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Article
Publication date: 6 May 2021

Luu Trong Tuan

Hospitality is one of the industries severely impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic. It is vital to comprehend how to help the workforce in this service sector grow resilient…

1360

Abstract

Purpose

Hospitality is one of the industries severely impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic. It is vital to comprehend how to help the workforce in this service sector grow resilient through such a crisis. This paper aims to unpack the role of employer event communication in promoting hotel workers’ resilience.

Design/methodology/approach

The data were garnered from 462 hotel workers who were on unpaid leave or layoff during the hotel shutdown.

Findings

The results unfolded the positive link between employer event communication and hotel workers’ resilience, for which core beliefs examination served as a mediation mechanism. Family support was found to moderate the effect of employer event communication on core beliefs examination.

Practical implications

The findings indicate to hospitality organizations that in face of a crisis such as the COVID-19, their employee resilience can be activated if they implement event communication activities. They should further realize that their support should go hand in hand with family support in fueling employee resilience from the crisis.

Originality/value

This study advances the understanding of how and when to promote resilience among hotel workers during a pandemic crisis.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 33 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 22 June 2012

Philip Hyland and Daniel Boduszek

The field of cognitive-behavioural therapy contains many different theoretical models of psychopathology, with each discipline ascribing greater emphasis to a particular…

2844

Abstract

Purpose

The field of cognitive-behavioural therapy contains many different theoretical models of psychopathology, with each discipline ascribing greater emphasis to a particular cognitive process or organisation of beliefs. This paper seeks to propose a method of integrating the two most widely practiced and researched schools of CBT; Beck ' s cognitive therapy (CT) and Ellis ' s rational emotive behaviour therapy (REBT).

Design/methodology/approach

Although there exist a large degree of similarity between the two therapeutic approaches, the two models do differ in relation to their respective hypothesises regarding the core psychological variable in psychopathology. Cognitive theory hypothesises that negative representational beliefs are of central importance whereas rational emotive behaviour theory hypothesises that negative evaluative demands lie at the core of psychological disturbance. This paper evaluates these competing predictions on the basis of the available empirical literature.

Results

The empirical literature provides greater support for the organisation and interrelations of the irrational beliefs proposed by REBT theory over CT theory, however the research data clearly indicate the importance of the cognitive variables stressed by CT theory in the pathogenesis of psychological distress. Based on the available evidence an integrated CBT model which incorporates elements of both CT and REBT theory is presented. It is proposed that this integrated model can serve as the stepping-stone toward a larger, single, coherent CBT model of psychopathology.

Research limitations/implications

Few empirical studies have directly compared the competing predictions of CT and REBT theory. If future research supports the findings presented in this paper, the proposed model can serve as a template for the development of a unified, general-CBT theory of psychopathology.

Practical implications

The integrated model presented in this paper can serve as a guiding theoretical model for therapeutic practice which takes into account therapeutic methods from both CT and REBT.

Originality/value

This paper proposes the first theoretical model which incorporates the competing theoretical conceptualizations of psychological distress from the two main schools of CBT.

Article
Publication date: 17 August 2012

Henning Bang

The purpose of this paper is to explore why executives participating in a top management team meeting avoid speaking up when they experience the goal as unclear or the…

1440

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore why executives participating in a top management team meeting avoid speaking up when they experience the goal as unclear or the discussion as wandering off track.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 21 executives (CEOs and level 2 managers) from seven top management teams were interviewed, and the interviews analyzed according to the principles of Grounded Theory.

Findings

The executives’ silence was primarily governed by a core belief that to speak up about miscommunication is a negative act, which will probably elicit undesirable consequences. This assumption was reinforced by how the executives perceived themselves, other persons and relationships in the group, group norms, and the issue discussed in the meeting. In addition, three other basic beliefs prevented the level 2 managers from speaking up: “We have no tradition for speaking up in this group”, “It's futile to speak up”, and “It's not part of my role to speak up in this group”.

Research limitations/implications

The data were collected from executives representing only seven top management teams from the public sector in Norway, limiting the generalizability of the findings. Future research should increase the number and types of top management teams from which informants are drawn.

Practical implications

Executives should be aware of how their beliefs and perceptions prevent them from voicing their concerns when experiencing miscommunication during the TMT meeting, and how remaining silent in these matters represents an important barrier to team effectiveness in the meetings.

Originality/value

The study shows that even among executives at the top of the organizational hierarchy, people refrain from speaking up when experiencing miscommunication, and that there are more reasons for not voicing concerns than fear of consequences and feelings of futility.

