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1 – 10 of over 172000

Abstract

Details

A Machine Learning, Artificial Intelligence Approach to Institutional Effectiveness in Higher Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-900-8

Book part
Publication date: 9 August 2012

Meifang Xiang and Robert Gruber

This study examines an issue that confronts most instructors in the first financial accounting course at the postsecondary level, that is, some students have had a high…

Abstract

This study examines an issue that confronts most instructors in the first financial accounting course at the postsecondary level, that is, some students have had a high school accounting course, while others have not. Specifically, this study investigates the effect a high school accounting course has on student performance in their first postsecondary level financial accounting course (midterm examinations and course grades). The results suggest this relationship is significant and positive, yet must be interpreted carefully. For example, scholastic aptitude, time management skills, and other intrinsic values also play an important role in student achievement.

Details

Advances in Accounting Education: Teaching and Curriculum Innovations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-757-4

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 15 September 2022

Ayman Yasin, Luae Al-Tarawneh, Fadia El-Issa and Abdallah Al-Zoubi

This study aims to investigate students’ satisfaction, self-efficacy and perceived competencies in a ‘technical writing and communication skills’ course after the switch…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate students’ satisfaction, self-efficacy and perceived competencies in a ‘technical writing and communication skills’ course after the switch of teaching the course from face to face to fully online during and after COVID-19. The study also measured the Achievement of Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology course learning outcomes (CLOs).

Design/methodology/approach

A descriptive cross-sectional survey design approach was adopted in this study. Students were asked to respond to an online survey after completion of the course to measure the target parameters. The data of 250 respondents, analyzed with IBM SPSS Statistics 28, show high scores on all constructs.

Findings

Statistically significant differences among gender, field of study, grade point average (GPA) level, type of school attended and attainment of English proficiency certificate were detected for students in terms of their baseline perceived competencies, achievement of CLOs and self-efficacy scores. In addition, gender, field of study, GPA and holding an international English proficiency certificate had statistically significant effect, whereas the academic level and type of school were insignificant.

Research limitations/implications

First, the data had been collected through survey only. A limitation of this method is that there could be survey fraud. Second, as some respondents found the survey long, their responses might have been less reliable. Moreover, as the survey was entirely conducted online, this may have caused limited sampling, because some respondents are less likely to have internet access/disconnection and respond to online surveys. Furthermore, this research had focused on studying the impact of an online course on university students’ achievement in a Jordanian university, this limits the generalizability of the result to students of other levels and classes, or ones studying in other universities or living in different countries.

Practical implications

Because of its impact on effective teaching and achievement, educators need to pay much attention to self-efficacy when designing new curricula for different environmental contexts. Furthermore, it is apparent that some courses, such as “technical writing” can be taught fully online without affecting students’ performance and achievement. Because educators always look for ways that make teaching effective, they may need to consider online platforms for teaching specific courses, hence save time, effort and resources.

Originality/value

A course on technical writing and communication skills offered to undergraduate engineering and information technology students at Princess Sumaya University for Technology was switched from face to face to fully online modality during the COVID-19 pandemic in the period 2020–2021. The effect of such massive and sudden transformation on students’ achievement and satisfaction called for immediate scrutiny of the prospect and expectancy of online learning.

Details

Interactive Technology and Smart Education, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-5659

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 20 September 2022

Peter Hines and Torbjørn H. Netland

This paper reports exploratory findings about teaching in the metaverse using a virtual reality (VR) platform and head-mounted displays. This paper addresses three…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper reports exploratory findings about teaching in the metaverse using a virtual reality (VR) platform and head-mounted displays. This paper addresses three research questions: Is the metaverse an appropriate platform for teaching Lean? What are the benefits and problems of this approach over traditional classroom methods? What are the future implications for teaching Lean in the VR-enabled metaverse?

Design/methodology/approach

The research presented in this paper is exploratory. A critical realism approach is adopted using action research through the preparation, delivery and review of the first four masterclasses entitled Leading Intelligent Lean offered by Gemba (formerly The Leadership Network). The data collection methods included a pre-workshop questionnaire, participant observation, focus groups and end-of-course surveys.

