advances in Management Research, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0972-7981

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2004

Jiju Antony, V. Somasundarum, Craig Fergusson and Pavel Blecharz

Dr Genichi Taguchi is a Japanese engineer and quality consultant who has promoted the use of statistical design of experiments for improving process/product quality at…

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1531

Abstract

Dr Genichi Taguchi is a Japanese engineer and quality consultant who has promoted the use of statistical design of experiments for improving process/product quality at minimal costs. Taguchi has developed a practical and strategic approach for designing quality into products and processes at the product planning, design and development stages, which is often referred to as off‐line quality control. Although many companies in Europe and the USA have used the Taguchi approach to statistical design of experiments with success, very few applications of this method are realised in countries such as the Czech Republic. This paper reports the applications of experimental design advocated by Taguchi in two manufacturing companies in the Czech Republic. The results of the study are stimulating and will lead to wider applications of this methodology for tackling process and quality‐related problems in the Czech Republican industries in the near future.

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International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, vol. 53 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0401

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2004

Jiju Antony and Craig Fergusson

Six Sigma is a disciplined approach to define, measure, analyse, improve and control processes that result in variability and defect reduction. Although Six Sigma has been…

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4157

Abstract

Six Sigma is a disciplined approach to define, measure, analyse, improve and control processes that result in variability and defect reduction. Although Six Sigma has been widely embraced by many world class manufacturing companies, it is still new in the software industry. This paper initially makes an attempt to compare software industry with manufacturing industry. This is followed by presenting the results from a pilot survey on Six Sigma in the software industry. The focus is on the Six Sigma tools and techniques used by software industry, key Six Sigma metrics used by the software businesses, important attributes in the software development process and finally critical success factors for successful implementation of Six Sigma in software industry.

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Managerial Auditing Journal, vol. 19 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-6902

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Article
Publication date: 18 April 2008

Chengbo Wang, Craig Fergusson, Daniel Perry and Jiju Antony

A successful supply chain should ensure that all participating members benefit from the marketplace. To achieve this goal, the supply chain members need to improve their…

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2492

Abstract

Purpose

A successful supply chain should ensure that all participating members benefit from the marketplace. To achieve this goal, the supply chain members need to improve their competences all the time, which requires a continuous learning process. Thus, mutual learning, through knowledge sharing between the different members, is a necessary approach to increase the competence of supply chain partners. To realise efficient and effective knowledge sharing in a supply chain, this paper aims to explore and formulate a model that supports an enterprise with its management of the supply chain members' knowledge resource sharing (herein referred to as “advanced practice” and includes two levels of knowledge – strategic and operational). The model is based on the theories of supply chain management (SCM) and case‐based reasoning (CBR).

Design/methodology/approach

This research follows a conductive and inductive cycle. Firstly, based on the learning expounded through an extensive literature survey regarding SCM and CBR, as well as available empirical applications, the conceptual model is designed. Then the primary stage evaluation will be discussed regarding the feasibility and refinement of the model towards its maturity.

Findings

To share knowledge along the supply chain is theoretically sound, but a difficult task to realise in practice, due to the complexity of knowledge sharing between the different organizations.

Research limitations/implications

This research explores one of the important topics in SCM – knowledge sharing within a supply chain, and the model also extends and explores a new tool for this knowledge‐sharing process by applying CBR methodology.

Practical implications

The designed model in this research will provide a practice‐oriented vehicle allowing the supply chain members to share and apply their knowledge.

Originality/value

This research applies CBR in the domain of SCM, it both enriches the available approaches to supply chain performance enhancement and enlarges the application domains of CBR methodology.

Details

Business Process Management Journal, vol. 14 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-7154

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Article
Publication date: 3 May 2019

Lee Fergusson, Luke Van Der Laan, Craig White and June Balfour

The purpose of this paper is to explore the work-based learning (WBL) ethos of a professional studies doctoral program, a higher degree by research program implemented in…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the work-based learning (WBL) ethos of a professional studies doctoral program, a higher degree by research program implemented in Australia.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a preliminary case study of one higher degree by research program and two doctoral candidates participating in the program to explore the ethos and outcomes of the program.

Findings

The program has sought to develop a different type of higher education ethos, one characterized by an open-door communications policy, a critical friend philosophy, an emphasis on teamwork, pro tem supervision and a new model for doctoral supervision, self-designed work-based projects, self-directed research programs and the development of professional identity.

Originality/value

The characteristics and contributions of WBL programs at the doctoral level have been well documented in the academic literature, but the unique ethos, if there is one, of such programs has yet to be fully examined. This study goes some of the way to answering the question of whether such programs have a unique ethos and if so what are its features and how might it contribute to student development.

Details

Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-3896

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2001

Jill Hooks, David Coy and Howard Davey

Corporatisation of the New Zealand electricity industry during the 1990s increased the need for improved accountability. The publication of annual reports is one of the…

Abstract

Corporatisation of the New Zealand electricity industry during the 1990s increased the need for improved accountability. The publication of annual reports is one of the prime ways in which organisations meet their accountability obligations. This paper describes the development of a disclosure index from a public accountability perspective and reports the results of its application to the 1999 annual reports of the 33 electricity retail and distribution companies. The index was developed with the support of a panel representing 15 stakeholder groups. It is designed to assess the comprehensiveness (both in extent and quality) of annual report disclosures and incorporates a best‐practice model of annual reporting. Key areas of inadequate disclosure relate to performance measures (financial and non‐financial), segmental information, asset valuation details, and the cost of electricity purchased / generated. Improved disclosure to meet best‐practice guidelines would contribute to improved communication between companies and stakeholders.

