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Book part
Publication date: 5 June 2017

Anthony J. Trifiro

Planning and implementing in-service professional development to support teachers’ pedagogical practices for English language learners (ELLs) first considers building upon…

Abstract

Planning and implementing in-service professional development to support teachers’ pedagogical practices for English language learners (ELLs) first considers building upon existing teachers’ knowledge and understanding of practice. Teaching English Learners Academic Content (TELAC) is an in-service professional development model that provides an enriched program curriculum to urban teachers seeking to improve teaching practices for their ELLs. Through an integrative approach of learning coupled with learning experiences, practicum activities, observational feedback, and coaching, teachers initiate refinement to practice that reflect culturally sustaining pedagogy. Funded by the U.S. Department of Education, Office of English Language Acquisition/National Professional Development program, Teaching English Learners Academic Content (TELAC) (2012–2017) is a K-12 program in Arizona designed to build a cadre of teachers adept with implementation of instructional strategies that support ELL academic success. All of the participants in this in-service professional development program are K-12 teachers of English language learners, teach any grade level and subject area in urban school districts with a majority of students who are second language learners of English. Teachers’ shared common concern is the need to improve pedagogical practices for ELLs and to personally develop their knowledge and capability to change teaching practices.

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Book part
Publication date: 18 March 2020

Paul Benneworth, Renze Kolster, Martin Stienstra, Laura Franco Garcia and Ben Jongbloed

There is an increasing interest in integrating sustainable development into higher education curricula to increase young graduates’ agency in addressing sustainable…

Abstract

There is an increasing interest in integrating sustainable development into higher education curricula to increase young graduates’ agency in addressing sustainable development goals (SDGs). Education for sustainable development (ESD) involves raising awareness of opportunities to create local solutions, a willingness or desire to construct those solutions, and the organizational skills to implement these solutions in context. As these courses are integrated into academic curricula, students must learn practical-ends driven skills in ways compatible with existing academic standards frameworks oriented toward theoretical understanding. These can lead to very different pedagogical orientations (theoretical and practical), one reason that could explain the relatively limited uptake of ESD within higher education to date. The authors develop a model by which a single educational experience could help to bridge between these two orientations. The authors use a single study of an example of student volunteer projects where students spend 2–4 months working on a knowledge transfer project to the global south, oriented toward solving the SDGs. The authors reflect on tensions, problems, and solutions in producing graduates oriented to tackling urgent contemporary societal issues, while gaining valuable personal development experience.

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Article
Publication date: 12 March 2018

Maria Margarita Meza Rios, Irene Marie Herremans, Jean E. Wallace, Norm Althouse, David Lansdale and Manuel Preusser

This paper aims to determine whether high school students can become agents of change in their local communities by participating in a formal internship program…

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1036

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to determine whether high school students can become agents of change in their local communities by participating in a formal internship program implemented through a partnership between academia (high schools and universities), nonprofit organizations and key community stakeholders.

Design/methodology/approach

Pre- and post-assessments, activity journals and on-line interviews are used to measure the impact of internships on high school students’ sustainability leadership, using a train-the-trainer intervention led by university interns. A conceptual problem-solving framework is proposed and empirically tested to explore the linkages between complex problem constellations, sustainability transition strategies and sustainability visions.

Findings

The five core leadership competencies (systems thinking, strategic, anticipatory, normative and interpersonal) may not be as uniquely discrete as suggested in the literature. An effective learning experience depends on students’ developing competence in their ability to implement a strategic intervention, which is better acquired through hands-on experience rather than a classroom setting.

Practical implications

Students need experiential learning outside of the classroom to make sustainability come alive as a viable option for their communities.

Social implications

The principles of social responsivity, engagement, experiential learning, capacity-building and entrepreneurialism can be executed by transforming the campus into a learning lab, which includes the local community.

Originality/value

This study empirically demonstrates that students need involvement in strategic interventions to imagine and conceptualize sustainability visions. It also shows how academia can help fulfill the United Nations sustainable development goals.

Details

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. 19 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

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Article
Publication date: 9 June 2014

Leanna Lawter, Tuvana Rua and Chun Guo

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how learning styles and learning spaces interact to stimulate deep learning. Specifically the paper investigated the…

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3589

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how learning styles and learning spaces interact to stimulate deep learning. Specifically the paper investigated the interaction of learning styles with ethics education and the ethical climate to influence the likelihood of engaging in ethical behavior.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from two groups of students – those who had completed a business ethics course and those who had not completed a business ethics course. The sample consisted of 180 undergraduate students at a private university in the USA. Data were analyzed using regression analysis to test the hypotheses. A scenario-based measure of the likelihood of engaging in ethical behavior was developed and implemented in the study.

