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Article
Publication date: 2 September 2014

Deborah Klee, Marc Mordey, Steve Phuare and Cormac Russell

The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate how asset-based community development (ABCD) can be used to build inclusive, connected communities that intentionally value the…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate how asset-based community development (ABCD) can be used to build inclusive, connected communities that intentionally value the contribution of older citizens.

Design/methodology/approach

ABCD was used as an approach to enable older people to transform their neighbourhood and make them a better place to live for all ages. The paper describes this approach and goes on to illustrate how it has been applied in three neighbourhoods using case studies.

Findings

The case studies show that by using ABCD, connections can be made between people, associations/clubs, businesses and services, to achieve the aspirations the citizens have for their neighbourhood. The contribution of older citizens to community life is valued and the risk of isolation and loneliness reduced.

Originality/value

The three case studies presented in this paper are unique in that they have applied ABCD with older people taking on the role of community builders and connectors.

Details

Working with Older People, vol. 18 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-3666

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 16 September 2011

Cormac Russell

This paper seeks to outline the ways in which the desire to age well is inextricably linked to the domains of community and associational life; relies for its strength on…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to outline the ways in which the desire to age well is inextricably linked to the domains of community and associational life; relies for its strength on intimate, soft, human contact in addition to more distant, cold, professional services; can call on an abundance of untapped, local‐based care and, with greater intentionality by policy makers and practitioners, can lead to better physical and mental health outcomes for senior citizens.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is a reflection piece based on the proven qualities of asset‐based community development as a process for convening conversations in communities – from which the latent, caring capacities of individuals and associations are unleashed – allowing communities to build from the inside out. Communities define an ageing well agenda for their locale and implement that agenda according to their capacities.

Findings

The paper finds that citizens and communities co‐producing health outcomes will out‐perform individuals reliant on professional medical services only.

Practical implications

Communities have immense resources for health creation; tapping those resources leverages more health benefits than professional medical interventions alone.

Originality/value

The paper challenges the omnipotent, medicalised, “sickness” model of healthcare and encourages the adoption of a model of healthcare in which citizens, older or otherwise, co‐produce healthy lifestyles and health outcomes in their communities with the assistance of professionals.

Details

Working with Older People, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-3666

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 16 September 2011

Deborah Klee

304

Abstract

Details

Working with Older People, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-3666

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1995

Janet H. Taylor and Joe Ryan

A new form of “museum” has emerged which takes advantage of theInternet′s seemingly limitless format options for electronicpresentation and ability to tailor in‐depth…

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Abstract

A new form of “museum” has emerged which takes advantage of the Internet′s seemingly limitless format options for electronic presentation and ability to tailor in‐depth presentations to niche audiences. Constraints of ownership and geographic location are lessened as Internet‐based museums point to sources across the globe. Collections which are physically impossible to construct are being mounted electronically. Offers a sampler of museums and galleries around the world which are making use of WorldWide Web or Gopher servers.

Details

Internet Research, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 21 June 2013

James Binnie and Sarah Blainey

There is a large and increasing evidence base for cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) for the amelioration of common mental health difficulties. In children and young…

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Abstract

Purpose

There is a large and increasing evidence base for cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) for the amelioration of common mental health difficulties. In children and young people with autism, there is some evidence that CBT can be effective; however, it is unclear whether this also applies to adults with autistic spectrum disorders (ASDs). This review aimed to evaluate the evidence for the use of CBT with adults with ASDs in relation to reducing comorbid psychiatric symptoms and increasing social and communication skills.

Design/methodology/approach

A systematic search was conducted to identify best evidence. Comparison to predetermined inclusion and exclusion criteria identified seven relevant studies; these were subsequently critically appraised.

Findings

The results of the appraisal were mixed with no definitive evidence supporting the review question.

