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Article
Publication date: 1 July 1990

Tom Batley

The Institution of Professional Engineers New Zealand (IPENZ)commissioned a management training needs analysis of the 6,000 membersin 1988. The objectives were to…

Abstract

The Institution of Professional Engineers New Zealand (IPENZ) commissioned a management training needs analysis of the 6,000 members in 1988. The objectives were to determine the specific management subjects required for further education and training of experienced graduate engineers and their preferred methods of learning. The survey commenced with pilot study interviews with professional engineers leading to a questionnaire sent to a representative sample of IPENZ members throughout New Zealand. The results showed strong agreement about the managerial content of most professional engineering work. They also indicated a large majority who recognised the need for further education in business management subjects. The analysis indicated the most preferred management subjects from a comprehensive list ranked by professional engineers: personal and interpersonal management skills; general management and decision making; individual, group and organisational behaviour; finance and accounting; personnel management; project management. The least required management subjects chosen from the list were quantitative methods and information systems. These management subject preferences are not satisfied by the majority of short management training courses presently offered to professional engineers.

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Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 14 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

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Article
Publication date: 28 February 2020

Jeffrey W. Alstete and Nicholas J. Beutell

The purpose of this study is to analyze learning assurance measures derived from a business simulation as part of capstone business strategy courses delivered via distance…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to analyze learning assurance measures derived from a business simulation as part of capstone business strategy courses delivered via distance learning (DL) compared to traditional classroom (on-ground [OG]) delivery modes using experiential learning theory.

Design/methodology/approach

A sample of 595 undergraduate capstone business students from 21 course sections taught over a four-year period in a medium-sized private master’s level college is investigated. Variables included learning assurance measures from a competitive online simulation (GLO-BUS), gender, business degree major, capstone course grades and cumulative grade point averages. The analytic strategy included correlations, linear regressions, multiple regressions and multivariate analyses of variance.

Findings

Results reveal that there are significant differences in learning assurance report (LAR) scores, gender differences and differences between academic majors based on delivery mode (OG versus DL). Simulation performance was higher for DL students, although the relationship between simulation performance and final course grades was not significantly different for OG and DL cohorts.

Research limitations/implications

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, implications for courses, programs, curricula and learning assessment are considered. The strengths (actual performance measures) and potential limitations (e.g. possible deficiency of measures) of LAR scores are discussed.

Originality/value

This research compares OG and DL modes for strategic management course outcomes using direct assessments, including simulation learning assurance measures, student characteristics, capstone course grades and student grade point averages.

Details

Journal of International Education in Business, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-469X

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1991

Eric Frank and Roger Bennett

This monograph is devoted to the countries of Eastern Europe, whichare experiencing the dramatic changes following on from the fundamentaldevelopments of the last few…

Abstract

This monograph is devoted to the countries of Eastern Europe, which are experiencing the dramatic changes following on from the fundamental developments of the last few years. These countries, Albania, Bulgaria, Czecho‐slovakia, Hungary, Poland, Romania, the USSR and Yugoslavia, are likely to become members of a greater Europe in the future. Their economic and educational systems are examined and the structures of their management training systems are described.

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 15 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1993

Brigid Limerick and Eileen Heywood

The representation of women in management hierarchies in Australia,as throughout the world, is increasing. However, women are still notreaching top management levels and…

Abstract

The representation of women in management hierarchies in Australia, as throughout the world, is increasing. However, women are still not reaching top management levels and face a variety of pressures, both internal and external, to the organization in which they work. For women to operate at their optimum level of management skill it is important that they be encouraged to develop their management style within supportive learning cultures. Reports on the research leading up to and the establishment of a Women in Management Programme at the Queensland University of Technology. The rationale for such programmes is that the maximization of all our human resources is essential, if we are to manage effectively in the changing world of the twentieth century.

Details

Women in Management Review, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0964-9425

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1990

Alison J. Smith and John A. Piper

Management training and development is currently in vogue. Thereappears to be a growing belief in the benefits of investment in trainingand development. When a market is…

Abstract

Management training and development is currently in vogue. There appears to be a growing belief in the benefits of investment in training and development. When a market is buoyant is the time to consider and anticipate the consequences of a future downturn in demand. Such a downturn in demand may demonstrate increasing pressure to “justify” investment in training and development. There is a long established academic body of knowledge on the subject of evaluating training and development. From research evidence and the authors′ experience, the sponsors and the providers of training and development pay scant attention to systematic evaluation of these activities and investments. It is the authors′ contention that when the market′s critical assessment of the value of training and development increases there will be an increasing interest in evaluation. An overview of the history of evaluation traditions is provided and the state of play is commented upon. It is noted that there is a shortfall between theory and practice. It is argued that evaluation is a worthwhile and important activity and ways through the evaluation literature maze and the underpinnings of the activity are demonstrated, especially to management. Similarly the literature on evaluation techniques is reviewed. Tables are provided which demonstrate areas of major activity and identify relatively uncharted waters. This monograph provides a resource whereby practitioners can choose techniques which are appropriate to the activity on which they are engaged. It highlights the process which should be undertaken to make that choice in order that needs of the major stakeholders in the exercise are fully met.

