Search results

1 – 10 of over 6000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 8 July 2021

Vít Hinčica, Hana Řezanková and Jingyi Qi

The aim of the paper is to explore how Chinese consumers perceive the quality of cosmetics products and if the Chinese youth differs in the perception from older…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of the paper is to explore how Chinese consumers perceive the quality of cosmetics products and if the Chinese youth differs in the perception from older generations. The paper fills the current research gap in revealing which intrinsic and extrinsic parameters are the most and least associated with cosmetic products’ quality by young and older Chinese consumers. It also inquiries about how other selected factors (e.g. type of store, store’s trade name, the use of influencers, etc.) contribute to the perceived quality of cosmetic products.

Design/methodology/approach

Primary data were collected from 423 Chinese respondents by an online questionnaire in their native language. Statistical tests of independence, correlation and cluster analysis were applied to reveal the relationships between variables.

Findings

The highest number of statistically significant dependencies of meritorious variables was associated with age groups of young and older consumers, thus suggesting greater differences in quality perception between younger and older Chinese generations. The paper also confirms that intrinsic cues prevail over extrinsic when consumers evaluate the quality of cosmetic products.

Practical implications

The results deepen the understanding of the current preferences of Chinese consumers of cosmetic products when assessing the quality of cosmetics and represent a solid basis for further research. Moreover, they may help companies from the cosmetics industry better comprehend how different categories of people determine cosmetic products’ quality.

Originality/value

The paper uses a large convenience sample of respondents from different Chinese regions and points to several differences between younger and older generations of Chinese consumers of cosmetics.

Details

Young Consumers, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-3616

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 10 May 2021

Cindy G. Grappe, Cindy Lombart, Didier Louis and Fabien Durif

Animal welfare is increasingly favoured by consumers in their choice of food and cosmetic products, proposed by manufacturers and retailers. This study aims to investigate…

Abstract

Purpose

Animal welfare is increasingly favoured by consumers in their choice of food and cosmetic products, proposed by manufacturers and retailers. This study aims to investigate the impact of the “not tested on animals” claim on consumers' attitude and behavioural intention towards a cosmetic product through an enriched version of Ajzen's theory of planned behaviour.

Design/methodology/approach

A between-subjects design has been used. 450 participants were recruited through the social network of a cosmetics and personal hygiene brand in Quebec, Canada, and answered a questionnaire. They were randomly assigned to either a manipulation group (n = 226) or a control group (n = 224). Data were analysed with partial least squares structural equation modelling.

Findings

This study shows that external (credibility and attitude towards marketing claims) and internal psychological variables (subjective norms and altruistic concerns with animal welfare) influence attitude towards and purchase intention of “not tested on animals” personal care products. More egotistic concerns, such as personal appearance, also explain the formation of attitude towards cruelty-free cosmetics.

Research limitations/implications

This research supplements Ajzen's original model with internal psychological (individuals' concerns with animal welfare and personal appearance) and external (general credibility of cosmetic products claims, credibility of the “not tested on animals” claim and attitude towards this claim) variables. These variables, as suggested by previous research on cosmetics and their claims, improve the understanding of consumer attitude and purchase behaviour patterns.

Practical implications

The study's findings point out the role of companies to increase consumers' knowledge on the significance and transparency of their messages, notably the “not tested on animals” claim. They also stress that policymakers in regions where regulation is unclear should at least punish untruthful communication pertaining to animal testing in cosmetic and personal care products.

Originality/value

Prior studies on cosmetic products did not investigate the difference of consumer attitude formation towards cruelty-free products compared to conventional cosmetic products. Consequently, this research shows that the construction of attitude towards cruelty-free products highly differs from conventional personal care.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 24 March 2021

Mohammad Mominul Islam

This study aims to reveal how consumers and shoppers are negative toward alcohol, animal fat, producers and certification issues concerned with halal cosmetics products.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to reveal how consumers and shoppers are negative toward alcohol, animal fat, producers and certification issues concerned with halal cosmetics products.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 527 students of 4 public universities and a medical college across Bangladesh took part in a survey and 150 shoppers from 2 cities participated in the face to face interview with the structured questionnaires. Frequency distribution was used for categorical and numerical data, and the chi-square test with a binary logistic regression model has tested the association between gender and attitudes toward halal cosmetics. Besides, narratives of Sharīʿah regarding alcohol, meat, fat and halal certification have helped understand the halal issue.