Details

Qualitative Research in Organizations and Management: An International Journal, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5648

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 18 May 2011

Liz Bird

This paper aims to explore recent approaches to reducing reoffending and to describe a new intervention, The Belief in Change Programme, which proposes an holistic…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore recent approaches to reducing reoffending and to describe a new intervention, The Belief in Change Programme, which proposes an holistic approach to working with offenders.

Design/methodology/approach

Some background on the recent UK government policies and research on reducing offending is given. The Belief in Change Programme is explored in this context.

Findings

The Belief in Change Programme highlights the importance of changing the offender's view of life, cognitive skills, access to resources and the perspective of communities to which they return. It encourages offenders to take responsibility to create a vision for the future and be leaders in their own journey of change; but, it also calls on communities to inspire, support and participate in this process.

Originality/value

Leadership is an important dimension of The Belief in Change Programme as some of the methods mirror those used in organisational development. Offenders can also be important leaders of each other by inspiring through role modeling, directing, coaching and mentoring those in earlier stages of the change journey. To ensure the reintegration and successful change of offenders, the wider community would benefit from inspirational leadership to create a revised vision for the rehabilitation and the vital part in which we all play.

Details

International Journal of Leadership in Public Services, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-9886

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 November 2015

Barbara Andraka-Christou

The Orphan Drug Act has provided the pharmaceutical industry with incentives to research and develop drugs for orphan diseases: rare diseases with little profit potential…

Abstract

Purpose

The Orphan Drug Act has provided the pharmaceutical industry with incentives to research and develop drugs for orphan diseases: rare diseases with little profit potential. It is considered very successful legislation by legal scholars, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), and orphan drug activists. The policy process of the Act provides an important model of the policy process for future incentive-based pharmaceutical legislation. The purpose of this paper is to summarize the important incentives of the Act and the historical events leading up to the Act. The paper applies three different theoretical models of the public policy process to understand the emergence of the Orphan Drug Act: Kingdon’s Multiple Streams Model, the Advocacy Coalition Framework, and Social Constructionism Theory. The paper then synthesizes the public policy process lessons from each perspective and provides four recommendations for other social activists seeking to propel incentive-based pharmaceutical legislation for under-researched diseases.

Design/methodology/approach

The author analyzes the history of the Orphan Drug Act based on publicly available scholarly research, government documents, and interest group publications. The author then applies three public policy theories to the history of the Orphan Drug Act to explain the emergence of the Act and to extract policy process lessons for future disease activists.

Findings

Regardless of which theoretical perspective the Orphan Drug Act is analyzed from, some common themes of the policy process emerge. First, focussing events are instrumental in capturing the public’s sympathy and Congress’s attention. Second, in its activities and proposed legislation, a coalition should provide a role for all relevant and important actors. Third, the target groups of the legislation were construed positively, increasing the pressure for Congressmen to pass some kind of bill. Finally, the proper construction of “the problem” is instrumental to passing effective legislation as a “solution.”

Originality/value

The Orphan Drug Act is widely considered successful incentive-based pharmaceutical legislation. However, because it was originally passed in 1983 and has not had public attention since the early 1990s (when it was amended), it has rarely been written about in recent years. However, its lessons are still highly relevant to policy activists, especially disease activists. Furthermore, existing articles focus on the impact of the legislation and ways to amend it, rather than on the passage of the Act.

Details

Journal of Entrepreneurship and Public Policy, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2045-2101

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1995

Joel D. Nicholson and Lee P. Stepina

Examines work beliefs across three nations (The People's Republic of China (PRC), the USA and Venezuela) using Buchholz's work belief scales. Finds strong support for the…

Abstract

Examines work beliefs across three nations (The People's Republic of China (PRC), the USA and Venezuela) using Buchholz's work belief scales. Finds strong support for the proposition that work belief systems vary across cultures. Specifically, the work ethic was found to be strongest in the PRC and weaker in the USA and Venezuela. Venezuelans were the strongest in organizational belief system scores. Indicates fundamental differences in motivation to work in the three countries. Discusses specific results and provides conclusions.