Findings

It was found that Lean can be taught successfully in the metaverse. There are many related benefits, particularly in terms of the high levels of immersion and the “wow” factor. Remaining technological limitations are reduced by continually improving the metaverse platform and the course content and delivery. The authors conclude that the metaverse is a useful addition to teaching Lean – and is especially promising when used in a blended teaching approach.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first report of teaching Lean in a VR-enabled metaverse and one of the first of teaching and learning in the metaverse regardless of topic. The respective problems and benefits of this approach versus teaching in a traditional classroom setting are discussed.

Details

International Journal of Lean Six Sigma, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-4166

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 30 August 2022

Wei Wang, Yongyong Zhao, Yenchun Jim Wu and Mark Goh

Although MOOCs have become a pervasive online learning model, the problem of high dropout rates still persists. Gathering the reasons for the high dropout rate can help to…

Abstract

Purpose

Although MOOCs have become a pervasive online learning model, the problem of high dropout rates still persists. Gathering the reasons for the high dropout rate can help to improve the platform design and management of the MOOCs.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 74 studies was extracted from the Web of Science and Scopus. Following the PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses) guidelines, the open-source program CiteSpace is employed to review and induce the studies on the antecedents of MOOC dropout.

Findings

The antecedents of the MOOC dropout rate are the psychological, social, personal, course-related, and time factors, and the unexpected hidden cost. Motivation and interaction, which have a decisive impact on the dropout rate of MOOCs, interact with each other. Interaction helps to strengthen the motivation, and appropriate course design enhances the degree of interaction.

Originality/value

From the perspective of a learner, the more knowledge and skills the learners acquire, the more likely they will complete the course. Possessing adequate foundational knowledge is one way to arrest the dropout rate. On the part of the MOOC platform, better course design eases the dropout rate. Further, the course duration and hidden cost in MOOCs contribute to the dropout rate.

Details

Library Hi Tech, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 12 August 2022

Hesham El Marsafawy, Rumpa Roy and Fahema Ali

This study aims to identify the gap between the requirements of the accreditation bodies and the widely used learning management systems (LMSs) in assessing the intended…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to identify the gap between the requirements of the accreditation bodies and the widely used learning management systems (LMSs) in assessing the intended learning outcomes (ILOs). In addition, this study aims to introduce a framework, along with the evaluation of the functionality of the LMS, for measuring the ILO.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative method was deployed to examine the gap between the requirements of the accreditation standards and the LMS functionalities. The researchers collaborated to design a mechanism, develop a system architecture to measure the ILO in alignment with the accreditation standards and guide the development of the Moodle plugin. The appropriateness and effectiveness of the plugin were evaluated within the scope of assessment mapping and design. Focus group interviews were conducted to collect feedback from the instructors and program leaders regarding its implementation.

Findings

The results of this study indicate that there is no standardized mechanism to measure course and program ILO objectively, using the existing LMS. The implementation of the plugin shows the appropriateness and effectiveness of the system in generating ILO achievement reports, which was confirmed by the users.

Originality/value

This study proposed a framework and developed a system architecture for the objective measurement of the ILO through direct assessment. The plugin was tested to generate consistent reports during the measurement of course and program ILO. The plugin has been implemented across Gulf University’s program courses, ensuring appropriate reporting and continuous improvement.

Details

Quality Assurance in Education, vol. 30 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-4883

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 16 August 2022

Burke Scarbrough

As concurrent enrollment (CE) programs continue to expand in the USA, a growing share of English teaching at the first-year university level is taking place in secondary…

Abstract

Purpose

As concurrent enrollment (CE) programs continue to expand in the USA, a growing share of English teaching at the first-year university level is taking place in secondary schools. Though much of the discourse surrounding CE courses relates to quality control, the purpose of this paper is to argue for a reconsideration of the terms by which these courses are valued, calling for a shift from alignment to collaboration as the crucial work for participating English teachers.

Design/methodology/approach

This essay responds to scholarship and primary source documents related to CE programs in light of the author’s experience as liaison for a CE literature course at a Midwestern regional university in the USA.