Practical implications

Basing assumptions on best evidence, it is suggested that CBT can help adults with ASDs decrease comorbid psychiatric symptomatology. However, there is little evidence that CBT can increase social and communicative functioning. The review concludes that there is a need for increased quantitative research in this area so that more substantial conclusions can be made.

Originality/value

This paper summarises the available evidence in relation to CBT for adults with ASD; most previous review papers have focused on children and young people. Future research directions are suggested.

Details

Mental Health Review Journal, vol. 18 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-9322

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 July 2020

Mereana Barrett, Krushil Watene and Patty McNicholas

This paper aims to set the scene for an emerging conversation on the Rights of Nature as articulated by a philosophy of law called Earth Jurisprudence, which privileges…

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to set the scene for an emerging conversation on the Rights of Nature as articulated by a philosophy of law called Earth Jurisprudence, which privileges the whole Earth community over the profit-driven structures of the existing legal and economic systems.

Design/methodology/approach

The study used a wide range of thought from literature relating to philosophy, humanities, environmental economics, sustainable development, indigenous rights and legal theory to show how Earth Jurisprudence resonates with two recent treaties of Waitangi settlements in Aotearoa New Zealand that recognise the Rights of Nature.

Findings

Indigenous philosophies have become highly relevant to sustainable and equitable development. They have provided an increasingly prominent approach in advancing social, economic, environmental and cultural development around the world. In Aotearoa New Zealand, Maori philosophies ground the naming of the Te Urewera National Park and the Whanganui River as legal entities with rights.

Practical implications

Recognition of the Rights of Nature in Aotearoa New Zealand necessitates a radical re-thinking by accounting researchers, practitioners and educators towards a more ecocentric view of the environment, given the transformation of environmental law and our responsibilities towards sustainable development.

Originality/value

This relates to the application of Earth Jurisprudence legal theory as an alternative approach towards thinking about integrated reporting and sustainable development.

Details

Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal, vol. 33 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3574

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 January 2018

Hui-Lan H. Titangos

To provide library service to users of all ages has been one of the primary missions of county libraries since 1908 when the first branch of the first county library…

Abstract

Purpose

To provide library service to users of all ages has been one of the primary missions of county libraries since 1908 when the first branch of the first county library system was born in Sacramento as a proud milestone in the history of California public library. It has been a constant challenge to local governments and library staff members alike, especially when there are economic downturns or many priority programs to balance with. The paper aims to discuss this issue.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper introduces an innovative methodology in collection development to promote the concept that library collections, traditional or digital, can serve users of all ages as long as they can be adaptable to meet the changing needs of users, and compatible with changing information technologies.

Findings

By examining the process of an audio collection integrated as part of library collections and deeply rooted in users’ lives, the author reports the findings in the following areas: developing a robust audio collection catering to all users at Santa Cruz Public Libraries, despite technological changes and limited budget; getting involved in the whole organization’s programs and projects by collaborations; offering innovative promotion approaches; providing comprehensive subject coverage and always keeping the local community in mind; and evolving constantly to make technologies your friends, not foes.

Research limitations/implications

The paper analyzes a successful collection development experience in audio collections to strive to realize the original county library’s ideal to serve users of all ages in California.

Practical implications

The successful collection development experience is useful not only for acquisition librarians, but a much broader audience such as library managers in charge of library material budgets.

Social implications

The findings point out a number of social implications confronting library professionals worldwide. They include conflicts between users’ real needs vs our assumptions, limited budget vs expanding coverage, and library services vs the nature of technology.

Originality/value

The paper helps library professionals to develop, maintain, and succeed in their short- and long-term goals in collection development.

Details

Library Management, vol. 39 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 31 May 2022

Ranjan Chaudhuri, Sheshadri Chatterjee, Alkis Thrassou and Demetris Vrontis

The purpose of this study is to determine the antecedents of obesity among the younger generation of Indians (Generation Y) from a psychological and lifestyle consumer…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to determine the antecedents of obesity among the younger generation of Indians (Generation Y) from a psychological and lifestyle consumer perspective. The study also investigates the moderating role of demography on the body mass index (BMI) of Indian youths.

