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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2022

Attila Endre Simay, Yuling Wei, Tamás Gyulavári, Jhanghiz Syahrivar, Piotr Gaczek and Ágnes Hofmeister-Tóth

The recent advancements in smartphone technology and social media platforms have increased the popularity of artificial intelligence (AI) color cosmetics. Meanwhile, China…

Abstract

Purpose

The recent advancements in smartphone technology and social media platforms have increased the popularity of artificial intelligence (AI) color cosmetics. Meanwhile, China is a lucrative market for various foreign beauty products and technological innovations. This research aims to investigate the adoption of AI color cosmetics applications and their electronic word-of-mouth (e-WOM) intention among Chinese social media influencers. Several key concepts have been proposed in this research, namely body esteem, price sensitivity, social media addiction and actual purchase.

Design/methodology/approach

An online questionnaire design was used in this research. A combination of purposive sampling and snowball sampling of AI color cosmetics users who are also social media influencers in China yields 221 respondents. To analyze the data, this research employs Structural Equation Modelling (SEM) method via SPSS and AMOS software. A 2-step approach, Exploratory Factor Analysis (EFA) and Confirmatory Factor Analysis (CFA), is implemented to prove the hypotheses and generate the results.

Findings

1) Social media addiction is a positive predictor of AI color cosmetics usage, (2) AI color cosmetics usage is a positive predictor of actual purchase, (3) actual purchase is a positive predictor of e-WOM intention and lastly, (4) there is a full mediation effect of actual purchase.

Originality/value

This research draws on the uses and gratification (U&G) theory to investigate how specific user characteristics affect Chinese social media influencers' adoption of AI color cosmetics, as well as how this may affect their decision to purchase branded color cosmetics and their e-WOM.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 16 August 2022

Dina Fitrisia Septiarini, Ririn Tri Ratnasari, Marhanum Che Mohd Salleh, Sri Herianingrum and Sedianingsih

This study aims to examine the halal brand image, halal logo and halal awareness of non-Muslim customers on attitude and behavioral intention.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the halal brand image, halal logo and halal awareness of non-Muslim customers on attitude and behavioral intention.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses a quantitative survey approach to 400 respondents consisting of 400 non-Muslim millennials in Indonesia, Malaysia and Singapore who have to buy halal cosmetics two years later. The sampling technique is purposive sampling. The analysis technique used in this study is structural equation modeling.

Findings

This study showed that halal logo, halal awareness and halal brand image have an effect on customer attitude. Then, the halal logo, halal awareness and halal brand image have an influence on behavioral intention. The existence of this positive signal has provided a great opportunity for businesses to make profits by meeting the demand for the halal market. Consumption of halal cosmetics produced by manufacturers attracts many non-Muslim consumers because of the safety, comfort and cleanliness of product ingredients, which of them must be given by the halal product, especially for cosmetics.

Research limitations/implications

This study broadens the understanding of the attitudes and behavioral intentions of non-Muslim consumers toward halal cosmetic products. Furthermore, this research has provided a deeper interpretation of non-Muslim understanding of halal logos, halal brand images and halal awareness which have been minimal in research studies.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the literature related to the behavioral intentions of millennial non-Muslim consumers for halal cosmetics. Therefore, respondents in the study were specific, that is, non-Muslims who are millennial generation in the Indonesia, Malaysia and Singapore context.

Details

Journal of Islamic Accounting and Business Research, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0817

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 28 July 2022

Hasan Al-Banna and Syayyidah Maftuhatul Jannah

The paper aims to investigate the push, pull and mooring effects towardswitching intention to halal cosmetic products.

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to investigate the push, pull and mooring effects towardswitching intention to halal cosmetic products.

Design/methodology/approach

The rapid growth of the halal industry in Muslim and non-Muslim countries opens a new market for cosmetic companies. For Muslims, using halal cosmetics is one of the religious orders, which their behavior relies on religious values. However, consuming nonhalal cosmetic products is still popular among Muslim consumers. The data are gathered through an online self-administered questionnaire. The total sample is 220 Indonesian females with an 88% response rate. Then, partial least squares structural equation modeling is used to analyze the data.