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 14 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

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Article
Publication date: 23 August 2019

Jeffrey W. Alstete and Nicholas J. Beutell

This study aims to consider assurance of learning among undergraduate business students enrolled in capstone business strategy courses using the GLO-BUS competitive…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to consider assurance of learning among undergraduate business students enrolled in capstone business strategy courses using the GLO-BUS competitive simulation. Gender, academic major and business core course performance were examined.

Design/methodology/approach

Participants were 595 undergraduate capstone business students from 21 course sections taught over a four-year period. Variables included learning assurance measures, simulation performance, gender, major, business core course grades, capstone course grade and cumulative grade point average. Correlations, linear regression, multiple regression and multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) were used to analyze the data.

Findings

Learning assurance report scores were strongly related to simulation performance. Simulation performance was related to capstone course grade, which, in turn, was significantly related to the grade point average (GPA). Core business courses were related to learning assurance and performance indicators. Significant differences for gender and degree major were found for academic performance measures. Women and men did not differ in simulation performance.

Research limitations/implications

Limitations include the use of one simulation (GLO-BUS) and studying students at one university taught by one professor. Assurance of learning measures needs further study as factors in business program evaluation. Future research should analyze post-graduate performance and career achievements in relation to assurance of learning outcomes.

Originality/value

This study conducts empirical analyses of simulation learning that focuses entirely on direct measures, including student characteristics (gender, major), learning assurance measures, business core course grades, capstone course grades and student GPAs.

Details

Quality Assurance in Education, vol. 27 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-4883

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2005

Kathryn Jervis and Pamela Sherer

The paper describes an integrated, interdisciplinary nonprofit management three-course concentration developed for an undergraduate public service major at a small…

Abstract

The paper describes an integrated, interdisciplinary nonprofit management three-course concentration developed for an undergraduate public service major at a small, private college. We describe the course development process and implementation issues pertinent to nonprofit management education that include where to house programs, faculty issues, interdisciplinary teaching, students’ needs and experiential learning. Our course objectives aimed to develop business competencies from accounting, finance, management and marketing in the context of nonprofit organizations for students with no prior business knowledge. The paper concludes with a description of our three courses.

Details

Journal of Public Budgeting, Accounting & Financial Management, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1096-3367

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1986

David W. Birchall

A distance learning unit (Henley Distance Learning Ltd (HDLL)) was established at Henley — The Management College, in 1979 to meet the needs of those unable to participate…

Abstract

A distance learning unit (Henley Distance Learning Ltd (HDLL)) was established at Henley — The Management College, in 1979 to meet the needs of those unable to participate in more conventional forms of management training. The college's strategy in establishing the unit is described. The types of courses available include open management education in several areas: Masters Degree in Project Management; Masters in Management and the Henley Certificate and Diploma Courses. Course contents are outlined. Course development and monitoring involves HDLL counsellors and the graduate studies support network. The strategy used to develop distance learning materials, production methods and monitoring of objectives are outlined. Company use of HDLL materials is described briefly. A business development plan and careful planning of implementation are essential to those considering the development of a similar venture.

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 10 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1967

BERNARD TAYLOR

There is common agreement today in government and in industry about the need to educate and develop British management as a means of achieving faster economic growth and…

Abstract

There is common agreement today in government and in industry about the need to educate and develop British management as a means of achieving faster economic growth and more rapid technological change. As a result, huge investments are being made in new facilities for management training—in the business schools and universities, in the newly‐created polytechnics, in independent colleges such as Ashridge and Henley, and in industrial colleges, under the impetus of the Industrial Training Act. There is probably about a hundred million pounds of capital already invested in staff and facilities', and with the present drive for management education we could see this figure increased substantially over the next five years. When we consider the capital investment involved it is surprising how few statistics are available on which future plans can be based. Few private businessmen would launch a venture costing say a quarter of a million pounds without doing some market research—yet it is not unusual for a local authority, a university or an independent body to establish a management college costing several hundred thousand pounds without prior research. The market for short courses in particular is very volatile and as a result most colleges have passed through periods when their premises were only partially filled, and some colleges have been forced to close through lack of support. As Mr. Marples of Cambridge said in a recent article, “the small academic groups which exist in a number of our institutions of higher learning have discovered to their cost, the difficulties of securing support for their post‐experience ventures.” In Eire, and in Belgium, and in parts of the USA, comprehensive studies have been made into the needs and facilities for management education and training as a basis for policy making. In Britain one or two limited studies have been made but we still lack a sound statistical basis for the predictions which must be made about this vital market. Apart from the investigation we have carried out for Yorkshire, Northern Ireland is the only region which has commissioned a survey of needs and facilities before the re‐development of its management education service.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1978

Robin M. Hogarth

Although recent years have seen heavy investment in management education programmes, relatively little effort has been made at evaluation. Kane, however, has noted that…

Abstract

Although recent years have seen heavy investment in management education programmes, relatively little effort has been made at evaluation. Kane, however, has noted that the time when training and development activities are no longer questioned “appears to be well on its way to passing from a reality to a memory”.

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

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