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Article
Publication date: 5 July 2021

Pimporn Phukrongpet, Hanvedes Daovisan and Panarat Satsanasupint

The purpose of this study is to explore the drivers of innovative behaviour of sustainable community-based enterprises (SCBEs) in the Mahasarakham province, Thailand.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to explore the drivers of innovative behaviour of sustainable community-based enterprises (SCBEs) in the Mahasarakham province, Thailand.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing on insights from a qualitative case study method, this paper uses a purposive sampling technique with 30 SCBEs from December 2019 to December 2020. This study uses in-depth interviews and applied content analysis (e.g. theme, categorisation, quotation and coding), using the ATLAS.ti software.

Findings

This case study shows that transforming the community into an enterprise is related to creation, venture and innovative management, sustained in community-based enterprises. The findings reveal that innovative behaviour is associated with intention, thinking, orientation, product development, service, collaboration, competition and technology, which drives SCBEs.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the understanding of community-based group and cooperative community-based enterprise with innovative behaviour, which can drive SCBEs growth.

Details

International Journal of Innovation Science, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-2223

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 24 March 2021

Marc Schneiberg

Despite recent advances, neither organizational studies nor the scholarship on economic resilience has systematically addressed how the ecologies of organizations that…

Abstract

Despite recent advances, neither organizational studies nor the scholarship on economic resilience has systematically addressed how the ecologies of organizations that populate local economies can serve as infrastructures for responding proactively to economic shocks. Using county-level data, this study analyzes relationships between the prevalence of organizational alternatives to shareholder value-oriented (SVO) corporations within a particular locality and its unemployment levels during and after the Great Recession. The results support the hypothesis that the presence of such alternative organizations can enhance the capacities of local economies to resist and recover from recession shocks. Cooperative, municipal, and community-based enterprises, research universities, and nonprofits more generally were associated with greater resistance to the recession shock and stronger recoveries – specifically, lower surges in unemployment rates from 2007 to 2010 and greater reductions in unemployment rates from 2010 to 2016. By contrast, SVO corporations were associated with greater surges in unemployment and perhaps weaker recoveries. Providing a proof of concept, this study opens up new lines of inquiry for organizational studies by linking organizational ecologies to the promotion of collective efficacy and a more broadly shared prosperity in economic life.

Details

Organizational Imaginaries: Tempering Capitalism and Tending to Communities through Cooperatives and Collectivist Democracy
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-989-7

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Book part
Publication date: 31 July 2014

Crystal Tremblay and Ana Maria Peredo

The purpose of this chapter is to document the use of Participatory Action Research methods as an effective approach for community empowerment and strategies for more…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this chapter is to document the use of Participatory Action Research methods as an effective approach for community empowerment and strategies for more inclusive public policy.

Design/methodology

The methodology draws on a “participatory video” project with recycling cooperatives in São Paulo, Brazil, and documents the process, benefits, and challenges of using action-oriented methods and tools as an approach to build capacity for political and social change. The authors provide a step-by-step process of facilitating a PV project, its application for policy engagement, and some of the major dilemmas in using PV, including representation, power, and vulnerability.

Findings

The research findings conclude that the application of Participatory Action Research as a research method in social entrepreneurship, contributes significantly to build transformative capacity in participating members, in addition to creating new spaces for inclusive policy.

Originality/value

The research is unique in that it points to creative and transformative methods of engagement for inclusive governance, embracing multiple forms of personal identity, knowledge and creative expression in moving toward new solutions for equal opportunities and possibilities for change. Participatory video is argued to be an innovative avenue for the inclusion of multiple voices in these arenas, voices of people otherwise left on the margins. Participatory video is an approach that has the potential to transform the way we (local and global) move toward greater social equity, human compassion, and environmental flourishing.

Details

Social Entrepreneurship and Research Methods
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-141-1

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 22 June 2012

Surjit Kumar Kar

Sambalpuri Bastralaya Handloom Co‐operative Society Limited (SBHCSL), or “Bastralaya”, is a rural community‐based cooperative enterprise in the Western province of state…

Abstract

Purpose

Sambalpuri Bastralaya Handloom Co‐operative Society Limited (SBHCSL), or “Bastralaya”, is a rural community‐based cooperative enterprise in the Western province of state Odisha in India. Weaver‐members are self‐employed in a home‐based weaving system and use their tacit traditional knowledge and expertise. Undertaking a case study of this enterprise, the purpose of this paper is to explain traditional knowledge management process of the community.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 40 respondents from among enterprise employees, members of weaving and sales branches, members of government/ non‐government agencies were interviewed/ observed. A qualitative research method called “narrative enquiry” was used to restory and interpret respondents' data and stories gathered from the field study. Analysis of documents was also a method used.

