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Article
Publication date: 13 January 2012

Sara L. Mann, Marie‐Hélène Budworth and Afisi S. Ismaila

The purpose of this study was to examine inter‐rater agreement on counterproductive performance between self‐ and peer‐ratings, and the factors that moderate this…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study was to examine inter‐rater agreement on counterproductive performance between self‐ and peer‐ratings, and the factors that moderate this agreement. The factors investigated included self‐reported levels of counterproductive performance and known antecedents of counterproductive performance: conscientiousness and integrity values.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were gathered (three to five peer ratings per individual) from 108 undergraduate students.

Findings

The paper finds that there was a significantly low correlation between self‐ and peer‐ ratings of counterproductive performance. Ratings given by peers were much higher than ratings given by oneself. Individuals and peers who are similar in the extent to which they engage in counterproductive behaviors were in agreement with respect to ratings of counterproductive performance.

Practical implications

This study provided evidence that rater disagreement is a consistent phenomenon across dimensions of performance. In addition, rater perceptions of counterproductive performance have a significant impact on overall performance ratings; therefore individual differences between the rater and ratee may have a large influence on overall ratings in an organizational setting. There is some evidence in this study that peer ratings of counterproductive behavior vary depending on the rater's own counterproductive behaviors. The fact that rater agreement is influenced by the rater's own behavior implies that individual rater effects are influencing counterproductive performance measurement.

Originality/value

This study adds value by extending the literature on inter‐rater agreement to counterproductive performance. In addition, this study is unique in that it shows that a rater's own level of counterproductive performance can impact their ratings of others.

Details

International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, vol. 61 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0401

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Article
Publication date: 5 August 2014

Caroline Aubé and Vincent Rousseau

The purpose of this paper, building on the work of Aubé et al. (2009, 2011) who developed a four-dimension model of counterproductive behaviors in team settings, is to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper, building on the work of Aubé et al. (2009, 2011) who developed a four-dimension model of counterproductive behaviors in team settings, is to examine the team-level consequences of these behaviors. More specifically, the authors investigate the mediating role of collaboration, a key component of teamwork, in the counterproductive behaviors–team performance relationships.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a multisource approach and a team-level design, data were gathered from 101 work teams (381 members and 101 immediate supervisors). The study was conducted within a Canadian public safety organization.

Findings

Results show that the four dimensions of counterproductive behaviors are negatively related to team performance. Moreover, results indicate that each of these relationships is completely mediated by a decrease of collaboration among members. Taken together, the results of this study show that the presence of counterproductive behaviors within teams constitutes a collective phenomenon which affects not only team members, but also the functioning and effectiveness of the team as a whole.

Originality/value

This study differs from previous studies mainly by adopting a multidimensional conception of counterproductive behaviors and focusing on consequences of these behaviors on the team as a system. In practical terms, the results suggest that the presence of counterproductive behaviors may require team-level interventions (e.g. team building) in addition to individual interventions with individuals involved.

Details

Team Performance Management, vol. 20 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7592

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2021

Agnieszka Wojtczuk-Turek and Dariusz Turek

The purpose of this paper is to discuss relationships between high-performance work systems (HPWSs) and productive/counterproductive behaviours initiated and performed by…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to discuss relationships between high-performance work systems (HPWSs) and productive/counterproductive behaviours initiated and performed by employees. Using the ability, motivation and opportunities (AMO) theoretical framework, the authors described how an HPWS influences employee behaviours. The authors suggest that HPWSs could increase productive work behaviour and decrease counterproductive behaviours by mediating employees' affective commitment and moderating their self-efficacy.

Design/methodology/approach

This study is based on data from 563 questionnaires, which were completed using the computer-assisted telephone interview method. The respondents were knowledge workers, representing companies of various sizes in the Knowledge-Intensive Business Service (KIBS) sector in Poland. Statistical verification of the mediation and moderation analyses was conducted with macro PROCESS (ver. 3.3).

Findings

This research confirmed a significant statistical relationship between all examined variables. It has been shown that HPWSs influence productive and counterproductive behaviours both directly and indirectly through mediation of affective commitment. The statistical analysis also confirmed the study’s hypothesis that self-efficacy moderates relationships between an HPWS and employee behaviours.

Research limitations/implications

This study has two limitations: its cross-sectional design and the use of self-reported questionnaire data.

Originality/value

This study is the first to explore mediating mechanisms between HPWSs and employee performance in the context of the KIBS companies in Poland. The results indicate that HPWSs are important antecedents of productive and counterproductive behaviours among knowledge workers.

