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Article

Sally Jones and Jan P. Warhuus

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the social construction of gendered subjects in entrepreneurship education (EEd), through the analysis of course descriptions

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the social construction of gendered subjects in entrepreneurship education (EEd), through the analysis of course descriptions. For this purpose, the analytical constructs of the Fictive Student and the Fictive Entrepreneur are developed.

Design/methodology/approach

Through analysis of 86 course descriptions from 81 universities in 21 countries, this study examines the degree to which course descriptions use gendered language, how such language constructs gendered subjects, and the resultant implications.

Findings

This paper finds that course descriptions are predominantly, but not exclusively, masculine in their language. More importantly, the distribution of feminine and masculine language is uneven across course descriptions. Context variables such as regional or national culture differences do not explain this distribution. Instead, the phenomenon is explained by course content/type; whereby practice-based entrepreneurship courses are highly masculine, compared to traditional academic courses, where students learn about entrepreneurship as a social phenomenon.

Practical implications

Universities and educators have not taken into account recent research about the real and possible negative consequences of positioning entrepreneurship in a stereotypical, masculinized fashion. This may offer an inexpensive opportunity to improve recruitment and description accuracy.

Originality/value

The paper’s contribution is fourfold. First, it contributes to debates on the gendering of entrepreneurship by extending these into EEd. Second, it extends Sarasvathy’s (2004) concern with barriers to, rather than incentives for, entrepreneurship to include EEd. Third, it contributes to the emerging literature on entrepreneurship as practice, by highlighting the masculization of EEd, as it gets closer to practice and the role of language in this. Finally, it highlights the gendered implications of English medium courses.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 25 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

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Article

Demetrios G. Sampson and Panagiotis Zervas

This paper aims to present and evaluate a web‐based tool, namely ASK‐CDM‐ECTS, which facilitates authoring and publishing on the web descriptions of (open) academic courses

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to present and evaluate a web‐based tool, namely ASK‐CDM‐ECTS, which facilitates authoring and publishing on the web descriptions of (open) academic courses in machine‐readable format using an application profile of the Course Description Metadata (CDM) specification, namely CDM‐ECTS.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper examines existing open academic courses initiatives and presents a conceptual model for describing an academic course. Next, the elements of the conceptual model are mapped to the CDM specification, as well as to the CDM‐ECTS application profile for describing (open) academic courses with ECTS compatible information. Finally, the ASK‐CDM‐ECTS tool is presented, which allows authoring of (open) academic courses descriptions based on the proposed conceptual model and by following the CDM‐ECTS application profile.

Findings

Based on the evaluation results, it is evident that ASK‐CDM‐ECTS can clearly support the process of describing academic courses offered by European Higher Education Institutions (HEIs) with ECTS compatible information following the CDM‐ECTS application profile; and the process of searching and retrieving academic courses offered by European HEIs.

Research limitations/implications

The evaluation scenarios were executed with users’ representatives from only one HEI. Future work intends to conduct further experiments involving users’ representatives from different HEIs for evaluating the proposed tool.

Social implications

OpenCourseWare has become a social movement aiming to equal opportunities in education. This paper presents the ASK‐CDM‐ECTS tool, which can be exploited for setting‐up European Open Courses Initiatives that will facilitate open access to education and learning for the societies of the EU Member States.

Originality/value

Despite the development of the CDM specification for describing (open) academic courses, and of its application profile CDM‐ECTS, it appears that there exists no software tool that allows authoring and publishing on the web descriptions of (open) academic courses following CDM‐ECTS. Thus, in this paper, the authors address this issue by introducing the ASK‐CDM‐ECTS tool, aiming at describing (open) academic courses following the CDM‐ECTS application profile.

