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Article

Graham Baldock

This paper aims to raise awareness of the potential misuse of Transparency International’s Corruption Perception Index (CPI) within the financial services industry and…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to raise awareness of the potential misuse of Transparency International’s Corruption Perception Index (CPI) within the financial services industry and outline the potential negative impact this may have on society in certain developing countries.

Design/methodology/approach

This piece of research adopted a mix-method approach across three strands; an online line anonymous survey, consisting of 24 questions, face to face interviews with 10 anti-bribery and corruption compliance officers and three focus group, one in Hong Kong, India and Mexico.

Findings

The results of the research have evidenced that there is a lack of understanding of the methodology used to compile the CPI within the financial services industry and there is a potential adverse impact if misused.

Research limitations/implications

A potential limitation was the fact that the survey was written in English yet was distributed to some countries where English was not the respondents’ first language. As such, it was accepted that there may have been context challenges or a misunderstanding of what the question asked.

Practical implications

By raising awareness of the methodology of the CPI and the advantages and disadvantages of its use, it will enable the financial service industry to better understand the implications of using such an index and the impacts of its misuse.

Social implications

This research highlights that through the potential misuse and lack of understanding of the CPI by the financial services industry this may have an adverse financial, growth and development impact on societies in low ranked countries.

Originality/value

This paper draws on a sub-set of results from a wider piece of research that was undertaken for a Professional Doctorate. This research combined academic knowledge with practitioner research skills, providing an original contribution to knowledge surrounding corruption from a more targeted focal point, particularly with input from anti-bribery and corruption compliance officers in the financial service industry.

Details

Journal of Financial Crime, vol. 28 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-0790

Keywords

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Book part

April K. Clark

Citizens are demanding better performance from governments and they are increasingly aware of the costs of poor management and corruption. In view of scarce resources and…

Abstract

Citizens are demanding better performance from governments and they are increasingly aware of the costs of poor management and corruption. In view of scarce resources and the major transformations already underway in the global economy, identification and awareness of good governance and preventing corrupt practices have become key to ensuring structural reforms and critical investments necessary for encouraging, sustaining, and enhancing economic growth and competitiveness. Political corruption severely undermines government legitimacy and weakens the development of political, economic, social, and environmental structures.

Details

Corruption, Accountability and Discretion
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-556-8

Keywords

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Article

Michel Dion

The paper aims to reveal some uncertain correlations and presumptions about corruption.

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to reveal some uncertain correlations and presumptions about corruption.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper defines corruption as a social phenomenon. It presents two basic components of that phenomenon: unreasonable preferential treatment and abuse of power. The paper addresses the moral issue that is implied in any phenomenon of corruption. The author will use the Corruption Perception Index and the Bribe Payers Index of Transparency International as well as the International Country Risk Guide, in order to check to what extent some correlations or presumptions about corruption could be reliable, at least as hypotheses.

Findings

Uncertain correlations and presumptions about corruption actually create an effect of distorted interpretation. They could cause ideological biases that distort our perception of corruption in developing and developed countries.

Research limitations/implications

The paper does not take into account the multiple expressions of gift‐giving practices around the world and the way such practices could be confused with corruption.

Practical implications

Being aware of our “presumptions” about corruption will help us to choose relevant strategies to combat corrupt practices. This study has implications for business corporations, governments and IFIs. It reveals how the awareness of such uncertainties and presumptions about corruption is related to the CSR discourse.

Originality/value

The originality of the paper is to unveil some presumptions about corruption that have not been compared with the results obtained from the Corruption Perception Index, the Bribe Payers Index and the International Country Risk Guide.

Details

Social Responsibility Journal, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-1117

Keywords

Content available
Article

Salvador Gil-Pareja, Rafael Llorca-Vivero and José Antonio Martínez-Serrano

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the impact of corruption on trade.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the impact of corruption on trade.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors estimate gravity equations with the last econometric advances on a wide sample of countries and years using three different measures of corruption. Two of them belong to the so-called perception-based indexes and the third is derived from a structural model that takes into account the causes and indicators of corruption across countries.

Findings

A negative effect of corruption on trade appears with perceptions, but it is not widespread. However, the authors find sensible evidence of the “grease the wheels” view with the structural index if low and middle income countries are implicated. Additionally, when using this measure, differences in corruption levels negatively impact trade. Both results are in line with expectations.

