Search results

1 – 10 of over 94000
Article
Publication date: 1 April 1986

The Nature of Business Policy Business policy — or general management — is concerned with the following six major functions:

1576

Abstract

The Nature of Business Policy Business policy — or general management — is concerned with the following six major functions:

Details

Management Decision, vol. 24 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Book part
Publication date: 18 November 2014

Rebekah D. Moore and Donald Bruce

We examine whether variations in the most fundamental aspects of state corporate income tax regimes affect state economic activity as measured by personal income, gross…

Abstract

We examine whether variations in the most fundamental aspects of state corporate income tax regimes affect state economic activity as measured by personal income, gross state product, and total non-farm employment. We focus on a variety of statutory components of state corporate income taxes that apply broadly in most U.S. states and for most multi-state corporate taxpayers. Our econometric strategy consists of a series of fixed effects panel regressions using state-level data from 1996 through 2010. Our results reveal important interaction effects of tax rates and policies, suggesting that policy makers should avoid making decisions about tax rates in isolation. The results demonstrate a relatively consistent negative economic response to the combination of high tax rates with throwback rules and heavy sales factor weights. Combined reporting has no discernible effect on personal income, GSP, or employment after controlling for tax rates, apportionment, and throwback rules. In an effort to gauge the relative impacts of tax policies on the location of economic activity, we also estimate alternative models in which each state’s economic activity is measured as a share of the national economic activity in each year. Statistically significant effects for tax rates, apportionment formulas, and throwback rules in the shares models suggest that at least some of their impact involves the movement of activity across state lines, thereby leaving open the possibility of a zero-sum game among the states.

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 12 April 2022

Umar Farooq, Mosab I. Tabash, Ahmed Abousamak and Samar Habib

Corporate firms often follow their peer firms to articulate multiple financial decisions. Among the others, trade credit policy is a vital financial decision that can…

Abstract

Purpose

Corporate firms often follow their peer firms to articulate multiple financial decisions. Among the others, trade credit policy is a vital financial decision that can impart its dynamic role in achieving financial efficiency. Therefore, the current analysis aims to assess the role of herding behavior in determining the trade credit policies of corporate firms and its relevant effect on corporate financial performance.

Design/methodology/approach

For this purpose, the financial data of 13089 nonfinancial sector firms from 50 countries are employed and the dynamic generalized method of moments (GMM) model to estimate the regression is applied.

Findings

The empirical findings first reveal that corporate firms actively mimic their peer firms regarding trade credit policies. However, this mimicking behavior hampers the financial performance due to noncompatibility with peers’ trade credit policies. Peer firms often develop such trade credit policies that are not applicable to corporate firms.

Practical implications

Mainly, the findings of the study suggest two implications. First, it highlights the peer effect in terms of trade credit patterns. Second, it elaborates an adverse effect regarding financial performance due to herding of peers’ trade credit policies.

Originality/value

This study adds new thoughts regarding herding behavior in terms of trade credit policy and its possible consequences for corporate financial performance. No study explores such a relationship.

Details

Asian Journal of Accounting Research, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2443-4175

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 May 2019

Edward Hoang and Indrit Hoxha

The purpose of this paper is to study the payout policy for public firms in different countries. The authors are interested to understand the similarities and differences…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to study the payout policy for public firms in different countries. The authors are interested to understand the similarities and differences in the behavior of firms across different countries.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors use firm-level data collected from Compustat Global for public firms across the world. The sample consists of more than 23,000 firms for the period 1990–2015 in 94 countries. The authors estimate the corporate payout in an empirical model that incorporates other corporate financing decisions, such as investment and debt policies.

Findings

The findings support recent corporate governance theory, which asserts that payout policy is influenced by investment and debt policies, and cannot be determined independently. Furthermore, the authors find that geographic/cultural/institutional variation influence the response of payout policy to other corporate financing decisions. Additional tests are presented to demonstrate the robustness of the main findings.

Research limitations/implications

The interpretation of the results for certain regions could be limited due to data availability. The authors believe the authors have a good coverage especially for countries in Asia, relative to the other regions.

