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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1998

Lalit M. Johri and Kanokthip Sahasakmontri

Use of traditional cosmetics and toiletries manufactured from herbs and plant extracts has been popular in many Asian countries. However, green marketing of these products…

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Abstract

Use of traditional cosmetics and toiletries manufactured from herbs and plant extracts has been popular in many Asian countries. However, green marketing of these products is rather recent. Encouraged by the growing environmental consciousness on the part of citizens and a growing market for cosmetics and toiletries, several global and local companies have entered Thailand. An international company, The Body Shop, and a local company, Oriental Princess, have employed green marketing strategies to build their customer base in the Thai market. Using case research method and questionnaire‐based surveys, an attempt has been made in this paper to analyze the green marketing strategies of these companies and their impact on consumer attitudes and brand loyalty. The research shows that that the two companies have made honest attempts to adopt green marketing strategies. However, Thai customers consider non‐green attributes more important in making their purchase decisions. The two case companies have been able to create favorable attitudes and enjoy a high degree of brand loyalty.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1996

Andrea Prothero

Examines the array of areas within society that are having an impact and are likely to be affected by transition to a new, green world. Focuses on a research project…

5345

Abstract

Examines the array of areas within society that are having an impact and are likely to be affected by transition to a new, green world. Focuses on a research project currently under way in the cosmetics and toiletries industry, examining the impact of environmentalism on this industry; discusses specifically the role of marketing. Considers reasons for adopting a case‐based research methodology and explores the research questions adopted in the study. Discusses one of the case companies, placing emphasis on the research issues raised in the study.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 14 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

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Article
Publication date: 9 March 2015

Azmawani Abd Rahman, Ebrahim Asrarhaghighi and Suhaimi Ab Rahman

The purpose of this paper is to add to the body of knowledge about attitude and intention to choose a Halal product. Despite the importance of the Halal cosmetic market…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to add to the body of knowledge about attitude and intention to choose a Halal product. Despite the importance of the Halal cosmetic market for both producers and consumers, the existing literature focusses on Halal food products, and only a limited number of studies exist about Halal cosmetic products. This study assesses the effects of knowledge and religiosity on attitudes towards Halal cosmetics products, as well as the effect of those attitudes on the intention to buy the Halal cosmetic products. This study also investigates the existence of differences between consumers’ attitudes towards Halal cosmetics and Halal food products.

Design/methodology/approach

This study used a self-administrated questionnaire with closed-ended questions. The questionnaire was distributed using non-probability convenience sampling. At the end of data collection period, a total of 110 usable questionnaires from Muslim respondents over the age of 18 years old were used for further analysis. To assess the relationship between knowledge, religiosity, attitude and intention, a structural equation modeling technique was used. And to investigate the difference between attitude and intention for Halal cosmetic and Halal food products, the pair sample t-test were applied.

Findings

The findings of the study show that the relationship between knowledge and attitude is insignificant, but there is a significant positive relationship between religiosity and attitude. From the lens of theory of reasoned action (TRA), this study indicates that there is a positive relationship between attitude and intention to choose Halal cosmetic products. This study also found a significant difference between consumers’ attitudes towards Halal cosmetics and attitudes towards Halal food products, as well as consumers’ intentions to choose Halal cosmetics and intentions to choose Halal food products among Malaysian consumers. Moreover, the results indicate that Malaysian consumers have more positive attitudes and intentions towards Halal food products than towards Halal cosmetic products.

Research limitations/implications

Because the sample of the study is limited to consumers from one country (Malaysia), it is suggested that the future studies choose their samples from consumers in different countries.

Practical implications

The results of the study give implication to firms competing in the cosmetic industry. Religiosity is one of the main factors that should be taken into account in promoting their cosmetic products. Also, as the relationship between attitude and intention to choose Halal cosmetics is similar to the relationship for Halal foods, marketers may try similar ways to promote both the products. However, the attitude and intention to choose Halal cosmetics is still lower than Halal foods.

Social implications

The result of this study provides an insight for the Malaysian consumers to realize whether knowledge and religiosity have any relationship towards consumers’ attitudes towards Halal cosmetic products. The results also provide information to consumers that they are more likely to have stronger attitudes towards Halal food products than the cosmetic products. This study will be significant to the consumers, the importer and exporter, the producer and marketer and the researcher as well as the government.