Findings

Both ethics education and ethical climate had a direct impact on a student ' s likelihood of engaging in ethical behavior. The interaction between learning style and business ethics class significantly impacted experiential learners’ likelihood of engaging in ethical behaviors. Results for non-experiential learners as relates to ethical climate were non-significant, but ad hoc analysis indicates ethical climate significantly impacted likelihood to engage in ethical behaviors.

Practical implications

The findings have practical implications for how universities should utilize learning spaces both inside and outside the classroom to be stimulate deep learning and be more effective in sensitizing students to ethical behavior.

Originality/value

The results support using formal and informal learning spaces to stimulate deep learning as it relates to ethics education in universities.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 33 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 3 August 2020

Jacqulyn Ann Williams and Christine Schiwietz

Colleges and universities play a significant role in preparing students to navigate the many issues and challenges that characterize contemporary societies, challenges…

Abstract

Colleges and universities play a significant role in preparing students to navigate the many issues and challenges that characterize contemporary societies, challenges that are simultaneously local, national, and global in nature. This has led to increased calls within higher education to re-envision educational practices to prioritize global competency. However, ambiguity persists regarding how faculty in transnational higher education contexts, specifically international branch campuses, understand global competency and conceive of their role in shaping students’ sense of self, perspective-taking, and social responsibility. Using a social constructivist lens, this chapter outlines initial case study research, informed by King and Magolda’s (2005) constructive-developmental model of intercultural maturity, Kegan’s (1994) scholarship on self-authorship, as well as Kolb’s (1984) experiential learning theory. This investigative research may be useful in terms of understanding how administrators and educators facilitate the environmental conditions and educational practices that lead to global competency and socially responsible global citizens. The broader implications of such study could potentially inform educational change policy and confirm the important role internationalized institutions, such as branch campus universities play in shaping and transforming societies.

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Article
Publication date: 25 February 2014

Lene Bjerg Hall-Andersen and Ole Broberg

The purpose of this paper is to shed light on the problematics of learning across knowledge boundaries in organizational settings. The paper specifically explores learning

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to shed light on the problematics of learning across knowledge boundaries in organizational settings. The paper specifically explores learning processes that emerge, when a new knowledge domain is introduced into an existing organizational practice with the aim of creating a new combined practice.

Design/methodology/approach

A case study was carried out as a “natural experiment” in an engineering consultancy, where emerging initiatives to integrate the newly acquired competencies into the existing practice were explored. A theoretical framework informed by selected perspectives on learning processes and boundary processes was applied on three illustrative vignettes to illuminate learning potentials and shortcomings in boundary processes.

Findings

In the engineering consultancy, it was found that while learning did occur in the consultancy organization, it remained discrete in ‘pockets’ of learning; mainly at an individual level, at project level or as domain-specific learning. Learning processes were intertwined with elements of domain-specific interests, power, managerial support, structural conditions, material and epistemic differences between knowledge domains.

Research limitations/implications

The finding in this paper is based on a single case study: hence, the findings' generalizability may be limited.

Practical implications

The paper argues that learning across knowledge domains needs various forms of supporting initiatives and constant readiness to alter or counteract when an initiative's shortcomings appear or undesired learning loops arise.

Originality/value

The paper contributes to understanding the complexity of learning across knowledge boundaries in organizational settings.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 26 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 30 July 2020

Ruohan Gong and Zuqi Tang

This paper aims to investigate the approach combine the deep learning (DL) and finite element method for the magneto-thermal coupled problem.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate the approach combine the deep learning (DL) and finite element method for the magneto-thermal coupled problem.

Design/methodology/approach

To achieve the DL of electrical device with the hypothesis of a small dataset, with ground truth data obtained from the FEM analysis, U-net, a highly efficient convolutional neural network (CNN) is used to extract hidden features and trained in a supervised manner to predict the magneto-thermal coupled analysis results for different topologies. Using part of the FEM results as training samples, the DL model obtained from effective off-line training can be used to predict the distribution of the magnetic field and temperature field of other cases.

Findings

The possibility and feasibility of the proposed approach are investigated by discussing the influence of various network parameters, in particular, the four most important factors are training sample size, learning rate, batch size and optimization algorithm respectively. It is shown that DL based on U-net can be used as an efficiency tool in multi-physics analysis and achieve good performance with only small datasets.

Originality/value

It is shown that DL based on U-net can be used as an efficiency tool in multi-physics analysis and achieve good performance with only small datasets.