Findings

The result showed that regret, perceived value and religious beliefs influence the switching intention behavior to use halal cosmetics products. While dissatisfaction influences regret, and the brand also influences perceived value.

Originality/value

The paper provides several factors that are still rarely investigated previously in the context of halal cosmetics literature, such as perceived value and brand image (Handriana et al., 2020). Hence, these factors contribute significantly to the intention of Muslim consumers to switch to halal cosmetics.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 22 November 2012

Chihling Liu, Debbie Keeling and Margaret Hogg

Purpose – Whilst everyday consumption, such as of cosmetics, creates meanings for our being-in-the-world, these meanings appear to be easily over-looked and conceal…

Abstract

Purpose – Whilst everyday consumption, such as of cosmetics, creates meanings for our being-in-the-world, these meanings appear to be easily over-looked and conceal untapped significance from the experiencing individuals. This study addresses this opportunity for exploring selves in daily transformation, studying cosmetics consumption across key developmental phases of everyday life.

Design/methodology/approach – Phenomenological interviews were employed to investigate individuals' feelings, perceptions and experiences of cosmetics consumption. An iterative process of hermeneutical interpretation was adopted to identify the constellation of past-present-future relations that have underscored the individuals' intentions, motives and purposes.

Findings – This chapter highlights the intricacies of how the self changes on a daily basis. We illustrate how consumers use cosmetic consumption, at a transformational level, to create, redefine and defend aspects of the self and, strategically, to manipulate and even attack others.

Research limitations/implications – Beyond cosmetics consumption, we provide ‘food for thought’ on this very complicated subject-how does mundane consumption potentially address issues of sense of self, and vice versa?

Originality/value – The study highlights an individual's challenges in defining the self and how cosmetics function as a coping mechanism, responding to changes occurring at varying stages of life.

Details

Research in Consumer Behavior
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-022-2

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 8 August 2022

Rashmi Malhotra, D. K. Malhotra and Shubha Bennur

Skincare, hair care, make-up, perfumes, toiletries and deodorants, and oral cosmetics are the main product categories of the cosmetic market. Since the early twentieth…

Abstract

Skincare, hair care, make-up, perfumes, toiletries and deodorants, and oral cosmetics are the main product categories of the cosmetic market. Since the early twentieth century, the production of cosmetics and beauty products has been controlled by a handful of multi-national corporations. COVID-19 impacted the cosmetics industry in several different and sometimes conflicting ways. This study benchmarks the performance of 20 largest cosmetics companies against their competition as well as against their previous years to analyze the impact of COVID-19. We find that only one company has consistently performed than its peers over the period of 2015–2020. We also find that average efficiency score of cosmetics companies declines in 2020 relative to 2019.

Details

Applications of Management Science
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80071-552-3

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 21 June 2022

Halimin Herjanto, Muslim Amin and Mulyani Karmagatri

This study aims to offer a holistic halal cosmetic consumption framework by describing the current knowledge about halal cosmetics and presenting new directions for future…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to offer a holistic halal cosmetic consumption framework by describing the current knowledge about halal cosmetics and presenting new directions for future research.

Design/methodology/approach

The theory, method and context–attributes, decision and outcome systematic review framework was used in this study. This study addresses the halal cosmetics literature published in the Scopus database: nonpredatory journals between 2010 and 2021.

Findings

This study found seven antecedent categories that affect four halal cosmetics consumption decisions. Those decisions led to three outcomes. In addition, behavioral theories were identified as the most frequent theory used to explain this phenomenon in personal and business settings.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first systematic review of halal cosmetics consumption. This study explores the relevant theories, contexts, methods, antecedents and consumer decisions. Therefore, this study offers important insights into this phenomenon.

