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Article
Publication date: 27 July 2021

Rolfe Hayden and Helen Fok

To explain the Securities anld Futures Commission of Hong Kong’s new FAQs on external electronic data storage.

Abstract

Purpose

To explain the Securities anld Futures Commission of Hong Kong’s new FAQs on external electronic data storage.

Design/methodology/approach

The article analyses the existing legal and regulatory requirements relating to the keeping of records as well as the circular and FAQs on the use of external electronic data storage. It also discusses the practical implications of the newly added FAQs.

Findings

The SFC has relaxed the requirement as regards the appointment of two Managers-In-Charge in Hong Kong for the purposes of the circular on the use of external electronic data storage. The SFC has offered more flexibility with respect to the undertaking by electronic data storage providers in the FAQs. The FAQs have also provided more certainty with respect to the approval requirements pursuant to section 130 of the SFO where non-Hong Kong affiliates are concerned.

Practical implications

The additional guidance from the SFC regarding external electronic data storage in the form of the new FAQs shows a helpful clarification in the SFC’s approach on the practical implementation of the relevant requirements under the circular on the use of external electronic data storage.

Originality/value

The article offers practical guidance in respect of the implications of the newly added FAQs on the external electronic data storage regime from experienced financial services and asset management lawyers.

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2021

Rong Wang and Katherine R. Cooper

CSR reporting is an institutionalized practice. However, institutionalization has been primarily examined in the context of limited social issues and largely restricted to…

Abstract

Purpose

CSR reporting is an institutionalized practice. However, institutionalization has been primarily examined in the context of limited social issues and largely restricted to the presence of CSR communication. The purpose of this paper is to introduce a framework to explore how institutional and organizational factors shape CSR programming in response to an emerging social issue: the global refugee crisis.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors collected corporate social responsibility (CSR) reports from Global 500 Fortune corporations between 2012 and 2017. This study uses content coding and inferential analysis to examine how industry type, headquarters location, and partnership resources are related to programming in the refugee relief efforts.

Findings

The results reveal distinctive patterns from the technology sector and European corporations, with no clear patterns identified among other corporations. The findings indicate that although CSR is an institutionalized practice, CSR program reporting offers fewer insights as to how institutionalization occurs.

Research limitations/implications

Results suggest a preliminary framework for understanding how CSR programming becomes institutionalized and provide implications for how corporations may address emerging social issues.

Originality/value

This study applies an institutional, communicative approach to the context of the recent global refugee crisis, which contributes to theory development through the examination of an emerging social issue. It also extends prior research on the institutionalization of CSR by focusing on programming in response to an emerging social issue over time and suggests the limits of prior claims of institutionalized practices.

Details

Journal of Communication Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-254X

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Article
Publication date: 13 April 2015

Hong Liu, Lu Ma and Panpan Huang

The purpose of this paper is to test the assertion that the relationship between corporation performance and organizational complexity follows an inverted U-shape curve…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to test the assertion that the relationship between corporation performance and organizational complexity follows an inverted U-shape curve, and a corporation gains the best performance when its organizational complexity fits its environmental complexity.

Design/methodology/approach

This research did not directly measure environmental complexity to verify the relationship between corporation performance and complex environment, but measured organizational complexity to subtly display the effect of the organizational complexity on the corporation performance while controlled the environmental complexity. To do so, a set of corporations that shared the similar environment was selected, and then these corporations’ performance and organizational complexity were calculated, the related hypotheses were tested empirically.

Findings

The paper proved the inverted U-shape relationship between organizational complexity and corporation performance, and also found that different corporation chooses different complex adaptive way, so the inverted U-shape relationship displays hierarchy.

Research limitations/implications

Future research should search out to calculate corporation’s environment complexity the fitness of organizational complexity for testing hypotheses.

Practical implications

The regularity of relationship between organizational complexity and corporation performance is helpful for managers to understand that a way to improve a corporation’s performance is to enhance the fitness of organizational complexity and environmental complexity.

Social implications

Organizational complexity may be competitive advantage, but excessive growth of it will be harmful.

Originality/value

Usually organizational complexity is thought of as a negative factor to corporation performance and tends to be constrained, but this research explored the role of organizational complexity to corporation performance and the findings helps managers to understand when to enhance organizational complexity and when to weaken it. The methodology of calculating the fitness of organizational complexity and environmental complexity by fixing environment is a contribution to complexity theory research.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 34 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1955

B.J.A. BARD

The National Research Development Corporation is a public Corporation set up by the Board of Trade under the Development of Inventions Act, 1948. This Act has now been…

Abstract

The National Research Development Corporation is a public Corporation set up by the Board of Trade under the Development of Inventions Act, 1948. This Act has now been amended by the Development of Inventions Act, 1954, which has somewhat broadened the Corporation's functions. The Acts are permissive; the Corporation is free to operate as it thinks fit in order to carry out its functions, subject in certain circumstances to directions from the Board of Trade, and in some cases to approval of the Board of Trade and the Lord President of the Council. It has no compulsory powers of any kind. Its function is essentially to develop and exploit, in the public interest, inventions resulting from public research; that is to say, research carried out by Government Departments and other public bodies, or any other research in respect of which financial assistance has been provided out of public funds. The Corporation may also consider inventions submitted to it from other sources, for example, private inventors, but, in general, the Corporation is likely to concern itself with private inventions only in cases where the invention is of primary importance to the public interest. The finance required for its operation is provided by the Treasury in the form of loans, the outstanding amount of which must not exceed £5 million at any one time.