Originality/value

Moreover, membership in regional trade agreements does not seem to significantly alter these results.

Details

Applied Economic Analysis, vol. 27 no. 79
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2632-7627

Keywords

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Abstract

Details

Fighting Corruption in the Public Sector
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-857-5

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Abstract

Details

Understanding Intercultural Interaction: An Analysis of Key Concepts
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-397-0

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Article

Sharmila Gamlath

– The research aims to include good governance as a facet in the measurement of human development.

Abstract

Purpose

The research aims to include good governance as a facet in the measurement of human development.

Design/methodology/approach

A modified Human Development Index (MHDI) was computed by including a governance dimension computed using the six governance indicators published by the World Bank. The rankings using the new index were obtained and compared to the rankings of the United Nations Development Programme's (UNDP's) HDI.

Findings

The rank correlation of the original and modified indices was very high, but there were many big rank changes for individual countries in each HDI group. These rank changes could be largely reconciled in the light of the rankings of these countries in the Corruption Perceptions Index and the Democracy Index.

Research limitations/implications

The research considers the measurement of human development at a point in time alone and incorporates 2010 governance indicators into the 2011 HDI, which could lead to a discrepancy in time periods considered. Furthermore, the governance indicators are measures of perceptions which can be subjective. The Practical implications paper does not delve into the country-specific factors that may have caused big rank changes.

Practical implications

The paper builds a case for incorporating, or at least providing the option of including a governance dimension in the HDI.

Originality/value

The paper is a novel attempt to incorporate good governance as a dimension in the HDI. It reasserts the need for policy-makers and governments to realize that peoples' capabilities cannot be realized in the absence of good governance, and that whilst improving other facets of human development, much attention needs to be paid towards establishing good governance.

Details

Humanomics, vol. 29 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0828-8666

Keywords

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Book part

Michael Johnston

Denmark’s apparent success at controlling corruption is likely both real and more complex than it may appear. This chapter reviews a series of hypotheses about the extent…

Abstract

Denmark’s apparent success at controlling corruption is likely both real and more complex than it may appear. This chapter reviews a series of hypotheses about the extent and sources of corruption control in Denmark, emphasizing both domestic and international factors. Some possible vulnerabilities are discussed, including whether Greenland – which is usually excluded from Danish governance ratings – might introduce corruption via its mining industries, and whether the growing wind-power industry (in some senses, another extractive enterprise) might also encourage corruption. A simple data analysis, using the Gothenburg University Quality of Government Impartiality Index, suggests that small social scale, a homogeneous population, competitive politics, and extensive international connectedness might well help check Danish corruption, but relationships among the variables are complex and marked by considerable simultaneity. Denmark illustrates two subtleties often overlooked: the importance of “soft controls” – social values, a working consensus, an emphasis on fairness, and common goals – for corruption control, and the question of whether advanced market societies really control corruption or merely reduce incentives to engage in it, as a result of business-friendly policies and institutions. A final issue involves dependent variables: better indirect measures of corruption might well be obtained by gathering and benchmarking indicators of government performance.

Details

Different Paths to Curbing Corruption
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-731-3

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Article

Mike Szymanski, Ivan Valdovinos and Evodio Kaltenecker

This study aims to examine the relationship between cultural distances between countries and their scores in the Corruption Perception Index (CPI), which is the most…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the relationship between cultural distances between countries and their scores in the Corruption Perception Index (CPI), which is the most commonly used measure of corruption in international business (IB) research.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors applied fixed-effect (generalized least squares) statistical modeling technique to analyze 1,580 year-country observations.

Findings

The authors found that the CPI score is determined to a large extent by cultural distances between countries, specifically the distance to the USA and to Denmark.

Research limitations/implications

CPI is often used as a sole measure of state-level corruption in IB research. The results show that the measure is significantly influenced by cultural differences and hence it should be applied with great caution, preferably augmented with other measures.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first study to look at cultural distances as determinants of CPI score. The authors empirically test whether the CPI is culturally biased.

Details

critical perspectives on international business, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1742-2043

Keywords

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Abstract

Details

Corruption, Accountability and Discretion
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-556-8

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