Details

Cross Cultural Management: An International Journal, vol. 2 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7606

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1993

Craig C. Lundberg and Judi Brownell

This manuscript explores the contributions of organizational learning to organizational communication. The study of organizational communication is seen in…

Abstract

This manuscript explores the contributions of organizational learning to organizational communication. The study of organizational communication is seen in multi‐dimensional terms as the study of how meanings are created, stored, distributed, and modified in the service of organizational performance and change. An overview of organizational communication is provided and organizational learning and its main assumptions are explained. The authors then demonstrate how the incorporation of organizational learning concepts into organizational communication theory permit the integration and extension of much of what is known about how organizational members communicate, learn, and change. An integrative model is presented which explains how individual and organizational understandings are interrelated.

Details

The International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1055-3185

Article
Publication date: 8 January 2019

Scott Harris Waltman and Angelique Palermo

The term catastrophizing was coined by Ellis (1962) and commented on by Beck (1979). Since that time, much research has been done on the topic and a recent review article…

Abstract

Purpose

The term catastrophizing was coined by Ellis (1962) and commented on by Beck (1979). Since that time, much research has been done on the topic and a recent review article postulated that catastrophizing served as a transdiagnostic mechanism across the psychiatric disorders (Gellatly and Beck, 2016). In rational emotive behavior therapy (REBT), there is a greater emphasis placed on the underlying irrational beliefs than the surface-level automatic thoughts; therefore, REBT therapists tend to focus on Awfulizing as opposed to catastrophizing. While these terms sound similar, it is unclear what theoretical overlap and distinction exists between the concepts. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is a review and synthesis of the extant literature, drawing from both theorists and empirical studies, to map out the similar and unique aspects of each cognition.

Findings

Awfulizing and catastrophizing are distinct concepts with differing effects on cognitive, affective and behavioral responses; these findings extend beyond theoretical models and are supported by empirical literature.

Originality/value

This review has direct implications for practitioners of the cognitive and behavioral therapies, including REBT, and those seeking an integration of the cognitive therapies.

Details

Mental Health Review Journal, vol. 24 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-9322

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 April 2009

Jon Cloke

This paper seeks to use the way in which markets in derivatives have developed historically to examine how neo‐classical market‐oriented economic theory has been used as a…

1626

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to use the way in which markets in derivatives have developed historically to examine how neo‐classical market‐oriented economic theory has been used as a stalking‐horse to create an illusionary market in the increasingly complex derivatives that have brought about the current global financial crisis and which threaten liberal democracy.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper analyses the current global financial crisis using three separate themes in the development of derivatives themselves: the development of financial derivatives themselves; the subversion of risk analysis; and the co‐opting of the concept and analysis of fair value by the financial services industry and its support network. These themes are used to show how self‐regulation, supervision and the perception of risk have effectively been abandoned in the creation of an immensely profitable market based on an imaginary product. The study uses a combination of available facts and figures from professional literature and from international financial institutions and financial services organisations, as well as comparative analyses outlining financial services praxis.

Findings

It is suggested that in an effectively unregulated, globalising capitalism this crisis and others like it are inevitable, and that the self‐regulating capacities of capitalism suggested by neo‐classical theory are non‐existent.

Originality/value

The paper uses facts and figures provided by the financial services industry to illustrate the poverty of the theoretical justification of the market in financial derivatives and the critiques of various practitioners and experts to point out that the crisis came foretold.

Details

Critical perspectives on international business, vol. 5 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1742-2043

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 May 2018

Mark Peterson and Elizabeth A. Minton

Marketing students need better grounding in understanding major worldviews of the twenty-first century, given nearly guaranteed, international interactions with…

Abstract

Purpose

Marketing students need better grounding in understanding major worldviews of the twenty-first century, given nearly guaranteed, international interactions with stakeholders. As such, the purpose of this paper is to develop a pedagogy focused upon secular and religious worldviews that can be used effectively in the classroom.

Design/methodology/approach

A cross-cultural study using data from the USA and China examines current worldview understanding among business school students. A training session in worldviews is then conducted, and a follow-up study is used to assess worldview learning and further interest in learning more about worldviews.

Findings

Student understanding of worldviews is increased through a 1.5-h teaching session. Students’ interest in learning more about worldviews significantly increased after the teaching session.

Practical implications

Worldview training is an effective way to prepare students for interacting with stakeholders in the increasingly global world in which these students will eventually work. Business schools need to incorporate worldview training in international marketing courses, at a minimum, or offer complete courses in worldviews and related applications to business operations.

Originality/value

Prior research has not tested worldview training on business students, especially when comparing student learning in a more religious-based culture (USA) and a more secular-based culture (China). Thus, this research shows that worldview training is effective regardless of the culture it is used in, which is important to informing students in a growing global marketplace.

Details

Journal of International Education in Business, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-469X

Keywords

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