Findings

For management of knowledge processes, Bastralaya focuses on creating members' skills and knowledge, i.e. creation of contextual skills and knowledge, in addition to existing generic tacit knowledge; building members' competence and capturing new knowledge; crystallizing new knowledge for customer‐focused design and organizational learning; and finally, knowledge preservation and internalization. Community weavers inherit traditional weaving knowledge across generations and learn informally through interaction, observation, socialization, co‐operation and apprenticeships in the natural settings of the co‐operative enterprise system.

Originality/value

In the light of knowledge management models, this paper explains the process of knowledge preservation and dissemination in rural weaving community enterprises and can also be used to understand rural micro enterprises.

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Book part
Publication date: 30 September 2021

Mike O'Donnell

Abstract

Details

Crises and Popular Dissent
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-362-5

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Article
Publication date: 23 March 2012

Robert Smith

Socio‐economic decline in rural areas is a pervasive and debilitating phenomenon in terms of regional development, particularly when former models of economic growth which…

Abstract

Purpose

Socio‐economic decline in rural areas is a pervasive and debilitating phenomenon in terms of regional development, particularly when former models of economic growth which once stimulated business generation and regeneration can no longer be counted on to do so. In these austere times, models of social and community enterprise are becoming more important. This corresponds to the emergence of theories of community‐based entrepreneurship and social enterprise as explanatory variables. Such theories are used to label enterprising behaviour enacted within our communities, even when the theoretical arguments underpinning these re‐conceptualisations require to be stretched to permit this. Often the resultant explanations are not entirely convincing. The purpose of this paper is to challenge existing conceptualisations of community‐based entrepreneurship and social enterprise.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a case study methodology, the paper reports on the activities of the Buchan Development Partnership (BDP) – a community‐based project situated in the Buchan area of Aberdeenshire, Scotland – demonstrating how individual and community enterprise can be utilized to develop enterprising individuals and communities by growing enterprises organically. The case articulates this process, as it occurred in a rural development partnership using a narrative‐based case study methodology to examine activities and growth strategies.

Findings

The case bridges issues of entrepreneurship, entrepreneurial process, community and regional development and tells a story of community regeneration through the process of “Community Animateurship”.

Research limitations/implications

Research, practical and social implications are discussed but in particular the need to adopt a more holistic “bottom up” approach.

Originality/value

This case challenges existing conceptualisations of community‐based entrepreneurship and social enterprise.

Details

Journal of Enterprising Communities: People and Places in the Global Economy, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6204

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Article
Publication date: 23 August 2013

Nor Haniza Mohamad and Amran Hamzah

The purpose of this paper is to share how a tourism cooperative creates economic sustainability as well as bringing socio‐cultural and environmental benefits to its members.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to share how a tourism cooperative creates economic sustainability as well as bringing socio‐cultural and environmental benefits to its members.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors' case study was the Miso Walai Homestay in Batu Puteh on the Kinabatangan River of Sabah, Malaysia. In‐depth interviews were conducted with cooperative managers and cooperative members who were identified through the purposive sampling method. Direct observation was used to gain an understanding of ground reality.

Findings

A community cooperative effectively manages economic, socio‐cultural, and environmental concerns of the local people. Society's perception of entrepreneurship and main‐streaming has changed. Shareholdership enables higher community involvement in the decision‐making processes, increases tourism income distribution, solidifies the sense of ownership, strengthens social cohesion and, inevitably, increases community support.

Practical implications

The lessons learned from the experience of the Model of Economically Sustainable Community Tourism (MESCOT) in using a community cooperative to run its community‐based tourism (CBT), which eventually expanded its economic benefits, are relevant to researchers and practitioners, and can guide other local CBT organizations in Malaysia.

Originality/value

Although the case study referred to a specific community in Malaysia, the findings do prove that an effective model for community‐based tourism is possible and has potential for replication in other places with similar enabling environments.