Findings

In total, 83% of the respondents perceived negative attitudes against haram animal fat followed by alcohol (74%) and animal fat (64%). The chi-square test shows that consumers held a significant association toward haram animal fat, (p-value 0.000) alcohol, (p-value 0.000) non-Muslim producers (p-value 0.000) and non-Muslim countries (p-value 0.026). Imperatively, the binary logistic regression model has found a significant negative association to haram animal fat (ß2 −0.295) and alcohol (ß1 −0.200).

Practical implications

Marketers ought to avoid haram animal fat in halal cosmetics besides focusing on alcohol freeness. Also, non-Muslim marketers need to be extra cautious in showcasing their identities. However, Islamic marketers will enjoy a competitive advantage in the halal market because of their demographic factors.

Social implications

Islamic principles on alcohol, meat, fat and certification potentially can help other stakeholders sense the halal norms.

Originality/value

This study has blended the elements of Sharīʿah with empirical evidence to shed light on the fundamental and trust factors for the marketing of halal cosmetics products.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 22 November 2012

Chihling Liu, Debbie Keeling and Margaret Hogg

Purpose – Whilst everyday consumption, such as of cosmetics, creates meanings for our being-in-the-world, these meanings appear to be easily over-looked and conceal…

Abstract

Purpose – Whilst everyday consumption, such as of cosmetics, creates meanings for our being-in-the-world, these meanings appear to be easily over-looked and conceal untapped significance from the experiencing individuals. This study addresses this opportunity for exploring selves in daily transformation, studying cosmetics consumption across key developmental phases of everyday life.

Design/methodology/approach – Phenomenological interviews were employed to investigate individuals' feelings, perceptions and experiences of cosmetics consumption. An iterative process of hermeneutical interpretation was adopted to identify the constellation of past-present-future relations that have underscored the individuals' intentions, motives and purposes.

Findings – This chapter highlights the intricacies of how the self changes on a daily basis. We illustrate how consumers use cosmetic consumption, at a transformational level, to create, redefine and defend aspects of the self and, strategically, to manipulate and even attack others.

Research limitations/implications – Beyond cosmetics consumption, we provide ‘food for thought’ on this very complicated subject-how does mundane consumption potentially address issues of sense of self, and vice versa?

Originality/value – The study highlights an individual's challenges in defining the self and how cosmetics function as a coping mechanism, responding to changes occurring at varying stages of life.

Details

Research in Consumer Behavior
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-022-2

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 10 January 2020

Azila Jaini, Farzana Quoquab, Jihad Mohammad and Nazimah Hussin

In recent years, consumers are moving toward purchasing green cosmetics instead of chemical one. Plenty of cosmetics products are banned globally due to the usage of…

Abstract

Purpose

In recent years, consumers are moving toward purchasing green cosmetics instead of chemical one. Plenty of cosmetics products are banned globally due to the usage of poisonous substances such as triphenyl phosphate and petroleum. As such, it is needed to shift the conventional purchase behavior to green purchase behavior (GPB) to reduce the negative impact on the environment and health. This study aims to investigate the factors that affect GPB in the context of cosmetics products purchase. Additionally, this study examines the moderating role of electronic word-of-mouth (eWOM) in influencing such green behavior.

Design/methodology/approach

This study used value-belief-norm (VBN) theory and elaboration likelihood model as a theoretical basis. By using judgmental sampling techniques, a total of 318 usable responses were gathered through online survey. The structural equation modeling approach using partial least square (SmartPLS, version 3.7) technique was used to test the study hypotheses.

Findings

Results reveal that altruistic value and hedonic value both positively affect pro-environmental beliefs, which eventually affect consumers’ personal norms. It is found that hedonic value has a greater influence on pro-environmental belief than altruistic value. Additionally, personal norm also exerts significant influence on GPB. Data also support the mediating role of pro-environmental belief and personal norm. Moreover, the multidimensional eWOM moderates the relationship between personal norm and GPB.