Details

COMPEL - The international journal for computation and mathematics in electrical and electronic engineering , vol. 39 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0332-1649

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2012

Sinikka Moilanen

The purpose of this paper is to examine how a parent company ensures reliable accounting information from its subsidiaries located in a significantly different…

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1048

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine how a parent company ensures reliable accounting information from its subsidiaries located in a significantly different environment, analyzing the process and its outcomes.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper employs the conceptualization of management control as a loosely‐coupled system to explore the integration of accounting‐related work between a parent company and subsidiaries. Three Western firms and their subsidiaries in the territory of the former Soviet Union are studied, focusing on the couplings between different elements of control and their outcomes, and taking accounting as an object and element of control.

Findings

The results show how other elements of control can steer accounting‐related work. As the organizational structures made possible personnel controls in the form of informal training in accounting, results controls were responsive to these personnel controls. This constructed common models of thinking, meaning that cultural controls were responsive to results controls. The responsiveness also supports generative learning, since accounting‐related training includes and introduces Western business thinking.

Originality/value

The findings show that loose couplings within management control systems may lead to generative learning due to the rules imposed by the parent company. Elaborating the dual role of accounting as an object and element of control illustrates a relationship different from the earlier view that loose coupling between parent's rules and what is locally done tends to foster local stability based on preservation of existing ways of thinking, i.e. adaptation instead of adaptability.

Details

Journal of Accounting & Organizational Change, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1832-5912

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Article
Publication date: 12 September 2016

Yancy Toh, Wei Loong David Hung, Paul Meng-Huat Chua, Sujin He and Azilawati Jamaludin

The purpose of this paper is to illustrate the dialectical interplay between centralisation and decentralisation forces so as to understand how schools leverage on its…

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1229

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to illustrate the dialectical interplay between centralisation and decentralisation forces so as to understand how schools leverage on its autonomous pedagogical space, influence the diffusion of innovations in the educational landscape of Singapore and how a centralised-decentralised system supports (or impedes) pedagogical reform for twenty-first century learning.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper first outlines the evolutionary stance of Singapore’s decentralisation from its past to present trajectories, thus providing a broader social-historical interpretation to its tight-loose-tight coupling of the education system; followed by situating the context of reform within the national narrative of Ministry of Education’s (MOE) twenty-first century competencies framework. The authors examine how school autonomy should be accompanied by systemic enabling mechanisms, through two case illustrations of whole-school reforms.

Findings

There are four carryover effects that the authors have observed: structural, socio-cultural, economic and epistemic. Middle managers from the two schools act as a pedagogical, socio-technological and financial broker outside the formal collaborative structures organised by the MOE. Such a “middle-out” approach, complemented by centralised mechanisms for “coeval sensing mechanism”, has resulted in boundary-spanning linkages and multiplier effects in terms of knowledge spillovers.

Research limitations/implications

Socio-cultural context matters; and what constitutes as co-learning between policymakers and practitioners in Singapore may be construed as policing that stifles innovations in other contexts.

Originality/value

In addition to the conceptualisation of how school autonomy may lead to school-based innovations, the paper provided some preliminary empirical evidence of how the co-production of knowledge has been engendered within, across and beyond individual Singapore schools through the mechanism of innovation diffusion. The unit of analysis is innovation ecosystem.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 30 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 19 December 2018

Jean-Paul Peronard and Jacob Brix

The purpose of this study is to consolidate existing research on ‘service networks’ and to frame this literature as a new ‘context for learning’. Research from…

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1827

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to consolidate existing research on ‘service networks’ and to frame this literature as a new ‘context for learning’. Research from inter-organizational learning is used to qualify this consolidation and advances from inter-organizational learning are used to operationalize how service network actors in this new context can organize for inter-organizational learning to create more value for themselves and their customers.

Design/methodology/approach

By conceptualizing the learning context of a service network and the interrelated dimensions, an overview of the learning challenges for improved service performance is provided.

Findings

Inspired by the service triangle, the proposed framework highlights the learning challenges among two or more actors and the knowledge and skills needed for them to organize the service network. To build a collaboration characterized by trust, behaviors associated with transparency and receptivity are argued to be imperative.

Practical implications

The framework can increase the opportunities for inter-organizational learning in a service network. Knowing the learning context and the challenges associated with this learning allows for a more accurate intervention and allocation of resources to improve service network performance.

Originality/value

The novelty lies in the consolidation of the literature of service networks and the extension of the literature on inter-organizational learning hereto.

Details

The Learning Organization, vol. 26 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-6474

Keywords

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