Design/methodology/approach

The study initially develops a conceptual model, stemming from an extensive theoretical research, and subsequently validates this using structural equation modeling (SEM) technique with a sample size of 1,242 Indian youths.

Findings

The study concludes that consumers' food habits (FH) and physical activity (PA) positively impact consumers' physical health (PH), which influences their BMI levels (BLs). Anxiety (AX), depression (DE), stress (ST), peer pressure (PP) and work pressure (WP) impact individuals' mental health (MH), which also influences their BLs. Finally, there is a significant moderating impact of demographic factors, such as age (AG), gender (GE) and income levels (ILs) on the relationship between individuals' physical and MH and individuals' BLs.

Research limitations/implications

This study proposes a new model which highlights the issue of youth consumer obesity from the psychological and lifestyle perspectives. The model is effective as it has a high explanative power of 73%. The study investigates consumer obesity from emerging market like India perspective, but the study does not examine consumer food consumption behavior and obesity from developed market perspective.

Practical implications

Youth obesity could be considered a global pandemic, and obesity rates among the Indian youth are also increasing. This study provides valuable inputs and understanding of consumer markets to policy makers, consumer protection institutions, organizations related to the food and beverage industry, healthcare workers and consumers themselves regarding the antecedents of youth obesity (BL) in developing and emerging markets.

Originality/value

The study adds value to the body of literature related to consumer obesity, FH, consumer psychology and lifestyle through findings that are new in terms of findings' specificity, contextual focus and explication. Moreover, the study extends the cognitive theory of DE and the theory of planned behavior (TPB). The research effectively offers significant theoretical and practicable market knowledge to both scholars and marketing practitioners, as well as policy makers and institutions dealing with youth obesity, particularly in emerging markets.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 3 October 2022

Sami Abdullrahman Alhamidi and Seham Mansour Alyousef

This paper aims to explore the value that care from a primary mental health care nurse (PMHCN) can bring to people with mental health (MH) problems in health-care delivery.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the value that care from a primary mental health care nurse (PMHCN) can bring to people with mental health (MH) problems in health-care delivery.

Design/methodology/approach

This study used a focus group of 20 PMHCNs working in primary care (PC) health settings in Saudi Arabia before using thematic content analysis to describe and explore their views and experiences of the integration of MH care into PC units. The researchers used a semi-structured interview format, which began with open-ended probes and proceeded to use of theoretical sampling based on emerging data related to their experiences and perceptions in the integration process.

Findings

Four main themes were derived from the thematic analysis of interviews: collaboration, knowledge and experience, awareness and orientation care and influential role.

Research limitations/implications

This study’s use of qualitative research methods has certain limitations, including the small sample size of 20 participants, which means that it may not be representative of all primary MH nurses in primary health-care centers in Saudi Arabia. To make the results applicable to a broader audience, the researcher sought to moderate this limitation by including participants with extensive experience in multiple settings and nurses of different ages.

Practical implications

The cost implications of the PMHCN service are not yet comprehensively understood, but it is apparent that this model is not only regarded extremely positively by MH practitioners but may also have significant benefits in terms of patient outcomes. The configuration of local services and relevant patient demographics will affect the extent to which this study’s findings are transferable. Meanwhile, further research in this area could seek to provide further evidence about the aspects of the PMHCN service model, such as secondary care referrals and waiting times, accident and emergency attendances and patient recovery rates and the impact of providing such a service on health-care practitioners as well as its cost-effectiveness.

Originality/value

This study’s findings suggest that PMHCNs believe that their care improves the quality of PC for patients in PC settings. Elements of the PC placement that professionals particularly valued include their ability to assist patients in their own community and the inclusion of volunteer stakeholders who act as preceptors. The participants expressed a need for improvement of policy related to referrals within the clinics.

Details

Mental Health and Social Inclusion, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-8308

Keywords

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