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Article
Publication date: 20 October 2020

Lufi Yuwana Mursita and Luciana Spica Almilia

This study aims to examine the causal relationship of subjective incentive schemes on counterproductive knowledge behavior. Besides, this study also identifies the…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the causal relationship of subjective incentive schemes on counterproductive knowledge behavior. Besides, this study also identifies the moderating role of cognitive orientation on the relationship between those two variables.

Design/methodology/approach

This study used a 2 × 2 between-subjects laboratory experiment with accounting undergraduate students as the subjects.

Findings

Subjective-based incentive schemes reduce the tendency for counterproductive knowledge behavior. Also, the collectivist cognitive orientation negatively influences the behavior. However, cognitive orientation does not act as a moderator in the causal relationship of incentive schemes and counterproductive knowledge behavior.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this study is the first that investigates and finds the effect of inclusion of subjectivity in incentive schemes and the level of individual’s collectivism on the reluctance to share knowledge in the workplace. This study has also strived to reduce an overlapping between the concept of knowledge sharing and counterproductive knowledge behavior by applying the right basic concept during the experiment.

Details

International Journal of Ethics and Systems, vol. 37 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2514-9369

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Article
Publication date: 17 October 2016

Nale Lehmann-Willenbrock, Joseph A. Allen and Dain Belyeu

Employees at all organizational levels spend large portions of their work lives in meetings, many of which are not effective. Previous process-analytical research has…

Abstract

Purpose

Employees at all organizational levels spend large portions of their work lives in meetings, many of which are not effective. Previous process-analytical research has identified counterproductive communication patterns to help explain why many meetings go wrong. This study aims to illustrate the ways in which counterproductive – and productive – meeting behaviors are related to individual work engagement and emotional exhaustion.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors built a new research-based survey tool for measuring counterproductive meeting behaviors. An online sample of working adults (N = 440) was recruited to test the factor structure of this new survey and to examine the relationships between both good and bad meeting behaviors and employee attitudes beyond the meeting context.

Findings

Using structural equation modeling, this study found that counterproductive meeting behaviors were linked to decreased employee engagement and increased emotional exhaustion, whereas good meeting behaviors were linked to increased engagement and decreased emotional exhaustion. These relationships were mediated via individual meeting satisfaction and perceived meeting effectiveness.

Research limitations/implications

The study findings provide a nuanced view of meeting outcomes by showing that the behaviors that people observe in their meetings connect not only to meeting satisfaction and effectiveness but also to important workplace attitudes (i.e. employee engagement and emotional exhaustion). In other words, managers and meeting leaders need to be mindful of behavior in meetings, seek ways to mitigate poor behavior and seek opportunities to reward and encourage citizenship behavior.

Originality/value

This study shows how good and bad meeting behaviors relate to employee perceptions of meeting effectiveness and individual job attitudes. The authors develop a science-based, practitioner-friendly new survey tool for observing counterproductive meeting behavior and offer a juxtaposition of good and bad meeting behaviors in a single model.

Details

Management Research Review, vol. 39 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8269

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Article
Publication date: 6 May 2014

Dennis R. Self and Terry B. Self

The purpose of this article is to encourage organizations to recognize the potential risks of retaining counterproductive employees on their payrolls and the steps they…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this article is to encourage organizations to recognize the potential risks of retaining counterproductive employees on their payrolls and the steps they should take to prevent and/or correct the situation should it exist within their organizations.

Design/methodology/approach

Literature examining a broader definition of the negligent retention doctrine, which includes employees who lack the qualifications for the positions they hold, those who are nonperformers, and/or those who exhibit toxic behaviours, and the consequences for retaining these counterproductive employees on the payroll. By using a multilayered approach, the article discusses the efforts organizations can use to identify potentially counterproductive employee behaviour and the steps the organizations should take to provide appropriate developmental strategies/programs to assist counterproductive employees, as well as, provide appropriate disciplinary action, as the situation dictates.

Findings

The review highlights the potential financial drain and performance threats counterproductive employees create for organizations; offers explanations as to why counterproductive employees are often allowed to stay on the payroll; and provides suggestions for preventing the selection of counterproductive employees, for providing appropriate developmental.

Practical implications

The article offers practical insights and suggestions to organizations that are interested in upholding their fiduciary responsibility to their stakeholders, while providing counterproductive employees opportunity to improve their performance/behaviours or to exit the organization.

Originality/value

The article expands the definition of the negligent retention doctrine to include the often-ignored financial and emotional dangers of retaining unfit or counterproductive employees on the payroll.