Details

Campus-Wide Information Systems, vol. 30 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1065-0741

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Book part

Emily Vardell and Deborah H. Charbonneau

This study investigates the intersections of health and social justice topics in the library and information science (LIS) curriculum. Course offerings from 60 American…

Abstract

This study investigates the intersections of health and social justice topics in the library and information science (LIS) curriculum. Course offerings from 60 American Library Association-Accredited LIS programs were extracted and comprised the study sample. Using a thematic content analysis, a total of 220 course descriptions were analyzed to assess the inclusion of health justice topics. A main finding was that only eight LIS course descriptions closely integrated health and social justice issues. In addition, four overarching thematic areas of LIS courses were identified from the dataset as conceptual pathways with the potential to further incorporate health justice aspects in LIS coursework. Recommendations for how to expand course offerings in these areas are explored. Overall, these preliminary findings help to map the existing health and social justice curricula and contribute the LIS educator viewpoint for both reducing health disparities and advancing health justice conversations.

Details

Roles and Responsibilities of Libraries in Increasing Consumer Health Literacy and Reducing Health Disparities
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-341-8

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Article

Brady Lund and Ting Wang

Considerable overlap exists between the disciplines of library and information science and museum studies. Exploiting the overlap and examining those areas were…

Abstract

Purpose

Considerable overlap exists between the disciplines of library and information science and museum studies. Exploiting the overlap and examining those areas were library/museum instruction courses diverge may provide valuable insights for how to improve the quality of these courses and better prepare students for instructional roles in both disciplines.

Design/methodology/approach

Word frequency and thematic analysis of the instructional course descriptions for all 52 American Library Association-accredited Master of Library and Information Science programs in the USA and 49 museum studies and affiliated (e.g. MA in anthropology with museum studies concentration) programs is performed.

Findings

Each discipline has some specific language to describe tasks specific to itself (e.g. museums), but these comprise a small percentage of the total language usage. Among other terms and themes, overlap occurs at a rate of about 50%. The remaining 35-45% of terms and themes reveal areas that are emphasized in only one discipline, but could be beneficial to incorporate in the curriculum/content in both disciplines.

Research limitations/implications

This research builds on a growing corpus of work demonstrating relations between museum studies and library and information science, and their status within a metadiscipline of information; this research presents a comparison of course content that may inform future curriculum/content development.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, no study of this type has been performed with museum studies courses, nor has a comparison between the two disciplines been investigated at this level.

Details

Information and Learning Sciences, vol. 120 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-5348

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Article

Jerry D. Saye

This paper describes the introduction and integration of the organization of electronic resources into the library and information science curriculum. The description is…

Abstract

This paper describes the introduction and integration of the organization of electronic resources into the library and information science curriculum. The description is based upon the experience of the School of Information and Library Science, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill although it is representative of practices at other schools. It identifies courses throughout the curriculum which have the organization of electronic resources as a major focus, those with some coverage, and courses with a peripheral relationship to the topic. It also identifies other means by which the topic can be included in a student’s program.

Details

OCLC Systems & Services: International digital library perspectives, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1065-075X

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Article

Michael R. Gabriel

In view of the fact that evaluating library collections is so valuable in learning to what degree they lend support to all phases of curricula, it is surprising that so…

Abstract

In view of the fact that evaluating library collections is so valuable in learning to what degree they lend support to all phases of curricula, it is surprising that so little attention is paid to evaluation techniques based on library support for individual courses of instruction. Surveying relevant library materials for specific courses is much superior to merely analyzing collection support for academic departments or programs. The first step in the process usually involves assigning call numbers to courses in order to measure the library shelflist and count the number of relevant materials. This is a laborious and sometimes frustrating experience, but not without significant advantages for librarians pursuing such quantitative evaluations.