Originality/value

This study is the first study which has assessed the antecedents and consequence of consumers’ attitude towards Halal cosmetic products in one model. Moreover, this research is among the first attempts to investigate the significant difference in Malaysian consumers’ attitude and intention between Halal cosmetic and food products.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

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Article
Publication date: 10 July 2007

Rajagopal

Many multinational companies have entered the market of organic cosmetics and toiletries (OCT) in the global marketplace. This study attempts to analyze the impact of…

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Abstract

Purpose

Many multinational companies have entered the market of organic cosmetics and toiletries (OCT) in the global marketplace. This study attempts to analyze the impact of economic and relational variables on customer and brand values in reference to OCT products in Mexico through empirical investigation in selected department stores that attract high profile customers. The study proposes a framework for future research in measuring the customer value in specific reference to the non‐conventional products.

Design/methodology/approach

This study is based on the primary data using the information of 369 respondents, who were involved in shopping at chosen retail self‐service stores in Mexico City, administering a semi‐structured questionnaire. The study was conducted in 11 retail self‐service stores in Mexico City including four departmental stores spread over three locations in Mexico. The data has been fit to the model developed for the study using linear equations. One of the prominent features emerged during the study is that customer perception is largely governed by marketing communications.

Findings

The study reveals that strategic product positioning and effective retailing augment the customer perceptions and help building the long‐run customer values towards the non‐conventional products owning unfamiliar brands. Results of empirical data have also shown that advertising and promotional strategies of the OCT brands helped customers review their preferences against the synthetic cosmetics and toiletries which appreciated the brand value for the OCT products of the companies in Mexican market.

Research limitations/implications

Like many other empirical studies this research might also have some limitations in reference to sampling, data collection and generalization of the findings. Samples drawn for the study may not be enough to generalize the study results. Open ended questions were answered by the Mexican respondents in Spanish and sometimes transcription of the audio might have overlooked some issues. However, to ensure that the data cover a wider spatial and temporal dimensions in the study region, data should be cleansed and filtered with many variability factors affecting the consumer behavior and retailer performance.

Originality/value

Marketing of organic cosmetics encouraged by the growing environmental consciousness among the customers, is a recent phenomenon in the business. However, there is paucity of literature on this subject particularly in reference to Latin America. Hence, this paper attempts to contribute to the existing studies.

Details

International Journal of Emerging Markets, vol. 2 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-8809

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Article
Publication date: 9 May 2008

Michelle Guthrie, Hye‐Shin Kim and Jaehee Jung

This paper seeks to examine women's perceptions of brand personality in relation to women's facial image and cosmetic usage. This study seeks to develop a better…

16182

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to examine women's perceptions of brand personality in relation to women's facial image and cosmetic usage. This study seeks to develop a better understanding of how various factors influence perceptions of cosmetic brands.

Design/methodology/approach

An electronic survey was administered to a sample of 225 female participants at a mid‐Atlantic university in the USA. The survey included items measuring facial image, cosmetic usage, brand personality, and brand attitude. Multiple regression analyses were conducted to determine the relationship among variables.

Findings

While the brand personality of competence was found to be important across all three brands, consumer perceptions pertaining to the remaining brand personality traits differed. This study found that consumers' facial image influenced the total quantity of cosmetics used but not the variation in quantity in different situations. Results also indicate that a relationship exists between facial image and brand perceptions. Also, it was found that a different group of brand personality traits influenced brand attitude for each cosmetic brand.

Research limitations/implications

By examining how facial image and cosmetic usage determine brand perceptions, companies can improve their marketing strategies to enhance customer satisfaction and increase their customer base. Moreover, by identifying the brand personalities that attract consumers, companies can pin‐point the characteristics customers look for in a product, which in turn can be used to enhance brand image. Further research on different age groups and cultures should be conducted to better understand cosmetic consumers.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the body of knowledge in the area of consumer behavior and cosmetics. From this study, a better understanding of cosmetic consumers is gained and the results provide brand marketers with valuable information.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

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Abstract

Details

Strategic Marketing Management in Asia
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-745-8

Article
Publication date: 9 March 2015

Isabelle Aoun and Laurent Tournois

Branding in faith-based consumer markets, in which marketing practices, religion, and consumption intersect, is largely unexplored. The purpose of this paper is to…

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Abstract

Purpose

Branding in faith-based consumer markets, in which marketing practices, religion, and consumption intersect, is largely unexplored. The purpose of this paper is to investigate how brands integrate religious concerns into their strategies through Halal branding. The central logic of authors’ view is that branding applied in a particular consumer market (i.e., Muslim) could enrich dominant (Western) branding theory.

Design/methodology/approach

Although challenging, qualitative research offers a valuable lens in international marketing research in allowing researchers to study organizations and contexts in their natural settings, enabling a more holistic approach, instead of imposing one’s culturally informed pre-conceptions (Boyacigiller and Adler, 1991). In this regard, a multiple case study approach considering Halal cosmetic brands is used. A replication logic is applied in interpreting the data.

