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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1982

Coral R. Bayley‐Jones

The author explains research work about urban areas as tourist sources in the framework of research approach to urban recreation. Pressing need for indepth urban…

Abstract

The author explains research work about urban areas as tourist sources in the framework of research approach to urban recreation. Pressing need for indepth urban recreation research exists in consideration of the dynamic “process” of tourism.

Details

The Tourist Review, vol. 37 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0251-3102

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1982

Coral R. Bayley‐Jones

Campbell postulates that: first, the city as source area should be the focus of study in urban recreation research rather than the destination, which is more often…

Abstract

Campbell postulates that: first, the city as source area should be the focus of study in urban recreation research rather than the destination, which is more often selected by researchers; and that, second, concern should also focus on the spatial interaction of the city with the recreational area (Campbell, 1966, 87). He proposes a model to represent these concerns and in this he suggests that the type of movement pursued is related to the recreational experience desired and that the spatial distribution of the tourist industry is similarly associated.

Details

The Tourist Review, vol. 37 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0251-3102

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Book part
Publication date: 18 November 2020

Valeria Vegh Weis and Rob White

This chapter examines the theoretical contributions of Marx and Engels as a framework for analysing the historical evolution of the idea of inequality within the domestic…

Abstract

This chapter examines the theoretical contributions of Marx and Engels as a framework for analysing the historical evolution of the idea of inequality within the domestic and international legal frameworks in capitalist societies. It discusses what can be referred to as a triple inequality in the legal frameworks that emerged at the end of the eighteenth century in a historical context dominated by bourgeois revolutions. The new ruling class relied on a legal-philosophical discourse to promote a drastic legal transformation: the equal treatment for all citizens under the law. This marked the beginning of a period of ‘idyllic justice’ grounded in consensual social values that gave the appearance, at least formally, of non-selectivity. Despite these promises, the emergent formal treatment under the law contrasted with the inequality of the law in practice. The continuity of the vulnerable sectors' dispossession – an inherent element of the development of capitalism – was then masked behind three modes of inequality: the denial of unequal material conditions through the imposition of an ahistorical and abstract characterisation of the law; inequality of the formal law; and inequality in the application of the law. Today, in an age of global governance, this chapter proposes that a similar process of global triple inequality is taking place through the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. Reflections on possible paths to overcome this trend can be found at the end of the chapter.

Details

The Emerald Handbook of Crime, Justice and Sustainable Development
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-355-5

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1958

ELSEWHERE in this number we list libraries which have Esent us copies of their annual reports which we are glad to have. Now and again we are able to elaborate on these…

Abstract

ELSEWHERE in this number we list libraries which have Esent us copies of their annual reports which we are glad to have. Now and again we are able to elaborate on these, but in the present issue that has not been possible. We would say, however, that these reports are deserving of the attention of librarians generally, and of students at the library schools. They are records of work in progress, and they do suggest the development of library policy. The best of them are of textbook value.

Details

Library Review, vol. 16 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1929

THE PRESIDENT of the Library Association for 1929–30 will be Lord Balneil, the son of the Earl of Crawford, and it is difficult to think of a better choice. Lord Balneil…

Abstract

THE PRESIDENT of the Library Association for 1929–30 will be Lord Balneil, the son of the Earl of Crawford, and it is difficult to think of a better choice. Lord Balneil has an admirable bibliographical ancestry—if we may so put it—seeing that his grandfather, the 26th Earl of Crawford, was President in 1898; and the Haigh Hall Library at the family seat is one of the noble private libraries of England. Lord Balneil is the Chairman of the Appeal Committee for the endowment of the School of Librarianship and so has already identified himself in a practical manner with the cause of libraries.

