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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2003

S.O. Jekayinfa, J.O. Ojediran and P.O. Okekunle

In order to evaluate the effectiveness of the corrosion prevention practices applied to agricultural equipment manufactured and used in Nigeria, it is necessary to…

Abstract

In order to evaluate the effectiveness of the corrosion prevention practices applied to agricultural equipment manufactured and used in Nigeria, it is necessary to identify the various corrosion prevention methods and specify the contribution and the efficiency of each method to corrosion protection. This paper outlines the basic corrosion prevention methods used in practice and attempts to evaluate the effectiveness of their use in relation to agricultural service in Nigeria. The results of this study indicated the use of oils, fats, waxes and lubricants on metal parts, spraying with gasoline on corrosion‐sensitive parts constituted the majority of applied corrosion protection in industries where the equipment is manufactured and/or used. The study concluded by giving practical recommendations that are essential for improving corrosion prevention in the Nigerian agricultural industry.

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Anti-Corrosion Methods and Materials, vol. 50 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0003-5599

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1997

K.W.M. Hill

In the past, the RAF’s approach to corrosion was reactive: corrosion occurred, was identified and then rectified. Such a strategy is no longer acceptable, as corrosion

Abstract

In the past, the RAF’s approach to corrosion was reactive: corrosion occurred, was identified and then rectified. Such a strategy is no longer acceptable, as corrosion rectification is costly both in terms of material and aircraft availability. More importantly, as escalating replacement costs force us to retain aircraft in service for ever‐longer periods, the threat posed to structural integrity by corrosion and repeated corrosion repairs can no longer be tolerated. Consequently, the RAF has had no option but to develop a policy of corrosion prevention. Aerospace Maintenance, Development and Support, part of Headquarters Royal Air Force Logistics Command, has therefore been actively involved with the evaluation and trialling of a range of important corrosion prevention techniques that are compatible with the RAF’s current stance. Aircraft washing and rinsing practices have been reviewed to confirm their effectiveness, and trials have shown that dehumidified air permeates readily through a full‐size airframe, reducing relative humidity and arresting the rate of corrosion. From our work we have concluded that effective washing should be supported, where possible, by freshwater rinsing, and, if a cost effective system can be developed, structural dehumidification should also be practised. Notwithstanding a policy of corrosion prevention, we know that we operate aircraft that have already accumulated corrosion damage which has to be located and recorded. Non‐destructive testing is employed widely, and the use of information derived from the process to populate structural databases is being explored. Additionally, we are involved with refining the methodologies associated with structural inspections to ensure the ongoing integrity of our ageing aircraft fleets.

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Anti-Corrosion Methods and Materials, vol. 44 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0003-5599

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Article
Publication date: 15 March 2013

B.Y.R. Surnam

The purpose of this paper is to obtain a better insight into the impact of atmospheric corrosion in Mauritius by investigating the corrosion prevention strategies used in…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to obtain a better insight into the impact of atmospheric corrosion in Mauritius by investigating the corrosion prevention strategies used in the country and determining the related costs.

Design/methodology/approach

Companies and organizations, in various industrial sectors, affected by atmospheric corrosion were selected. They were inspected and surveys were performed in order to fulfill the aim of the study.

Findings

It has been observed that extensive atmospheric corrosion problems have been encountered in the capital city, leading to the use of a range of corrosion prevention methods. However, carbon steel, which corrodes easily, is very commonly used in the country. This leads to the wide use of alkyd‐based barrier coatings. The cost of atmospheric corrosion has been found to be equal to 0.38 per cent of the GDP.

Social implications

This study is expected to raise concern on the problem of atmospheric corrosion in Mauritius and the related waste in materials.

Originality/value

This study is expected to help in adopting corrosion prevention policies and strategies in Mauritius.

Details

Anti-Corrosion Methods and Materials, vol. 60 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0003-5599

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 1969

T.L. Rama Char

The industrial expansion of the post‐war period has resulted in the development of new products and processes, specialised equipment and new materials of construction…

Abstract

The industrial expansion of the post‐war period has resulted in the development of new products and processes, specialised equipment and new materials of construction. Materials science, technology and engineering, has emerged as an independent discipline during the last decade. These changes have brought up the importance of corrosion problems and the urgency to apply preventive methods. It is probably true to say at the present time that the losses due to metallic corrosion give a fair index of the industrial prosperity of a nation. A developing country like India had to face the challenge posed by corrosion, and there is now an increasing awareness of the imperative need for corrosion research and the application of the findings to meet specific situations.