Details

Collection Building, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0160-4953

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Article

Zawiyah M Yusof and Robert W Chell

This article is the result of a brief survey, conducted across the Internet by researchers from the Archives and Records Management Programme at the University of Wales at…

Abstract

This article is the result of a brief survey, conducted across the Internet by researchers from the Archives and Records Management Programme at the University of Wales at Aberystwyth. The authors discuss the need for records management training and education world‐wide, and the emergence of records management as a subset of information management, with an acknowledged impact on the systematic and efficient management of organisations. They show how the focus of records management has shifted over the recent past from the archival management of unwanted documents, to the management of electronic systems, giving records managers an equal standing with other professionals in the field of information management. Using a comparison between Malaysia, where much of the training is provided by visiting consultants, and the United Kingdom, where records management training is provided by the universities, the authors conclude that the needs of qualified and well‐informed professionals in this distinct field is dependent upon the training and education provided by courses in universities world‐wide. Their survey, however, reveals that there is no standard approach to the training provided by these institutions: some are likely to reflect their archival origins, others represent various streams of the broad context of information studies.

Details

Records Management Journal, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0956-5698

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Article

Rebecca L. Harris‐Pierce and Yan Quan Liu

This study aims to present the results of a survey of library and information science (LIS) schools' websites used to determine if the number of data curation courses

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to present the results of a survey of library and information science (LIS) schools' websites used to determine if the number of data curation courses offered is adequate to address the needs of the so‐called “data deluge”. Many authors have identified a gap in the education of LIS students for data curation.

Design/methodology/approach

This study surveyed the websites of LIS schools in North America to identify data curation courses. It reviewed and analyzed course descriptions, objectives and syllabi (when available) as well as compared course objectives, requirements, topics, assignments, and projects of the identified courses.

Findings

Of the 52 LIS schools in North America's websites examined in this study, 16 institutions offered courses on data curation. The increase in the number of schools offering courses in data curation showed that LIS schools are responding to the demand for data curation professionals. More LIS schools need to add data curation to their curriculum. LIS schools currently offering data curation courses should continue to work together to determine the optimal course objectives and learning outcomes.

Originality/value

Although there are several papers focused on particular data curation programs at a few universities, there are no papers that provide an overall view of the status of data curation education in higher education institutions today. This research will be of value and interest to LIS educators and professionals to determine if there is adequate education in place and to identify and evaluate the current state of data curation education.

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Article

Kathryn Jervis and Pamela Sherer

The paper describes an integrated, interdisciplinary nonprofit management three-course concentration developed for an undergraduate public service major at a small…

Abstract

The paper describes an integrated, interdisciplinary nonprofit management three-course concentration developed for an undergraduate public service major at a small, private college. We describe the course development process and implementation issues pertinent to nonprofit management education that include where to house programs, faculty issues, interdisciplinary teaching, students’ needs and experiential learning. Our course objectives aimed to develop business competencies from accounting, finance, management and marketing in the context of nonprofit organizations for students with no prior business knowledge. The paper concludes with a description of our three courses.

Details

Journal of Public Budgeting, Accounting & Financial Management, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1096-3367

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Article

Joan Marques, Svetlana Holt and Virginia Green

The purpose of the paper is to share practices with other scholars who are on the outlook for different, more rewarding ways of facilitating formal management education…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the paper is to share practices with other scholars who are on the outlook for different, more rewarding ways of facilitating formal management education, and to invite feedback and additional suggestions from colleagues in formal and informal educational settings about additional approaches that make a positive difference.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is structured in a sequential format, presenting the three contributors’ practices in separate sections, yet unifying them through a coherent structure of a brief course description, a description of the creative infusion, and some sample implementations.

Findings

Management courses that focus on creativity, involvement, interaction, and a trans‐disciplinary approach, ensure greater cohesion between left‐ and right‐brain thinking.

Practical implications

Management in an increasingly diversifying yet intertwining work environment brings along challenges that have not been encountered before. Some teaching scholars in higher education consider this challenge problematic, but others perceive it as a wonderful opportunity toward more effective and rewarding approaches to learning and communicating.

Originality/value

This paper presents a valuable piece of evidence, albeit on a minute scale, that scholars who engage in practice‐based management education and include elements from the real world in their courses, experience enhanced gratification within themselves and from their students.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 32 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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