Details

New Library World, vol. 31 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1906

IN dealing with the subject of school libraries at a meeting of educationalists, it will be quite unnecessary to advance any arguments in praise of reading. I do not…

Abstract

IN dealing with the subject of school libraries at a meeting of educationalists, it will be quite unnecessary to advance any arguments in praise of reading. I do not anticipate that any here will attempt to controvert the dicta of the greatest minds on the benefits to be derived from reading. Rather would I sound a note of warning. After all that has been said in praise of books and reading, of the pleasures and profit reading can bring, there is nothing with which you have to deal in the present day that calls for more careful regulation, more vigilant watchfulness. Printing, like all other good things, is not an unmixed blessing; for while bestowing blessings with one hand, it distributes something very like curses with the other. Just think for one moment of the enormous mass of garbage that is daily turned out by the Press—the halfpenny “funnies” and “comics,” and the still more objectionable “stories.” These are the things which fall into the hands of children at the most impressionable period of their lives, and exercise the most lamentable influence on their future character. That is the darker side of the picture, but it is there that the influence and guidance of the teacher is more urgently required. The great argument in favour of school or juvenile libraries is that children shall have access to good books; that by the help of the teacher they shall learn to so enjoy and appreciate the good that they will instinctively reject the bad. It is very desirable if you wish to take full advantage of your opportunities that you should acquire some general knowledge of juvenile literature. I do not mean that you should lay yourselves out to read all the books; life is much too short; but there is a method of skipping through a book which is well known to librarians and, I believe, also to reviewers, by which it is possible to quickly gain an insight of its contents, the author's style and manner of treatment, which will be quite sufficient for your purpose. Beware, I beseech you, of the goody‐goody style of books of a generation ago; present day children won't read them (I very much doubt if children ever did, I didn't). You will probably be impressed with the dearth of good, healthy girls' books; but that need not trouble you, they will read and enjoy the books provided for their brothers.

Details

New Library World, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1968

A FACTOR which all industrialised countries must take into account is the general increase in the age of the world population. There are many reasons for this increase but…

Abstract

A FACTOR which all industrialised countries must take into account is the general increase in the age of the world population. There are many reasons for this increase but one or two are self‐evident. There has been a spectacular drop in infant mortality. The fight against disease is progressively successful. Better living standards make for a sense of well‐being in the population.

Details

Work Study, vol. 17 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0043-8022

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1972

SINCE the world is so replete with institutes of various kinds it is unlikely to welcome another without a close scrutiny of its intentions, even when launched with all…

Abstract

SINCE the world is so replete with institutes of various kinds it is unlikely to welcome another without a close scrutiny of its intentions, even when launched with all the eclat of a House of Commons dinner attended by distinguished figures from the industrial and organizational fields.

Details

Work Study, vol. 21 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0043-8022

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Article
Publication date: 14 March 2016

S. Marlon Gayadeen and Scott W. Phillips

– The purpose of this research is to examine ritualistic humor or joking that exists in a small, rural police department in Western New York.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research is to examine ritualistic humor or joking that exists in a small, rural police department in Western New York.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected through participatory observations and interviews during the summer of 2014. Both authors worked in tandem to capitalize on individual expertise to maximize data collection and analyses.

Findings

Results suggest that humor is leveraged by officers to socialize, cope and demarcate authority. Depending on the circumstance, humor can be orchestrated or spontaneous, given the intentions of the officer.

Originality/value

Humor is an important lens through which to view police behavior. The current research underscores the importance of levity as a gauge of organizational and individual health.

Details

Journal of Organizational Ethnography, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-6749

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1999

K.H. Spencer Pickett

Using the backdrop of an (apparently) extended visit to the West Indies, analogies with key concerns of internal audit are drawn. An unusual and refreshing way of…

Abstract

Using the backdrop of an (apparently) extended visit to the West Indies, analogies with key concerns of internal audit are drawn. An unusual and refreshing way of exploring the main themes ‐ a discussion between Bill and Jack on tour in the islands ‐ forms the debate. Explores the concepts of control, necessary procedures, fraud and corruption, supporting systems, creativity and chaos, and building a corporate control facility.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 37 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

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