Search results

1 – 3 of 3
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 22 October 2018

Zamzami Zainuddin and Corinne Jacqueline Perera

This paper aims to examine the impact of the learning management system (LMS), in promoting students’ self-directed experiential learning using the flipped classroom…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the impact of the learning management system (LMS), in promoting students’ self-directed experiential learning using the flipped classroom approach. This study further evaluates the effectiveness of integrating video lectures, perceived as a social interface, for students to watch, prior to their class session conducted in class.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a case study that investigated a group of undergraduate students of English as a foreign language (EFL) to identify the impact of the LMS TES BlendSpace in fostering their self-directed learning capacity, using a flipped classroom approach. Data were gathered through a qualitative approach from student interviews and observations of student activities and video-recordings uploaded on TES BlendSpace.

Findings

Flipped classrooms have begun to redesign learning spaces and promote active learning through video-enabled instructional practices. This study provides an overview of flipped classrooms and the benefits students’ gain from the wealth of online content posted on the LMS. The flipped classroom model has clearly shifted the learning paradigm, enabling students the autonomy of their self-directed learning pace and to become acquainted with the currency of video lectures that promote efficacious learning. This study concludes with implications for further research in this area.

Originality/value

This study has the potential to contribute towards the advancement of students’ self-directed learning and proposes its continued application for future EFL classes in this institution, as well as across all courses, to enable self-direction for all students.

Details

On the Horizon, vol. 26 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1074-8121

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 24 June 2020

Zamzami Zainuddin, Corinne Jacqueline Perera, Hussein Haruna and Habiburrahim Habiburrahim

The purpose of this study is twofold. Firstly, this research aims at helping countries implement an equitable, innovative and context-appropriate stay-home game plan for…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is twofold. Firstly, this research aims at helping countries implement an equitable, innovative and context-appropriate stay-home game plan for the millions of disadvantaged and under-privileged students severely affected by the forfeiture of school closures; and secondly, this study proclaims that the burgeoning popularity of gamification has the potential to lay the bedrock foundation for ‘Literacy in the New Norm’.

Design/methodology/approach

The temporal closure of schools around the world to limit the spread of the COVID-19 has resulted in massive educational disruptions triggering adverse effects and bringing much of education under grave threat. Through a review of the current empirical and conceptual literature, this study proposes a new gamification concept in a non-technology environment.

Findings

Well underway are global dialogues that hold conversations on implementing mitigation strategies to counter the looming global health crisis. This has generated the impetus for a more concerted effort by concerned governments and international organizations to identify appropriate solutions for the continuity of learning so that the learning never stops. While educators and learners plunge further into the core of reconstructing education, the authors recognize that the fundamentals of technology and virtual connectivity have all along contributed to the multi-faceted e-learning stage set. However, concerns regarding the paradigm shift to remote online learning would certainly exacerbate inequalities cardinally felt across disadvantaged communities around the globe.

Originality/value

As the world is currently bound by strict isolation measures, learners of all ages have been relegated to the confines of their homes. For the most part, the stark realities of technological mishaps that have befallen underprivileged school children, serve as a reminder to help target children all over the world who are in most peril of losing ground in terms of continued education. It is on these grounds that the criterion set out in this article elucidates the nature and scope of a supplementary stay-home game plan detailing the use of game affordances that bear intelligently in the creation of home-based activities for parents to give it their best effort in fostering a collaborative and meaningful parent-child relationship that spawns the new language of literacy in the new norm.

Details

Information and Learning Sciences, vol. 121 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-5348

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 10 April 2017

Alma Harris, Michelle Jones, Kenny Soon Lee Cheah, Edward Devadason and Donnie Adams

The purpose of this paper is to outline the findings from a small-scale, exploratory, study of principals’ instructional leadership practice in Malaysian primary schools…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to outline the findings from a small-scale, exploratory, study of principals’ instructional leadership practice in Malaysian primary schools. The dimensions and functions of instructional leadership, explicitly explored in this study, are those outlined in the Hallinger and Murphy’s (1985) model.

Design/methodology/approach

This study is part of a larger international, comparative research project that aims to identify the boundaries of the current knowledge base on instructional leadership practice and to develop a preliminary empirically based understanding of how principals conceive and enact their role as instructional leaders in Hong Kong, China, Vietnam, Malaysia, Singapore, Taiwan, and Thailand. Using a qualitative research design, semi-structured interviews were conducted with 30 primary school principals in Malaysia. The sample comprised principals from 14 Government National schools (SK), nine principals from Chinese schools (SJKC) and seven principals from Tamil schools (SJKT). The qualitative data were initially analysed inductively, and subsequently coded using ATLAS.ti to generate the findings and conclusions.

Findings

The findings showed that the Malaysian principals, who were interviewed, understood and could describe their responsibilities relating to improving instructional practice. In particular, they talked about the supervision of teachers and outlined various ways in which they actively monitored the quality of teaching and learning in their schools. These data revealed that some of the duties and activities associated with being a principal in Malaysia are particularly congruent with instructional leadership practices. In particular, the supervision of teaching and learning along with leading professional learning were strongly represented in the data.

Research limitations/implications

This is a small-scale, exploratory study involving 30 principals.

Practical implications

There is a clear policy aspiration, outlined in the Malaysian Education Blueprint, that principals should be instructional leaders. The evidence shows that principals are enacting some of the functions associated with being an instructional leader but not others.

Originality/value

The findings from this study provide some new insights into the principals’ instructional leadership practices in Malaysia. They also provide a basis for further, in-depth exploration that can enhance the knowledge base about principals’ instructional leadership practices in Malaysia.

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 55 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

Keywords

1 – 3 of 3