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Article
Publication date: 5 February 2018

Teresa Müller and Cornelia Niessen

Based on the limited strength model, the purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship of self-leadership strategies (behavior-focused strategies, constructive…

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Abstract

Purpose

Based on the limited strength model, the purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship of self-leadership strategies (behavior-focused strategies, constructive thought patterns) and qualitative and quantitative overload with subsequent self-control strength.

Design/methodology/approach

The present study is a field study with 142 university affiliates and two measurement occasions during a typical workday (before and after lunch). Self-control strength was measured using a handgrip task.

Findings

Hierarchical regression analyses revealed that self-leadership, quantitative overload, and qualitative overload were not directly associated with self-control strength at either of the two measurement occasions. Qualitative overload moderated the relationship between self-leadership and self-control strength, such that self-leadership was associated with lower self-control strength at both measurement occasions when individuals experienced high qualitative overload in the morning.

Practical implications

Employees and employers should be aware of the possibly depleting characteristics of self-leadership in order to be able to create a work environment allowing for the recovery and replenishment of self-control strength.

Originality/value

The present field study theoretically and methodologically contributes to the literature on self-leadership and self-control strength in the work context by investigating the depleting nature of self-leadership and workload.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 33 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 April 2016

Daniela Weseler and Cornelia Niessen

– The purpose of this paper is to investigate the relation between extending and reducing job crafting behavior, cognitive crafting and task performance.

4200

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the relation between extending and reducing job crafting behavior, cognitive crafting and task performance.

Design/methodology/approach

Hierarchical regression analyses of data from 131 employee-supervisor pairs were conducted to analyze the differential relations of five job crafting dimensions to self- and supervisor-rated task performance.

Findings

The present study shows that reduction behavior is rated as counterproductive, and extension behavior is rated as productive in terms of task performance by employees themselves. Supervisors rated task performance higher when employees extended their tasks, and lower when they reduced relationships.

Research limitations/implications

Future research should test the hypotheses in a longitudinal setting and should focus processes that moderate the differential job crafting-task performance relationships.

Originality/value

By distinguishing extending and reducing task and relational boundaries and cognitive crafting, the authors give first evidence to possible negative sides of job crafting.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 31 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 May 2010

Cornelia Niessen, Christine Swarowsky and Markus Leiz

This paper aims to investigate the relationship between age and adaptation to changes in the workplace (perceived demand‐ability fit, task performance before and after…

6305

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate the relationship between age and adaptation to changes in the workplace (perceived demand‐ability fit, task performance before and after change). It also seeks to explore two mediators of the potential age‐adaptation relationships: adaptive self‐efficacy and job experience.

Design/methodology/approach

A sample of 117 employees from three multinational organizations completed two questionnaires one month before and three months after changes in their workplaces.

Findings

Hierarchical linear modelling revealed that age was not related to fit and performance before but was negatively related to fit and performance after organizational change. These relationships were mediated by job experience. Job experience made it more difficult for employees – whether young or old – to adapt to workplace changes. Adaptive self‐efficacy did not mediate the negative age‐adaptation association.

Research limitations/implications

In the sample, only a few employees were older than 56 years which might limit the generalizability of the results. Future research should also attempt to include objective performance data.

Practical implications

Managerial interventions regarding learning, development, and job rotation might counteract negative effects of job tenure.

Originality/value

There is little empirical research addressing issues related to age and adaptation in the workplace. The longitudinal field study presented in the paper contributes to the literature on individual adaptation to changes in the workplace by empirically examining the relationship between age and indicators of adaptation, and its mediating factors.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 25 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 May 2008

Carmen Binnewies, Sandra Ohly and Cornelia Niessen

The purspose of this study is to examine the interplay between job resources (job control and support for creativity from coworkers and supervisors), age and creativity at…

5847

Abstract

Purpose

The purspose of this study is to examine the interplay between job resources (job control and support for creativity from coworkers and supervisors), age and creativity at work. Job control and support for creativity are assumed to benefit idea creativity and to moderate the relationship between age and idea creativity.

Design/methodology/approach

A sample of 117 nurses completed questionnaire measures and reported a creative idea they recently had at work. Three subject matter experts rated the creativity of the ideas. Hierarchical regression analyses were used to test hypotheses.

Findings

Job control and support for creativity as well as age were unrelated to idea creativity. However, job control and support for creativity moderated the relationship between age and idea creativity. Age was positively related to idea creativity under high job control and negatively related to idea creativity under low job control and low support for creativity.

Research limitations/implications

A potentially selective sample due to systematic drop‐outs and a selection effect of older nurses might limit the generalizability of our results. Future research should examine the mechanisms that explain the moderating effect of job resources in the relationship between age and performance.

Practical implications

Older employees' creativity at work can be raised by fostering support for creativity from coworkers and supervisors. Younger employees should get support to deal with a high level of job control, because their creativity is lowest under a high level of job control.

Originality/value

Using data from multiple sources the study shows that different constellations of job resources benefit older and younger employees' creativity at work.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 23 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 January 2017

Sabine Hommelhoff

The purpose of this paper is to take a new look at an old idea: since McGregor’s work in the 1960s, it is common knowledge that managers’ implicit theories about their…

1594

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to take a new look at an old idea: since McGregor’s work in the 1960s, it is common knowledge that managers’ implicit theories about their followers can have self-fulfilling consequences. Surprisingly, McGregor’s work has largely remained within the bounds of employee motivation and has not met with a wide response in related fields such as service management. Assuming that managers do not only hold implicit theories of their followers but also of their customers (i.e. implicit customer theories), this paper transfers McGregor’s Theory X and Theory Y to the service context. It further derives a framework of possible consistencies and inconsistencies between management styles and service strategies, depending on implicit managerial theories about the average employee and customer.

Design/methodology/approach

This conceptual paper integrates a management classic, current empirical findings, and media reports into a new line of thought.

Findings

This paper develops and undergirds the thesis that it is conducive to the development of trustful and productive relationships both with customers and followers if managers proceed from confident assumptions about them, thereby activating virtuous circles instead of vicious cycles.

Originality/value

This paper links concepts from the organizational domain to the service domain. It implies a normative component in arguing for the productive potential of positive and the destructive potential of negative assumptions about both followers and customers. The value of this idea lies in the potential for positive relational dynamics and better customer and workplace relationships.

Details

Journal of Service Theory and Practice, vol. 27 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2055-6225

Keywords

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