Originality/value

To the best of our knowledge, this study is the first one to look at payout policy and its relationship with investment and debt policy in such a large scale of firms across the world with coverage of 94 countries and 16 years. The authors document differences in public firms’ attitudes toward payout policy according to geographic/cultural/institutional reasons.

Details

International Journal of Managerial Finance, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1743-9132

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 31 July 2009

Henrik Simonsen

The aim of this paper is to discuss a theoretical framework for increased integration of a company's communication policy, corporate language policy and corporate

3404

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to discuss a theoretical framework for increased integration of a company's communication policy, corporate language policy and corporate information portal with a view to facilitating communication management.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper draws on selected theoretical contributions on corporate language policy with special emphasis on theoretical considerations on the type of language policies developed and implemented in companies and organisations and on corporate communication with special emphasis on van Riel's common starting points. The empirical basis of the paper is a triangulation of questionnaire data, content analysis data and interview data.

Findings

The paper argues that corporate communication has not sufficiently included the operational part of a company's corporate communication. The paper makes the case for a theoretical integration framework based on van Riel's common starting points (CSPs), and argues that corporate communication also needs to include the corporate language policy and the corporate information portal, defined as a modern information directory offering communicators concrete communication data for use in concrete text production situations.

Originality/value

The paper proposes a CSP‐based theoretical integration framework and makes the case for a Holy Trinity in corporate communications based on the communication policy, the corporate language policy and the corporate information portal.

Details

Journal of Communication Management, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-254X

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 20 June 2022

Eun Jung Lee, Sungmin Kim and Yongwon Jang

This paper examines whether long-term foreign investors may force firms to use a costly dividend to mitigate inefficient managerial behavior. The authors also hypothesize…

Abstract

This paper examines whether long-term foreign investors may force firms to use a costly dividend to mitigate inefficient managerial behavior. The authors also hypothesize that the relation between foreign investment horizons and payout policy depends upon the extent of the corporate governance. The authors find that firms held by long-term foreign investors make dividend more often in the subsequent years. The authors also find that foreign investors with long-term investments do not cause firms to pay dividends when firms have strong corporate governance. It suggests that long-term foreign investors serve as a substitute for strong corporate governance with respect to controlling agency conflicts.

Details

Journal of Derivatives and Quantitative Studies: 선물연구, vol. 30 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1229-988X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 June 2022

Shawna Porter and Trevor Hunter

The authors' work examines whether coercive forces in the general regulatory environment lead to similarity in social media policy across industries and if memetic forces…

Abstract

Purpose

The authors' work examines whether coercive forces in the general regulatory environment lead to similarity in social media policy across industries and if memetic forces of industry-specific values and norms lead to greater similarity of social media policy within industries.

Design/methodology/approach

Corporate social media policies were analyzed using a convergent parallel mixed method design to assess and identify themes and similarities. Using an institutional theory lens, this paper examines whether coercive forces in the general regulatory environment lead to similarities in social media policies across industries, and if mimetic forces from industry-specific norms lead to greater similarity of social media policies within industries. Findings suggest that industry-specific, institutional field-level mimetic forces have a greater effect on social media policy isomorphism than environmental-level coercive forces. This study represents the first assessment of corporate social media policies across organizations and industries.

Findings

Findings suggest that industry-specific, institutional field-level mimetic forces have a greater effect on social media policy isomorphism than environmental-level coercive forces.

Research limitations/implications

Limitations related to sampling were primarily related to policy collection. To deal with these limitations, the sample was planned to allow for the inclusion of both randomly selected North American companies from the Fortune 500 list and another random selection of 35 companies from within a convenience sample of 100 North American firms who had a publicly available social media policy online.

Practical implications

The authors' research speaks to management, directors and researchers who work with policy, governance or risk management as the authors demonstrate the effect regulatory and normative institutions have on social media policies: stakeholders within and without given industries are forcing firms to develop legitimacy-providing social media policies by penalizing those that do not. The authors' findings demonstrate that firms respond to the 21st Century potential corporate risk of unsanctioned social media communications by developing corporate social media policies with similar themes. By identifying the themes common in corporate social media policies, the authors have identified best practices constituting a risk mitigation tool for boards.