Findings

An ethic of alignment pervades discourse about CE programs. The quality control promised by this “alignment story” presupposes a stable university course to be aligned with and the emulation of college faculty pedagogy as the high-priority intellectual labor. This alignment story is undermined by the variation within and between on-campus and high school iterations of the literature course. Rather than justifying an alignment ethic, this variation continually renews important questions about what constitutes college-level engagement with literature and how to best help students achieve it in a particular setting. These questions call for deliberation among a community of English teachers, not alignment of one constituency to another.

Originality/value

This essay builds on previous scholarship about the importance of alignment and the opportunity for collaboration in CE by exploring how an emphasis on the former misrecognizes the importance of the latter.

Details

English Teaching: Practice & Critique, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1175-8708

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 24 August 2022

Neema Florence Mosha and Patrick Ngulube

The study investigated teaching research data management (RDM) courses in higher learning institutions (HLIs) in Tanzania to enable postgraduate students to work with…

Abstract

Purpose

The study investigated teaching research data management (RDM) courses in higher learning institutions (HLIs) in Tanzania to enable postgraduate students to work with their research data.

Design/methodology/approach

The study triangulated research methods. Postgraduate students were investigated using survey questionnaires to learn about their needs and perceptions of the teaching RDM courses in HLIs. Key informants (academicians, information and communication technologists and library staff) were also investigated using in-depth interviews to explore their experiences and knowledge of teaching RDM courses. SPSS statistical software was used for analysing quantitative data; qualitative data were analysed thematically.

Findings

A total of 70 questionnaires were distributed to postgraduate students with a returning rate of 44 (69%). On the other hand, 12 key informants were interviewed. A low level of RDM literacy was revealed among 38 (86%) respondents. Most respondents 40 (91%) reported the need for HLIs to start teaching RDM courses. A lack of skills and knowledge in teaching RDM courses was revealed among key informants. The competency-based, adaptive and constructive teaching techniques were selected for teaching RDM courses, whereas intensive training and online tutorials were revealed as teaching formats.

Research limitations/implications

This study focused on teaching RDM courses in HLIs. The survey questionnaires were distributed to all 2nd year postgraduate students, however, the findings cannot be generalised to all postgraduate students due to the response rate obtained. The findings obtained from key informants can also not be used as a basis for generalization across HLIs.

Practical implications

This study concluded that postgraduate students need to be well equipped with skills and knowledge on RDM and its related concepts; teaching RDM courses should be regarded as a continuous programme for benefit of students, researchers and the community at large.

Social implications

Appropriate teaching of RDM courses among students not only ensures that students meet the funders’ and publishers’ requirements, but also encourages students to store and share their research among researchers worldwide; thus increasing collaboration and visibility of the datasets and data owners through data citations and acknowledgements.

Originality/value

This is a comprehensive study that provides findings for HLIs to teach RDM courses in HLIs, especially for postgraduate students. The findings revealed the need for teaching RDM courses in HLIs. The study provides the basis for further RDM research in HLIs and research institutions.

Details

Library Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 July 2022

Ineta Luka

This study aims to evaluate a culture-based blended learning multilingual course created for adult learners in ten languages and the development of learners’ 21st-century…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to evaluate a culture-based blended learning multilingual course created for adult learners in ten languages and the development of learners’ 21st-century skills during its implementation in six European countries – Croatia, Latvia, Slovenia, Romania, Poland and Czechia in the COVID-19 period.

Design/methodology/approach

A cross-sectional survey of 638 participants was conducted using a paper-based questionnaire. Data analysis was carried out applying Bereday’s four-step model comprising description, interpretation, juxtaposition and comparison to find out similarities and differences among various groups of learners.

Findings

Overall, learners have developed their 21st-century skills, but the improvement has not been the same for all target audiences. Learners with economic, social and cultural barriers were more positive in their evaluation than those with geographic and learning obstacles.

Research limitations/implications

The research was conducted during the COVID-19 pandemic, and the face-to-face stage was replaced with online learning on virtual platforms, which impacted the research results. The results cannot be generalized to all adult learners as significant differences were discovered among various target groups of learners.

Practical implications

The course may be implemented for formal and non-formal adult education when face-to-face teaching/learning is restricted.

Social implications

The findings indicate that the course is especially suitable for learners with economic, social and cultural obstacles to learning.