Details

International Journal of Law and Management, vol. 56 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-243X

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Book part
Publication date: 25 July 2008

Nikolaos Dimotakis, Remus Ilies and Michael K. Mount

Intentional negative behaviors, under their various conceptualizations, have developed into a major area of study in the literature. Previous research has provided many…

Abstract

Intentional negative behaviors, under their various conceptualizations, have developed into a major area of study in the literature. Previous research has provided many interesting and valuable examinations of this phenomenon, examining a variety of factors such as individual differences, exogenous influences and affective and cognitive reactions to experienced events. Most of these approaches, however, have been limited by relatively static conceptualizations of intentional negative behaviors and their antecedents. After reviewing the previous literature, we offer an alternative, dynamic view of discrete episodes of said behaviors, and outline the ways in which this approach could help advance the field and address some of the limitations of previous research.

Details

Research in Personnel and Human Resources Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-004-9

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Article
Publication date: 4 November 2013

LaDonna M. Thornton, Terry L. Esper and Michael L. Morris

– The purpose of this research is to investigate the dynamics and dimensions of behaviors of supply chain employees that may impede the success of supply chain relationships.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research is to investigate the dynamics and dimensions of behaviors of supply chain employees that may impede the success of supply chain relationships.

Design/methodology/approach

A grounded theory qualitative method was used to explore the concept of counterproductive work behavior in a supply chain context.

Findings

Through analysis and evaluation of the data, five key supply chain counterproductive work behaviors (avoiding, withholding, emoting, confounding, and shifting) emerged. Overall, these behaviors are associated with perceived contract breaches, which undermines trust within supply chain relationships.

Research limitations/implications

This work provides a basis for researchers to explore counterproductive work behaviors within supply chain management and managers to consider these behaviors in relational exchange. Future research can build on the insights provided here by applying quantitative methods to exploring the phenomenon and investigating counterproductive behaviors from the actor's perspective.

Originality/value

This research provides an overarching framework for relationship management behaviors that may detract from supply chain relationships. Research has previously explored these types of behaviors in a segmented fashion. This work takes a comprehensive look at behaviors and through evaluation of the data, relational and informational contract breaches emerge. The data suggests these contract breaches may undermine the trust within supply chain relationships.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 43 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 25 October 2018

I.M. Jawahar, Bert Schreurs and Shawn J. Mohammed

In spite of the recent meta-analysis by Martin et al. (2016), we have very little insight about the theoretical mechanism explaining the leader–member exchange…

Abstract

Purpose

In spite of the recent meta-analysis by Martin et al. (2016), we have very little insight about the theoretical mechanism explaining the leader–member exchange–counterproductive work behavior (LMX–CWB) relationship. Drawing on social cognitive theory, the purpose of this paper is to test if occupational self-efficacy functions as a mediating mechanism to explain the relationship between LMX quality and counterproductive performance directed toward the supervisor. In addition, based on the conservation of resources theory, the paper investigates if supervisor–subordinate relationship tenure acted as a second-stage moderator of this mediated relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors used two-wave time-lagged data from a sample of 189 high-tech professionals to test the hypotheses, controlling for age, sex, and trust.

Findings

The results of this paper showed that occupational self-efficacy carried the effect of LMX quality on counterproductive performance, but only for workers who have longer supervisor–subordinate relationship tenure.

Originality/value

This paper is unique in proposing and testing a social cognitive mechanism to explain the relationship between LMX quality and counterproductive performance. As Johns (2017) advocated, the authors incorporated length of time, a contextual variable into this study by investigating supervisor–subordinate relationship tenure as moderating the proposed mediated relationship.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 23 no. 6/7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

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Article
Publication date: 19 January 2021

Dirk De Clercq, Yasir Mansoor Kundi, Shakir Sardar and Subhan Shahid

This research unpacks the relationship between employees' perceptions of organizational injustice and their counterproductive work behaviour, by detailing a mediating role…

Abstract

Purpose

This research unpacks the relationship between employees' perceptions of organizational injustice and their counterproductive work behaviour, by detailing a mediating role of organizational identification and a moderating role of discretionary human resource (HR) practices.

Design/methodology/approach

The hypotheses were tested with a sample of employees in Pakistan, collected over three, time-lagged waves.

Findings

An important reason that beliefs about unfair organizational treatment lead to enhanced counterproductive work behaviour is that employees identify less strongly with their employing organization. This mediating role of organizational identification is less salient, however, to the extent that employees can draw from high-quality, discretionary HR practices that promote their professional development and growth.

Practical implications

For management practitioners, this study pinpoints a key mechanism – the extent to which employees personally identify with their employer – by which beliefs about organizational favouritism can escalate into purposeful efforts to inflict harm on the organization and its members. It also reveals how this risk can be subdued by discretionary practices that actively support employees' careers.

Originality/value

This study adds to previous research by detailing why and when employees' frustrations about favouritism-based organizational decision making may backfire and elicit deviant responses that likely compromise their own organizational standing.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

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