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Anti-Corrosion Methods and Materials, vol. 16 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0003-5599

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1957

The growing awareness of the need to conserve material resources is one of the most heartening features of the contemporary industrial scene. Economy of utilisation is the…

Abstract

The growing awareness of the need to conserve material resources is one of the most heartening features of the contemporary industrial scene. Economy of utilisation is the dominant theme of new processes and new industrial undertaking. The farseeing technologist and industrialist no longer think in terms of inexhaustible natural resources. One important proof of this necessary new attitude is the attention now paid to the prevention of corrosion. The increasing cost of steel and other metals has forced industry to look for proved methods and materials for protection against corrosion. The anti‐corrosion armoury now boasts a versatile range of weapons. The pressing need is to get industry to use them. This is where Corrosion Technology comes in. For over three years, with mounting success, we have preached the gospel of corrosion prevention. Now we feel that our efforts should be augmented by a Corrosion Exhibition and Convention. These events will be the principal features of National Anti‐Corrosion Week, which we are sponsoring from October 14–18 next. Details of the exhibition and convention, to be held in Westminster, London, are given on page 147.

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Anti-Corrosion Methods and Materials, vol. 4 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0003-5599

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1997

Budhi M. Suyitno and B. Sutarmadji

Many Indonesian operators generally have a tendency to keep their aircraft in service up to or even beyond their economic design goal life (EDGL). The problem that should…

Abstract

Many Indonesian operators generally have a tendency to keep their aircraft in service up to or even beyond their economic design goal life (EDGL). The problem that should be solved by the operators is how to operate those ageing aircraft safely and economically. The combination of fatigue and corrosion phenomena needs vigorously corrective action to meet airworthiness requirements, though it increases costs in maintenance. Since corrosion is a never‐ending problem, the aviation community such as designer, manufacturer, operator and the regulatory authority has an obligation to be more concerned and proactive in ensuring continuous airworthiness of the ageing aircraft. Aims to assess issues on corrosion prevention and control activities conducted by Indonesian operators, discusses all the facts and possible corrective actions and provides recommendations to maintain and ensure safe operation of ageing aircraft by controlling and preventing corrosion as well as metal fatigue.

Details

Anti-Corrosion Methods and Materials, vol. 44 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0003-5599

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 1981

Z.A. Foroulis

This paper deals with the causes and mechanisms of internal corrosion of tanks used for the storage of crude oil and distillates. Services which are considered in this…

Abstract

This paper deals with the causes and mechanisms of internal corrosion of tanks used for the storage of crude oil and distillates. Services which are considered in this paper include crude oil storage tanks, gasoline blending and/or storage tanks and storage tanks for kerosene and heavier distillates. Fixed‐roof, as well as floating‐roof tanks, are considered. Methods for corrosion prevention and control are discussed.

Details

Anti-Corrosion Methods and Materials, vol. 28 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0003-5599

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 1957

T.B. Fielden

Growing realisation of the costs and menaces of corrosion over the past two decades or more has slowly led to an increase in its study. Corrosion due to aqueous media and…

Abstract

Growing realisation of the costs and menaces of corrosion over the past two decades or more has slowly led to an increase in its study. Corrosion due to aqueous media and its prevention by water treatment has only relatively recently become a subject of study. In this article the author chiefly discusses corrosion and its prevention in boilers and their accessories.

Details

Anti-Corrosion Methods and Materials, vol. 4 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0003-5599

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 1957

D. McNeil

Although the importance of the problem of corrosion of tar stills has diminished over the past 20 years with the replacement of mild‐steel pot‐stills by continuous tube…

Abstract

Although the importance of the problem of corrosion of tar stills has diminished over the past 20 years with the replacement of mild‐steel pot‐stills by continuous tube stills, it remains a problem of some magnitude. In 1934, Mann and Parkes estimated that the average cost per ton of tar distilled due to corrosion was 4d. Considering the rise in costs of both materials and labour over the past two decades, this figure will be nearer 1s. a ton today and since, at present, rather more than a million tons p.a. are processed in pot‐stills, the cost to the industry on this score alone is of the order of £50,000 p.a. When one adds to this the cost of stoppages and plant replacements due to wastage of continuous pipe stills, which have their own corrosion problems, and the cost of alkali addition which is almost universally practised on continuous plant as a corrosion prevention measure, the total cost to the tar distilling industry almost certainly runs into six figures.

Details

Anti-Corrosion Methods and Materials, vol. 4 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0003-5599

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1956

Over two years ago the first issue of CORROSION TECHNOLOGY appeared. In the 25 issues that have followed we have published over 90 major signed articles, 250 commentary…

Abstract

Over two years ago the first issue of CORROSION TECHNOLOGY appeared. In the 25 issues that have followed we have published over 90 major signed articles, 250 commentary items, 250 abstracts of corrosion literature and hundreds of other items and features, all dealing directly or indirectly with problems of corrosion. During its comparatively short life, CORROSION TECHNOLOGY has grown up and made many contacts throughout the world. To mark the achievement of our first 24 months' publication we invited some of our friends from the worlds of science and industry to set down a few of their thoughts on corrosion matters for publication in this issue, and we are privileged to be able to print the following contributions.

Details

Anti-Corrosion Methods and Materials, vol. 3 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0003-5599

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