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2010

Alejandra Orozco‐Quintero and Fikret Berkes

The purpose of this paper is to identify and describe the pervasiveness and importance of various types of institutional and organizational interactions across multiple…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify and describe the pervasiveness and importance of various types of institutional and organizational interactions across multiple levels for the management of a community forest enterprise.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper analyzes a long‐standing case in Michoacán, Mexico, the San Juan Nuevo (SJN) enterprise, a community‐based system with a multiplicity of actors, objectives, and partners. Information was collected through 100 semi‐structured interviews. By presenting and discussing the main community‐based development strategy within the overall socio‐political context and achievements of the case, the authors attempt to understand the complexity of cross‐scale institutional and organizational linkages and their role in sustainable resource management.

Findings

SJN enterprise had linkages with some 22 major partners over the years across four levels of organization: local, state, federal, and international. Cross‐scale partnerships were not merely important, but essential for the overall success of the enterprise in the face of uncertainty over resource ownership and lack of legal jurisdiction. These diverse partnerships and interactions enabled robust institutional structures, making possible the development of linkages to help conserve the resource base and create grassroots socio‐economic development for the comuneros.

Research limitations/implications

Further understanding of the importance of partnerships and linkages for the development and maintenance of community‐based initiatives will require the analysis of, and comparison between, several long‐standing case studies.

Practical implications

There is the need to recognize the multiple roles of partnerships, from business networking to research and training, thus unpacking different kinds of capacity building. Actors at various levels can influence management practices in diverse ways, helping to find a balance between local livelihoods and larger conservation needs.

Originality/value

The paper brings a new approach to analyze how indigenous and other rural communities are “opting‐in” to the global economy, through a diversity of partnerships and a complexity of interactions across organizational levels.

Details

Journal of Enterprising Communities: People and Places in the Global Economy, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6204

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 21 August 2017

Laura L. Cochrane

Senegal’s history since the nineteenth century has favored collective ownership and work, whether state-run cooperatives or community-based organizations (CBOs). This…

Abstract

Senegal’s history since the nineteenth century has favored collective ownership and work, whether state-run cooperatives or community-based organizations (CBOs). This chapter first examines the history of resistance to cooperatives imposed by the French colonial administration and Senegal’s independent state until 1980. The primary separate community organizations were, and are, within daaras: communities based on Islamic spiritual principles. The chapter then explores today’s CBOs, many of which are faith-based, that resist neoliberal approaches to development, again, through community-based principles. CBOs have grown within the space that state control once occupied, and have as much do with indigenous structures and faith-based principles as they do with globally recognized models of development. These foundational philosophies shape the ways people organize themselves, choose their shared goals, and elect their leaders. To discuss contemporary trends in community organization, the chapter uses ethnographic examples from two present-day communities, one a faith-based daara and the other a five-village CBO. This history and contemporary examples show that locally grown organizations resist easy definitions of colonial, state, or neoliberal development, and take control over the ways they organize their communities.

Details

Oppression and Resistance
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-167-6

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Article
Publication date: 6 August 2020

Cicilia Larasati Rembulan, Avin Fadilla Helmi and Bagus Riyono

The concept of power in the literature is not conclusive yet and still contradictive. As contested concept, power have multi-definition in the literature. This study aims…

Abstract

Purpose

The concept of power in the literature is not conclusive yet and still contradictive. As contested concept, power have multi-definition in the literature. This study aims to construct a concept of power between organizations, state-owned enterprises (SOE) and communities in the context of community-based tourism in Borobudur, Indonesia.

Design/methodology/approach

Participants were 29 individuals representing SOEs (i.e. executive members) and local communities (e.g. village chiefs, community enterprise, managers and residents). Data collection was conducted through interviews, focus group discussions, field records and documents. Using grounded theory, the data were analyzed using open, axial and selective coding.

Findings

This study discovered that power was fluid. At first, power was a static resource then when it exchanged, it turned into relational/power interplay and at last, became output resource. There was a transformation of antecedent resources of power into a consequential source of power through relationship processes.

Research limitations/implications

This study should be replicated in other settings for further research, for example, in a business-to-business context and business-to-government to develop a general framework.

Practical implications

Policymakers should be aware of such fluid power to ensure that community-based tourism programs can benefit all parties involved.

Originality/value

Findings from this study make several contributions to current literature as follows: this study extends from the existing theories of power, the community-based tourism context where this study was conducted represents actual social situation allowing it to be transferrable to real environment and elaborating theory of power into a comprehensive framework.

Details

Journal of Enterprising Communities: People and Places in the Global Economy, vol. 14 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6204

Keywords

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