Details

Pacific Accounting Review, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0114-0582

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Article
Publication date: 28 October 2014

Nick Drydakis

– The purpose of this paper is to examine the long-term correlates of bullying in school with aspects of functioning in adult employment outcomes.

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1074

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the long-term correlates of bullying in school with aspects of functioning in adult employment outcomes.

Design/methodology/approach

Bullying is considered and evaluated as a proxy for unmeasured productivity, and a framework is provided that outlines why bullying might affect employment outcomes through differences in skills and traits. Using Bivariate and Heckit models the paper employs a variety of specifications and finds several interesting patterns.

Findings

By utilising the 2008 Greek Behavioural Study data set the regression outcomes suggest that labour force participation, employment rate and hourly wages are negatively affected by bullying. In addition, men, homosexuals, immigrants, unmarried people, those having higher negative mental health symptoms, and those having lower human capital are more negatively affected by bullying in terms of labour force participation, employment probability and hourly wages. Moreover, Oaxaca-Blinder decompositions suggest that labour force participation gaps, employment gaps and hourly wage gaps between minority and majority groups, especially for gay men and the disabled, can be explained by bullying incidents.

Practical implications

It seems likely that having been a victim of bullying also has economic implications later in life due to withdrawal from the labour market and lower wages.

Originality/value

The retrospective bullying index used in the current study measured the combined and ordered effect of the duration and intensity of bullying, which generates 17 outcomes that ultimately capture a large range of alternative options. In addition, the author suggested that bullying might be understood as a productivity trait that provides a direct input into the production process, which might drive abilities or traits and influence adult employment outcomes. Contemporary economic analysis suggests that cognitive and non-cognitive skills are important factors that affect labour productivity through reasoning ability and productivity.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 35 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

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Book part
Publication date: 3 September 2015

Suleman Ibrahim

In terms of the concept of broken home as a juvenile delinquency risk factor, whilst Nigeria and Ghana are culturally different from western nations (Gyekye, 1996;…

Abstract

Purpose

In terms of the concept of broken home as a juvenile delinquency risk factor, whilst Nigeria and Ghana are culturally different from western nations (Gyekye, 1996; Hofstede, 1980; Smith, 2004), parental death (PDE) and parental divorce (PDI) have been previously taken-for-granted as one factor, that is ‘broken home’. This paper aims to deconstruct the singular model of ‘broken home’ and propose a binary model – the parental death and parental divorce hypotheses, with unique variables inherent in Nigerian/Ghanaian context.

Methodology/approach

It principally deploys the application of Goffman’s (1967) theory of stigma, anthropological insights on burial rites and other social facts (Gyekye, 1996; Mazzucato et al., 2006; Smith, 2004) to tease out diversity and complexity of lives across cultures, which specifically represent a binary model of broken home in Nigeria/Ghana. It slightly appraises post-colonial insights on decolonization (Agozino, 2003; Said, 1994) to interrogate both marginalized and mainstream literature.

Findings

Thus far, analyses have challenged the homogenization of the concept broken home in existing literature. Qualitatively unlike in the ‘West’, analyses have identified the varying meanings/consequences of parental divorce and parental death in Nigeria/Ghana.

Originality/value

Unlike existing data, this paper has contrasted the differential impacts of parental death and parental divorce with more refined variables (e.g. the sociocultural penalties of divorce such as stigma in terms of parental divorce and other social facts such as burial ceremonies, kinship nurturing, in relation to parental death), which helped to fill in the missing gap in comparative criminology literature.

Details

Violence and Crime in the Family: Patterns, Causes, and Consequences
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-262-7

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Article
Publication date: 23 January 2009

Carol Devanney

This paper aims to communicate the challenges and tensions faced by front‐line workers in negotiating the demands of performance targets and those of the young people they…

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783

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to communicate the challenges and tensions faced by front‐line workers in negotiating the demands of performance targets and those of the young people they work with.

Design/methodology/approach

An in‐depth study, over a two‐year period, of a number of training programmes combining participant observation and qualitative directed data collection.

Findings

Workers need to be sensitive to young people's previous educational experiences and social context while encouraging participation in education‐based work. Personal problems had to be addressed if progress towards the target of education, employment or training was to be achieved. Effective programmes rely on the front‐line workers but systems of accountability do not recognise the breadth of this work in handling the wider personal situations of young people. The role of training programmes needs to be better understood within this wider socio‐economic context.

Research limitations/implications

The study is of a small number of training programmes so it is not possible to generalise from the findings. A limitation of the paper is that the ethical, moral and practical implications of the study are not explored.

Practical implications

This paper extends our understanding of the complexity involved in the delivery of training programmes for young people.

Originality/value

Providing practitioners working in training settings with an account of the work which may address some of the criticisms often levelled at them. It has potential value to inform policy development, implementation and future forms of accountability.

Details

International Journal of Public Sector Management, vol. 22 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3558

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Article
Publication date: 31 December 2008

Isabelle Streng

This article focuses on group work with children using a board game format. Combining the principles of group work and board games helps to engage and motivate children…

Abstract

This article focuses on group work with children using a board game format. Combining the principles of group work and board games helps to engage and motivate children and adolescents to address and work through their difficulties. Lifegames are a series of six therapeutic board games developed for group work with children and adolescents who encounter adversity in their life as a consequence of bereavement, family break up, poor relationships, bullying, chronic illness or obesity. The games facilitate the understanding and disclosure of the complex feelings experienced by children and young people when they are confronted with traumatic life events. The games encourage and assist the participants to obtain and maintain behavioural change. Lifegames are a means to assist professionals in their group work with children and adolescents.

Details

Journal of Public Mental Health, vol. 7 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5729

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