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Publication date: 30 November 2020

Bruce Prideaux and Michelle Thompson

Remote communities often face a range of problems related to distance, service provision, high costs, and economic uncertainty. Many of these problems are structural and a…

Abstract

Remote communities often face a range of problems related to distance, service provision, high costs, and economic uncertainty. Many of these problems are structural and a direct result of their location on a periphery. In recent decades many remote settlements have looked to the tourism sector to supplement existing local economies. Numerous tools variously described in the literature as theories, models, and frameworks have been suggested as approaches for assisting local economies develop tourism. In searching for solutions, it is not unusual for researchers to advocate a standalone theory, model, or framework as a preferred approach. However, this method ignores the complexity of the real world and that solutions usually require a multidimensional approach based on combining various theoretical tools. This paper proposes an open architecture approach that utilizes a number of theories and models that can be selectively and collectively used to assist remote settlements develop a tourism sector. This approach was tested in Cooktown, Australia. One outcome was the identification of a range of deficiencies in the strategies currently used by the destination.

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Advances in Hospitality and Leisure
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-385-5

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Book part
Publication date: 30 November 2020

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Advances in Hospitality and Leisure
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-385-5

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 1999

Bruce Rigsby

Aboriginal people have property rights and interests in land and waters arising from traditional law and custom. Their traditional relationship to land is dual in…

Abstract

Aboriginal people have property rights and interests in land and waters arising from traditional law and custom. Their traditional relationship to land is dual in character, having spiritual and material dimensions; i.e. they belong to the land and they own it too. The root of their traditional aboriginal title is found in the creative acts of the ancestral Stories in the Story‐Time and from the unbroken links of spirit which connect them and their deceased ancestors with specific land and sea country.

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International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 26 no. 7/8/9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2002

Jock Collins

Recounts the history of the Chinese Diaspora in Australia, which dates back to the Gold Rush of the 1850s. In the past three decades, following the end of the white…

Abstract

Recounts the history of the Chinese Diaspora in Australia, which dates back to the Gold Rush of the 1850s. In the past three decades, following the end of the white Australia policy, many ethnic Chinese immigrants have immigrated to Australia. Although there are only 300,000 people of Chinese ancestry living in Australia, Chinese immigration is a critical chapter of Australia’s immigration experience. Chinese entrepreneurs have played a major role in the history of the Chinese in Australia. Explores the experience of Chinese entrepreneurs in Australia from the earliest days till the present and reviews historical accounts of Chinese entrepreneurs in Australia, before presenting the results of recent research. Argues that it is necessary to investigate how ethnicity, gender and class have intersected to shape changing patterns of Chinese entrepreneurship in the Australian Chinese Diaspora. Suggests also that the dynamics of Chinese immigration and Chinese entrepreneurship in Australia have been shaped by the changing dynamics of globalisation, the state and the racialisation of Chinese immigrants in the Australian labour market and society as a whole.

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International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 8 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2007

Zbigniew Bromberek

The argument presented in this paper is based on distinctive and exploitable differences which merit putting eco-tourists, eco-resorts and the coastal tropics into…

Abstract

The argument presented in this paper is based on distinctive and exploitable differences which merit putting eco-tourists, eco-resorts and the coastal tropics into categories of their own. Such differences should inform planning and design process when working in this environment, which is both very sensitive and valuable. The paper aims to describe the main characteristics of the coastal tropics as a climate targeted by eco-tourism. Differences between eco-tourists and residents are presented through definition of comfort. Climatic and other factors influencing comfort limits are at the core of discussion, in which passive design is seen as the most appropriate response to challenges of the tropical coast setting. The design opportunities for the desirable climate modifications in eco-friendly resorts together with some passive design features are briefly presented. These architectural design solutions are set against theoretical principles specific to tropical coastal regions. The focus is on human responses to environmental factors, and on their implications. The paper concludes with a few recommendations aimed to deliver indoor conditions consistent with climatic preferences of itinerant environmentally conscious users of buildings in the coastal tropics. Such an approach is expected to minimize impacts the facility will make on the environment.

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Open House International, vol. 32 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0168-2601

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