Originality/value

The authors' approach is innovative in focus and approach. First, using an institutional theory lens, the authors assess the influence of regulatory and memetic forces on social media policies as a formal structure within an institutional field. Second, the authors' approach includes the first major assessment of North American social media policies across a wide array of organizations and industries, adding to understanding about approaches currently used to manage increased social media use in the workplace.

Details

Journal of Communication Management, vol. 26 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-254X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 December 2019

Liyan Yang, Yuan Jiang, Wei Zhang, Qian Zhang and Hao Gong

The purpose of this paper is to verify and extend the application of the policy acceptance model (PAM) in the field of green behavior. Under the PAM framework, the authors…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to verify and extend the application of the policy acceptance model (PAM) in the field of green behavior. Under the PAM framework, the authors develop and empirically examine on how employee perception of corporate green policy (perceived ease of use and perceived usefulness) increases the acceptance of corporate green policy, which further leads to two types of employee green behavior. The authors also test the moderating roles of moral reflectiveness and performance orientation on these relationships.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors collected complete survey data from 223 work professionals in this study. Multiple regression method was used to test the hypotheses.

Findings

The results showed that there were significant positive impacts of two types of employee perceptions of corporate green policy (perceived ease of use and perceived usefulness) on their attitudes toward corporate green policy. Second, this study reported positive relationships between employees’ attitudes toward corporate green policy and their two types of green behavior. Finally, supplemental analyses supported moderated mediation models, that is, moral reflectiveness and performance orientation, respectively, and moderated indirect effects of employee perceptions on green behaviors through attitude toward corporate green policy.

Research limitations/implications

The data came from a narrow demographic population, which restricts the generalizability of the findings and also raises questions about the specificity of green behaviors manifest in different industries. Besides, this study used cross-sectional, self-reported data, which limits our ability to draw causal conclusions.

Practical implications

Companies can shape employee perceptions regarding the usefulness and ease of corporate green policy to induce and consolidate employees’ task-related and proactive green behaviors.

Social implications

This research will help companies to pay more attention to employees’ reflections and attitudes toward green policies, thus effectively promoting employees’ green behavior in the workplace. These actions will further promote the green development of the economy and society.

Originality/value

The authors extend the PAM framework to the area of green behavior. The PAM is applied to a more micro level of corporate green policy. Further, this paper points out that employees’ instrumental value (performance orientation) and moral trait (moral reflectiveness) moderate the impact of employees’ policy perceptions on their green behaviors.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 41 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 19 June 2020

H. Kent Baker, Narayanage Jayantha Dewasiri, Sandaram P. Premaratne and Weerakoon Yatiwelle Koralalage

This paper aims to investigate the relation between corporate governance and dividend policy in Sri Lankan firms.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate the relation between corporate governance and dividend policy in Sri Lankan firms.

Design/methodology/approach

The data set consists of market data using 1,608 firm-year observations from 201 firms listed on the Colombo Stock Exchange and survey-based data from 151 respondents from the same 201 firms. The authors use data triangulation to examine the two approaches.

Findings

The analysis of the market data reveals that a significantly positive relation between corporate governance on both the propensity to pay dividends and dividend payout. Survey analysis confirms these findings. Triangulated evidence supports the outcome model of dividends, free cash flow and agency cost theories.

Practical implications

The findings are useful not only for management in developing suitable corporate governance practices and dividend policies for their firms but also for shareholders in evaluating both existing and new investments. Future researchers should investigate the same phenomenon in other contexts using triangulation approaches to confirm their findings.

Originality/value

This study is the first to use governance indices both in terms of survey and market-based data to examine the relation between corporate governance and dividend policy.

Details

Qualitative Research in Financial Markets, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-4179

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1984

Archie B. Carroll and Frank Hoy

The 1960s saw the birth of corporate social responsibility. In the 1970s, companies focused on the management of social responsiveness. In the 1980s, corporations are…

1029

Abstract

The 1960s saw the birth of corporate social responsibility. In the 1970s, companies focused on the management of social responsiveness. In the 1980s, corporations are grappling with the issue of making social responsibility a part of overall strategic management. The authors examine some of the ramifications of the search for a new definition of social responsibility.

Details

Journal of Business Strategy, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0275-6668

1 – 10 of over 94000