Findings

Holistic branding is a broader concept than what mainstream theory acknowledges; brand attributes go beyond the functional and emotional, offering insights into a spiritual dimension. The proposed model identifies attributes that reflect the brand’s worldview and contribute to holistic branding: spiritual ethos and belief system, sustainable and eco-ethical philosophy, wholesomeness and inclusiveness.

Research limitations/implications

This exploratory research represents the initial step for faith-based/Halal branding; the discussion is confined to the cases under study. The results are not conclusive and require further empirical research to validate their broader applicability.

Practical implications

The study highlights the need for a comprehensive approach to branding of faith-based products. The Halal market (cosmetics and toiletries) may be attractive to companies that seek to widely develop products targeting faith-based Muslim consumer markets.

Originality/value

The study contributes to an area of growing concern from an academic point of view (i.e. Halal branding) by proposing to add a spiritual dimension to holistic branding. Several questions remain and should stimulate further research. Hence, researchers would be able to understand more clearly the meaning of the religious environment and the impact that environmental forces are likely to exert on business decisions.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2006

This article describes the dramatic turn‐around achieved at a UK toiletries and cosmetics plant which, once faced with closure, is now described by Procter & Gamble as one

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Abstract

Purpose

This article describes the dramatic turn‐around achieved at a UK toiletries and cosmetics plant which, once faced with closure, is now described by Procter & Gamble as one of its best suppliers, with a P&G audit score of 100 percent.

Design/methodology/approach

Concentrates on the role of training in changing the organizational culture at Creative Outsourcing Solutions International Ltd's manufacturing site at Littlehampton, West Sussex, UK.

Findings

Details how, as a result of the training, the confidence of employees has increased and it has become normal practice for employees to be involved in decision making and problem solving. The company has increased its customer base and turnover, and reduced its inventory by 53 percent.

Practical implications

Demonstrates that the company has established training and learning as part of the solution and not a luxury, and has more employees who can participate in and drive improvement initiatives.

Originality/value

Shows how the training has created a solid foundation for learning on the site.

Details

Human Resource Management International Digest, vol. 14 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0967-0734

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 24 November 2016

Bettysa Dornelas, Felipe Esteves and Jorge Carneiro

The purpose of this chapter is to offer instructors and students a real managerial dilemma faced by a large Brazilian company in the cosmetics industry as it ventures into…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this chapter is to offer instructors and students a real managerial dilemma faced by a large Brazilian company in the cosmetics industry as it ventures into the European arena after successful expansion in Latin America.

Methodology/approach

This is a teaching case for use in class discussion about the advantages and disadvantages of certain courses of internationalization, in particular, standardization versus adaptation of the marketing mix, the choice of entry and operation modes, and the management of international acquisitions.

Findings

Since this is a teaching case, there are no “findings” in the usual sense of the word related to traditional empirical studies.

Research limitations/implications

Data for the case came mainly from the manifested perspectives of the company’s Vice-president of International Operations, complemented by the opinions of the company’s Senior Manager of Strategic Planning and of a business analyst of the cosmetic industry, which has been following the company for years. Such data may reflect the particular views of these actors. The authors also used public secondary data from the company’s presentations to the public, consulting companies, and business magazines. Although these accounts may be partial, this is not a severe limitation since a teaching case is expected to provide some information, but not a full set of information, in order to reflect better the real context of managerial decisions.

Practical implications

This teaching case study can help students reflect upon a real managerial dilemma related to international expansion of a firm into psychically distant markets.

Originality/value

This teaching case discusses how an emerging market firm can challenge strong incumbents in developed markets and find a viable positioning, based on a distinctive sales model and value proposition for customers.

Details

The Challenge of Bric Multinationals
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-350-4

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1999

Pervaiz K. Ahmed and Mohamed Zairi

Notes that benchmarking is an under‐utilised tool in the field of innovation. Examines consumer brands in the UK cosmetics and toiletries sector and attempts to use both…

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Abstract

Notes that benchmarking is an under‐utilised tool in the field of innovation. Examines consumer brands in the UK cosmetics and toiletries sector and attempts to use both soft and hard metrics in terms of benchmarking measurement. Considers various types of benchmarking approach and also the nature of both “hard” and “soft” measurement. Focuses on numerous factors relating to brands, using data from the cosmetics and toiletries sector. Concludes by underlining the need for organizations to pay attention to both quantitative and qualitative dimensions if benchmarking is to be effective.

Details

European Journal of Innovation Management, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-1060

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1 – 10 of 354