Practical implications

The findings from this study provide valuable insights for marketers, academicians and practitioners about the drivers of consumers’ green cosmetics purchase behavior. It will enable marketers to develop better strategies for the green market segment.

Social implications

The study findings also contribute to the social aspects by understanding consumers’ purchase behavior toward green cosmetics products. It ultimately promotes to consider a healthier lifestyle and to be concerned about environmental well-being.

Originality/value

This study is the first to introduce the eWOM as a moderator in the VBN theory. Moreover, this study contributes to the existing body of knowledge in the field by examining few new linkages; more specifically, considering pro-environmental belief as to the mediator between “hedonic value and personal norm,” as well as the mediating effect of personal norm in the relationship between “pro-environmental belief and GPB.” Moreover, this is a pioneer study to consider eWOM as a multidimensional construct rather than unidimensional, which is new in green marketing literature.

Details

International Journal of Pharmaceutical and Healthcare Marketing, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6123

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 July 2020

Nasreen Khan, Abdullah Sarwar and Booi Chen Tan

Halal cosmetic products are considered as innovation and revolution in the cosmetic industry as they offer high-quality products that follow the halal compliance and meet…

Abstract

Purpose

Halal cosmetic products are considered as innovation and revolution in the cosmetic industry as they offer high-quality products that follow the halal compliance and meet the strict scientific guidelines. However, halal cosmetic brands are still facing challenges in their positioning and are unable to identify how to encourage customers to buy. Although there is an increasing awareness towards the use of halal cosmetics among the Generation Y consumers, the factors that might stimulus their purchase intention of halal cosmetics is still ambiguous. Besides, there is a lack of well-established study on the role of religious belief as a predictor to Generation Y consumers’ purchase intention. To address the gap, this study aims to propose a model to reveal the distinctive factors that influence the purchase intention of halal cosmetics among Generation Y in Malaysia.

Design/methodology/approach

The population for this study consisted of Generation Y consumers. A closed-ended questionnaire was used for data collection from a sample of 262 respondents. The proposed model was tested using partial least squares structural equation modelling.

Findings

This study discovered that ingredient safety followed by the halal logo is very important predictor for the purchase intention of halal cosmetic products among Generation Y consumers. Unexpectedly, this study finds that religious belief plays the least important role in purchase intention.

Research limitations/implications

This study fills the gap in the theory of planned behaviour (TPB) by improving its limitation through considering the unbiased determinant of behaviour i.e. religious belief.

Practical implications

This study recommends cosmetics companies to position their products based on the importance of safety ingredient with halal logo as unique attributes of the product. It also suggests marketers to understand the right promotion strategy to be used in targeting the right market segment.

Originality/value

TPB is only based on cognitive processing and it ignores one’s needs/motivations prior to engaging in certain behaviour. Hence, this study looks into religious belief as a means of motivation and one of the important determinants of TPB.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 3 April 2020

Joseph Kaswengi, Mbaye Fall Diallo, Houcine Akrout and Pierre Valette-Florence

This study investigates how price, promotion and consumer characteristics affect consumer choice of high over medium- and low-equity cosmetic brand under different…

Abstract

Purpose

This study investigates how price, promotion and consumer characteristics affect consumer choice of high over medium- and low-equity cosmetic brand under different macroeconomic conditions.

Design/methodology/approach

The study uses purchase records from MarketingScan's Behaviour Scan panels (a GFK – Mediametrie Company) covering the period from 2008 to 2009. The panel analysed represents a sample of 2,149 households representative of the national population.

Findings

Results indicate that regular price and relative brand price increase high-equity cosmetic brand choice over both low- and medium-equity brands, while reference price decreases it. Brand feature promotion activity and joint promotion positively affect high-equity cosmetic brand choice, whereas display promotion decreases it. In comparison to medium-equity cosmetic brands, gender and education slightly increase high-equity cosmetic brand choice, while age decreases it. Surprisingly, household income does not affect high-equity cosmetic brand choice. The effect of regular price decreases over worsening macroeconomic conditions. However, the effect of relative brand price decreases between low and moderate contraction periods, but increases between moderate and high contraction times. Feature promotion is effective only when the contraction is moderate, while the negative effect of display promotion is stable over time.