Details

Aslib Proceedings, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0001-253X

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2001

Winston Spencer Waters

Analyzes the directors’ protocols in both the New York Not for Profit Corporation Law and in the New York Business Corporation Law. Examines the similarities and…

Abstract

Analyzes the directors’ protocols in both the New York Not for Profit Corporation Law and in the New York Business Corporation Law. Examines the similarities and differences existing in the directors’ roles in not for profit corporations and in business corporations. Highlights the legal responsibilities of a not for profit corporation director and warns that, despite such an assignment being voluntary and without compensation, it carries the potential for significant legal exposure if certain formalities are not kept.

Details

Corporate Governance: The international journal of business in society, vol. 1 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1472-0701

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1992

Kazuo Hiramatu

In Japanese corporations, the backgrounds of corporate accountants do not necessarily match their university majors. Under the lifetime employment system, accountants are…

Abstract

In Japanese corporations, the backgrounds of corporate accountants do not necessarily match their university majors. Under the lifetime employment system, accountants are rotated to other departments every five to ten years. Those who are rotated to the accounting department do not necessarily arrive with sufficient accounting knowledge. In addition to receiving on‐the‐job training, corporate accountants generally attend training courses offered by outside Institutions and get new knowledge to be used in practice. Some corporations belong to specific study groups, which meet periodically. The latter groups provide opportunities for establishing informal human relations with government officials and accountants of other corporations. Training is offered to newcomers, candidates for promotion, salespersons and management staff in the fields of financial analysis, cost management and accounting in general. Sometimes, the training lasts for several days in a training facility of the corporation. It is thought useful not only for utilizing the knowledge required, but for furthering relationships within the organization, as well as for the evaluation of employees through their attitudes about participation. It reflects the policy of long‐range performance evaluation. Employees are evaluated not only by sales volume, but also by their loyalty to the corporation and their contribution to the team effort.

Details

Asian Review of Accounting, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1321-7348

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Article
Publication date: 9 January 2017

Vasily Tarakanov, Alla Kalinina and Ekaterina Kryukova

The purpose of this paper is to analyze training programs for transnational corporations, educational services market, and society.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyze training programs for transnational corporations, educational services market, and society.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper consists of three components: determination of the role and meaning of training programs of transnational corporations in the system of formation of private educational resources, conduct of analysis of effectiveness of training programs of transnational corporations, and compilation of recommendations for increase of effectiveness of training programs of transnational corporations. The main method of the research is correlation analysis.

Findings

As a result of the research, the authors have come to the conclusion that training programs of transnational corporations are the foundation for the formation of private educational resources and provide significant advantages for transnational corporations, educational services market, and society on the whole.

Practical implications

The practical value of the work consists in the development of practical recommendations for increase of effectiveness of training programs of transnational corporations which could be used by them in practical activities.

Originality/value

The performed research contributes to the development of the concept of human resources, the concept of post-industrial economy, and the concept of transnational business, which causes its high theoretical significance.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 31 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 22 June 2021

Joshua Maine, Emilia Florin Samuelsson and Timur Uman

Drawing on paradox theory, this study explores how ambidextrous sustainability relates to organisational performance in hybrid organisations represented by Swedish…

Abstract

Purpose

Drawing on paradox theory, this study explores how ambidextrous sustainability relates to organisational performance in hybrid organisations represented by Swedish municipal housing corporations, and how this relationship is contingent on the organisational structure of these organisations.

Design/methodology/approach

The study relies on the data collected from Swedish municipal housing corporations. These data sources consist of a survey sent to the management team members in Swedish municipal housing corporations, financial and non-financial archival data on these corporations, interviews with the management team and board members, and observations of meetings involving the management team and board of directors at a Swedish municipal housing corporation. Quantitative data of the study were analysed using descriptive statistics, correlation analysis and linear multiple regression analysis. Qualitative data were analysed employing deductive thematic analysis and were used to illustrate and discuss the results of the quantitative analysis.

Findings

The quantitative findings show that ambidextrous sustainability, i.e. the alignment between an explorative orientation and an exploitative orientation towards sustainability, has a weakly positive relationship with financial performance and a positive relationship with social performance in hybrid organisations represented by Swedish municipal housing corporations. The study further shows that a high level of the structural element “connectedness” weakened the relationship between the ambidextrous sustainability and financial performance of the organisation in the study. In contrast, a lower level of connectedness reinforced and strengthened this relationship. Our qualitative material illustrates how the quantitative findings could be explained by the interaction between the board of directors and the management team of these hybrid organisations.

Originality/value

The study shows how ambidextrous sustainability, employed for conceptualisation of the sustainability strategy in hybrid organisations, represented by Swedish municipal housing corporations, can impact on facets of performance (i.e. financial, social and environmental) differently. The study further highlights the importance of organisational structures in these relationships in a hybrid context.

Details

Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3574

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Education Policy as a Roadmap for Achieving the Sustainable Development Goals
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-298-5

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Book part
Publication date: 10 August 2018

Matthew Lee and Christopher Marquis

A large and growing literature examines the explicit social responsibility practices of companies. Yet corporations’ greatest consequences for social welfare arguably…

Abstract

A large and growing literature examines the explicit social responsibility practices of companies. Yet corporations’ greatest consequences for social welfare arguably occur through indirect processes that shape the social fabric that sustains generosity and mutual support within communities. Based on this logic, we theorize and test a model that suggests two pathways by which large corporations affect community philanthropy: (1) through direct engagement in community philanthropy and (2) by indirectly influencing the efficacy of community social capital, defined as the relationships among community members that facilitate social support and maintenance of social welfare. Our analysis of United Way contributions in 136 US cities over the 46 years from 1952 to 1997 supports our model. We find that the presence of corporations weakens the contributions of both elite and working-class social capital on community philanthropy. Our findings thus contribute to a novel view of corporate social responsibility based on how corporations influence the social capital of the communities in which they are embedded.

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