Originality/value

The article focuses on the use of blended learning in non-formal/informal adult education, which is a less widely researched area. The target course implemented during the COVID-19 pandemic shows a novel way of engaging adult learners in lifelong learning, including those with certain barriers to learning.

Details

Quality Assurance in Education, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-4883

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 August 2022

Samia Naqvi, Maria Teresa De Guzman Matriano and Jamel Terzi Alimi

Entrepreneurship-oriented courses are increasingly being offered in higher education institutions (HEIs) around the world. However, in the case of Oman, where this study…

Abstract

Purpose

Entrepreneurship-oriented courses are increasingly being offered in higher education institutions (HEIs) around the world. However, in the case of Oman, where this study was conducted, little or no research has been conducted, to date, to explore the perceptions of students and faculty members regarding the entrepreneurship-oriented courses they participate in, which is a serious gap in the literature. This study aims to fill this gap by examining the beliefs and conceptions that learners and faculty at a private HEI in Muscat, Oman, had about the course entitled Entrepreneurship and New Venture Creation (ENVC).

Design/methodology/approach

The primary and secondary research questions are addressed using a mixed-methods approach that includes an online student questionnaire answered by 110 students who had studied the ENVC course, a focus group discussion with eight students facilitated by MS Teams and semi-structured interviews with two faculty members.

Findings

The findings revealed that the study participants had a very positive view of the ENVC course discussed here as they pointed to several benefits, including improved knowledge of business and entrepreneurship concepts, increased familiarity with the local business environment, development of entrepreneurial intention and improvement of their critical thinking, creativity and innovation skills. In addition, the results revealed some concerns among the participating students, particularly regarding the lack of adequate training sessions on risk management and financial planning. The participants also requested hands-on experience through industrial entrepreneurship training and in-residence-entrepreneurship programs.

Research limitations/implications

This study raises a number of possibilities for further research on this type of course in terms of students’ employability skills, know-how and agency when the time comes for them to enter the real world of business and employment. Future work would benefit from using a longitudinal survey on a group of alumni to triangulate and compare the various findings that were reached here. It would certainly be even more fruitful if conducted at two or more HEIs and with larger population samples to ensure broad coverage, representation and generalization. Work along these lines would certainly refine and extend our findings.

Practical implications

This study has significant pedagogical implications for future graduate students seeking employment, entrepreneurship course developers and faculty. Relatively, the educational outcomes of entrepreneurship education will also rely on the way entrepreneurship is being taught to students. It is recommended that entrepreneurship teaching should focus on cognitive development and active implementation of in-house incubation for well-planned innovative business ideas. This will provide opportunities for students to gain real-life experiences and identify their strengths and weaknesses, as well as the areas and skills that need to be maintained; hence, further research on the effectiveness of in-house incubation could best be considered for the next study. Another concern raised in this study is the lack of training in financial planning. Hence, further research can be considered on how to improve the financial planning skills of students for a start-up journey.

Social implications

This course is designed in alignment with Oman Vision 2040, which places great emphasis on entrepreneurship as it plays an important role in the planned economic diversification and sustainability, in which innovation derived from entrepreneurship development will be used as the main driver for the development of infrastructure and educational systems that encourage entrepreneurship. Moreover, the ENVC course focuses on the concept of social entrepreneurship. It inculcates a sense of responsibility for supporting the immediate society among students. Learning the perceptions of students and teachers will provide opportunities to achieve their academic goals, which will reap economic and financial returns in the long run. The development of entrepreneurial skills and intentions of students will eventually help in boosting the country’s economy and its social fabric, thus improving the overall quality of life of Omani society.

Originality/value

Even though this study is an exploratory investigation, the framework sets out clear empirical insights into the entrepreneurship course development, its main contents, assessments and learners’ and faculty members’ perceptions of the design, intent, content and delivery of the ENVC course and has crucial implications for all the stakeholders. The originality of this case study lies in the fact that it is the first of its kind in the body of research as it links theory to practice and will be a useful reference for entrepreneurship course developers, higher education faculty and students.

Details

Journal of Science and Technology Policy Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2053-4620

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 172000