Originality/value

The paper underlines the moderating role of macroeconomic conditions on the relationship between pricing decisions as well as promotion activity and consumer choice of high-equity cosmetic brands.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 48 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 28 May 2020

Dwi Suhartanto, David Dean, Ira Siti Sarah, Raditha Hapsari, Fatya Alty Amalia and Tintin Suhaeni

This paper aims to assess customer loyalty towards halal cosmetics using three integrated loyalty routes of product quality, emotional attachment and religious determinants.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to assess customer loyalty towards halal cosmetics using three integrated loyalty routes of product quality, emotional attachment and religious determinants.

Design/methodology/approach

The data for this study were gathered from 457 s cosmetics customers. Variance-based structural equation modelling was applied to assess the association between product quality, emotional attachment, religiosity, customer satisfaction and customer loyalty.

Findings

This study reveals that for halal cosmetics, customer loyalty is driven more by emotional attachment and product quality than by religiosity. Further, the religiosity does not moderate the relationship between customer satisfaction and customer loyalty. Finally, this study reveals that the impact of emotional attachment and product quality on customer loyalty is partly through strengthening customer satisfaction.

Practical implications

This study provides an opportunity for halal cosmetics managers to increase customer loyalty through the development of emotional attachment and product quality. To develop customer loyalty towards their halal cosmetic products, this study suggests that halal cosmetics managers should offer high-quality products and continuously innovate their cosmetic products.

Originality/value

This is an early empirical study attempting to examine the link between religiosity and customer loyalty in halal cosmetic products.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 28 May 2020

Tanti Handriana, Praptini Yulianti, Masmira Kurniawati, Nidya Ayu Arina, Ratri Amelia Aisyah, Made Gitanadya Ayu Aryani and Raras Kirana Wandira

The purpose of this study is to analyze millennial generation purchase behavior on halal cosmetic products in Indonesia.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to analyze millennial generation purchase behavior on halal cosmetic products in Indonesia.

Design/methodology/approach

The research approach used is a quantitative approach with the research method in the form of a survey and the sampling technique using purposive sampling. The respondents in this study are 206 Muslim females of the millennial generation. Structural equation modeling (SEM) with AMOS software is used for analyzing the data of this study.

Findings

This study found that of the 11 hypotheses tested, 10 of them were accepted: H1, H2, H3, H4, H6, H7, H8, H9, H10 and H11. The accepted hypotheses are the influence of perceived value on trust, brand image on trust, brand image on attitude, religious belief on attitude, halal certification on halal awareness, trust on attitude and halal awareness on attitude. As for trust, attitude toward product, halal awareness affects the intention to purchase halal cosmetics. Moreover, H5 was not accepted, namely, the influence of religious belief on halal awareness. The findings of this study are expected to contribute to the development of marketing theory, specifically related to consumer behavior of halal cosmetic products, as well as the development of the concept of consumer behavior based on demographics, namely, the millennial generation.

Originality/value

This study is more comprehensive than previous studies, and this study is focused on the millennial generation.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 9 April 2020

Cuong Quoc Nguyen, Phuoc Tran and Minh Nguyen

The purpose of this study is to assess the factors that motivate young people’s intention to undergo cosmetic surgery in Vietnam.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to assess the factors that motivate young people’s intention to undergo cosmetic surgery in Vietnam.

Design/methodology/approach

This study applies Ajzen’s theory of planned behavior as a research model. The study is based on a quantitative method that applied exploratory factor analysis.

Findings

In total, 412 valid responses are used for the statistical analysis. The results confirm that subjective norm (SN), attitude toward cosmetic surgery and perceived behavioral control (PBC) are the main factors that motivate young people’s intention to undergo cosmetic surgery.

Originality/value

The results show the positive relationship between attitude toward cosmetic surgery, SN, PBC and intention to undergo cosmetic surgery in Vietnam.

Details

International Journal of Pharmaceutical and Healthcare Marketing, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6123

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 6000