Details

Journal of Islamic Accounting and Business Research, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0817

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 21 April 2022

Muhammad Yaseen Bhutto, Myriam Ertz, Yasir Ali Soomro, Mussadiq Ali Ali Khan and Waheed Ali

The purpose of this study is to develop an extended theory of planned behavior (TPB) model by adding religious commitment (RC) and self-efficacy as internal variables and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to develop an extended theory of planned behavior (TPB) model by adding religious commitment (RC) and self-efficacy as internal variables and investigating the effect of these variables on attitudes toward halal cosmetics. In addition, this study also examined the moderating role of halal literacy in the relationships between attitudes (ATT), subjective norms (SN), perceived behavioral control (PBC) and intentions to purchase halal cosmetics.

Design/methodology/approach

The method of data collection used was self-administered surveys with customers in two stores in Karachi, Pakistan, yielding 267 valid questionnaires. To guarantee validity and reliability, convergent and discriminant validity analyses were conducted, and structural equation modeling was advanced to assess the relationships between variables using smart partial least squares 3.0 software. The interaction moderation technique has been used to examine the moderating effect of halal literacy on the purchase intention (PI) of halal cosmetics.

Findings

The results show that RC and self-efficacy both significantly impact the attitudes of Gen Y. Normative beliefs also had a significant relationship with SN. Further, ATT and SN had a significant relationship with PI of halal cosmetics, while PBC was nonsignificant. Furthermore, halal literacy is found to have a positive moderating influence on ATT and PI, and SN and PI. Finally, the moderating effect of halal literacy does not exist in the relationship between PBC and PI.

Research limitations/implications

Participants’ characteristics should vary for future studies, and larger sample sizes may yield different results. It is critical for managers working in the cosmetic industry to monitor Muslim consumption patterns to develop strategies to reach Muslim consumers. This study reveals the effect of RC, self-efficacy and the moderating role of halal literacy on the behavioral attitudes of a booming market sector, which can guide marketing managers in developing more effective advertising campaigns.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to the halal consumption literature by exploring RC and self-efficacy as constructs for the very first time in the TPB model. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this study is the first to explore the influence of halal literacy on Gen Y Pakistani Muslim consumer behavioral intention toward halal cosmetic products using the TPB model. The paper offers an extended TPB model framework that may be of interest to scholars, marketers and policymakers.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 17 January 2022

Shadma Shahid, Mohammad Ashraf Parray, George Thomas, Rahela Farooqi and Jamid Ul Islam

Due to a staggering growth rate in the recent past, halal products have attained a significant attention of marketers across countries. However, marketing practitioners…

Abstract

Purpose

Due to a staggering growth rate in the recent past, halal products have attained a significant attention of marketers across countries. However, marketing practitioners seek to have detailed understanding of what drives consumers of different demographics towards this product category so as to better market and position themselves in the competitive landscape. Correspondingly, this study aims to provide insights into the Muslim women consumers’ halal cosmetics purchase behaviour and examines the variables (and their interplay) when purchasing such products.

Design/methodology/approach

The data for the study were collected through a self-administered questionnaire from 371 Muslim respondents from India. The data were analysed through structural equation modelling using AMOS 22.0 SEM software.

Findings

The findings of this study reveal that religious knowledge, religious commitment and halal certification(s) affect consumers’ actual purchase behaviour of halal cosmetics, which subsequently drives their repurchase intention. The findings further reveal a non-significant effect of religious orientation with both the actual purchase behaviour and repurchase intention towards halal cosmetics. Additionally, actual purchase behaviour of halal cosmetics is found to positively affect customers’ repurchase intentions.

Originality/value

Despite the recent growth of overall beauty industry, this particular segment of halal cosmetics has a huge potential given the phenomenal preference that Muslim consumers have shown in such niche. Therefore, this paper contributes towards examining the key factors influencing consumers purchase behaviour towards halal cosmetics in India that can be capitalized on.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 November 2021

Adlin Masood and Aisyah Zaidi

This study aims to identify and examine the growth constraints of the halal cosmetics ecosystem in which SMEs are operating in, with special focus on the situation in Malaysia.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to identify and examine the growth constraints of the halal cosmetics ecosystem in which SMEs are operating in, with special focus on the situation in Malaysia.

Design/methodology/approach

The study adopted a qualitative methodology consisting of a systematic literature review and interviews with selected consumers and policymakers. The instruments were developed based on cybernetics and a systems-based approach, which allows for the understanding of the dynamics of growth variables in the halal cosmetics ecosystem. Based on data gathered, their relationships were mapped and major growth constraints were identified.

Findings

Cybernetics and systems approach coupled with growth diagnostics framework has enabled identification of comprehensive growth constraint variables for halal cosmetics ecosystem and mapping of growth constraints (variables) in a relationships network. The study found that the enforcement activities of the National Pharmaceutical Research Agency (Cosmetics Unit) directly affect five growth constraints and is associated with three other growth constraint variables; subsequently the most binding growth constraint. The relationship network derived from the mapping of the growth constraints indicated that changes in the behaviour of any element will affect the overall operations of the ecosystem.

Research limitations/implications

While the cosmetics industry is large and varied, this study is centred on halal colour cosmetics only. The growth constraint variables studied are those chosen by researchers and other growth constraints could be studied to guide policymakers. Future research can revolve around other halal cosmetics business sectors; impact of IR4.0 technology, COVID-19 pandemic impact; crisis and risk management issues, in the halal cosmetics industry.

Practical implications

The results derived from the cybernetics analysis affirms the “outside-in” marketing perspective, thus stakeholders should continuously monitor changes in the halal cosmetics ecosystem to ensure to ensure sustainability and profitability. Small and medium enterprises (SMEs) and policymakers can initiate pre-emptive actions by conducting simulations of various situations on the halal ecosystem.

Social implications

Enabled to simulate the effect of changes to the halal cosmetics ecosystem, stakeholders are able to take intervention initiatives, safeguard accessibility to halal cosmetics and make the halal cosmetics industry sustainable.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first comprehensive research to identify the growth constraints of the halal cosmetics industry in Malaysia that focusses on three groups of stakeholders (consumers, SMEs and government institutions) concurrently. The growth constraints relationship network of the halal cosmetics ecosystem can be further used to simulate the impact of changes within the system.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 December 2021

Sarah Lefebvre and Kelly Cowart

As the cosmetic surgery industry grows and diversifies, societal beauty standards have shifted to include images of surgically enhanced bodies. With the increased use of…

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Abstract

Purpose

As the cosmetic surgery industry grows and diversifies, societal beauty standards have shifted to include images of surgically enhanced bodies. With the increased use of influencer marketing, it is important for marketers to understand consumer perceptions of these modified appearances. This paper aims to use the lens of perceived morality (PM) to investigate consumer perceptions of cosmetic surgery services and the effect of enhanced body appearance on consumer interest in an endorsed brand. Interpersonal similarity (IS) is tested as a boundary condition.

Design/methodology/approach

A mixed-methods approach was taken with a qualitative study and two online experiments. Participants were recruited through snowball sampling (NStudy 1 = 133) and Amazon Mechanical Turk (NStudy 2 = 202; NStudy 3 = 270).

Findings

The themes uncovered in the qualitative study revealed that cosmetic surgery services were acceptable when internally motivated but may signal inauthenticity. The findings of Study 2 suggested consumer interest in an endorsed brand was negatively impacted by body enhancement (BE), with PM as the underlying mechanism. Study 3 results demonstrated IS moderated this effect. The indirect effect was significant only for those low in IS.

Originality/value

This research contributes to the underexplored area of cosmetic surgery services and its role in influencer marketing. The findings extend the literature on consumer attitudes and perceptions toward these services and provides insight into the intersection of BE and morality. The contribution is notable, as marketers increasing rely on social media influencers, many of whom have undergone cosmetic surgery services and enhanced their body appearance, to promote their brands.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 36 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

Keywords

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