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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1992

Linda J. McKie and Roy C. Wood

Presents an analysis of data collected by questionnaire from 50respondents on their sources of recipes. The questionnaires werecompleted by men and women who were members…

Abstract

Presents an analysis of data collected by questionnaire from 50 respondents on their sources of recipes. The questionnaires were completed by men and women who were members of various groups and communities located in the Edinburgh area. The data are analysed in respect of gender, class, age variations and variations according to family size. Concludes that the recipe possesses a social significance that merits greater attention, for it is the starting point of many culinary and related activities. The implications of such findings for the food industry are manifold. Many respondents identified the purchase and receipt of cookery books, the collection of recipes, and the exchange of recipes as related activities. As such, the cultural significance of the recipe and its importance in food marketing cannot be underestimated.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 94 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2010

Richard N.S. Robinson, Charles V. Arcodia, Christina Tian and Phillip Charlton

Cookery has been identified as an occupation with skills shortages, at least in the developed world. There is currently a dearth of research into the cookery labour…

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1672

Abstract

Purpose

Cookery has been identified as an occupation with skills shortages, at least in the developed world. There is currently a dearth of research into the cookery labour market, its occupational culture and characteristics. This paper seeks to address this issue.

Design/methodology/approach

The study utilised a tracking approach to collate and investigate aspects of electronically‐listed job advertisements for cookery‐related vacancies in Australia's northern state of Queensland. Content analysis of advertised employment vacancies has previously been utilised as a method in tourism and hospitality research.

Findings

The findings support the proposition that industry demand exceeds labour supply. Moreover, the content analysis of the vacancies' characteristics suggest that a range of job advertisement details, including remuneration, is infrequently supplied.

Research limitations/implications

The study was limited in scope to cookery‐related vacancies and to those advertised for Queensland. Accounting for vacancy duplications and consequential vacancies were the two key analytical challenges. Future research with refined instruments and more generalisable samples is invited.

Originality/value

The study reveals that the increased electronicisation of information facilitates both the collection and generation of labour market research.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 22 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Article
Publication date: 10 October 2008

Richard N.S. Robinson and Charles Arcodia

This research paper aims to report on the findings of an innovative study to extract contemporaneous interpretations of Australian colonial domestic hospitality in Mrs

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842

Abstract

Purpose

This research paper aims to report on the findings of an innovative study to extract contemporaneous interpretations of Australian colonial domestic hospitality in Mrs. Lance Rawson's Cookery Book and Household Hints.

Design/methodology/approach

To dialogue with the text's original author, as free of time and space permutations as possible a hermeneutical approach is adopted. Hermeneutics has been successfully applied as an interpretative tool, to a range of tradition laden significant texts as it assists in the (constructive) deconstruction of texts so that the reader may use them as a portal into the past (its values and assumptions).

Findings

The findings of these textual analyses present a number of themes: the embedded notion of host/guest relations, especially as it transpires in “the bush”; the earliest impacts of indigenous and ethnic minorities on food production, its consumption and hence private hospitality; and evidence of a range of issues concerned with the management of a household. An Australian hospitality is also explored.

Research limitations/implications

Just as researchers have sought to identify an antipodean cuisine, this paper is a launch for understanding the origins of colonial hospitality, albeit from a private perspective.

Practical implications

The findings might assist the Australian hospitality industry in developing a regional service culture.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to emerging studies in hospitality, by deconstructing a colonial cookbook, via the medium of textual analysis, and underpinned by a hermeneutic interpretative paradigm.

Details

International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research, vol. 2 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6182

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1991

Jo Harvey

Jo Harvey describes the marketting ofthis popular margarine over the last 70years

Abstract

Jo Harvey describes the marketting of this popular margarine over the last 70 years

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 91 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 April 1999

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84

Abstract

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 99 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1980

Irene Finch

Some flour recipes clearly help our nutrition aims or can easily be modified to do so. They are the main subject of this article, in which some useful flour cookery

Abstract

Some flour recipes clearly help our nutrition aims or can easily be modified to do so. They are the main subject of this article, in which some useful flour cookery principles are introduced step by step. Many terms in flour cookery have such variable meanings that they can cause confusion, for example, drop scones, short, germ and cell, so I have tried for an unambiguous terminology.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 80 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 1994

C.J. Griffith, K.A. Mathias and P.E. Price

Studies have shown that domestic knowledge and practices relating to theprevention of food‐borne disease may be inadequate and that familyoutbreaks of food poisoning are…

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3073

Abstract

Studies have shown that domestic knowledge and practices relating to the prevention of food‐borne disease may be inadequate and that family outbreaks of food poisoning are numerically very important. The use of the mass media can be beneficial in health education and it could provide “cues to action” helping to improve domestic food hygiene. Members of the public were questioned about their desire for information on food hygiene and what sources of information they would use. Different components of the mass media were analysed for the information they provided on food safety and the results indicated they were an underutilized resource for food hygiene education. Provides recommendations that are inexpensive but could prove successful, and gives sources of appropriate advice.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 96 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1901

The institution of food and cookery exhibitions and the dissemination of practical knowledge with respect to cookery by means of lectures and demonstrations are excellent…

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43

Abstract

The institution of food and cookery exhibitions and the dissemination of practical knowledge with respect to cookery by means of lectures and demonstrations are excellent things in their way. But while it is important that better and more scientific attention should be generally given to the preparation of food for the table, it must be admitted to be at least equally important to insure that the food before it comes into the hands of the expert cook shall be free from adulteration, and as far as possible from impurity,—that it should be, in fact, of the quality expected. Protection up to a certain point and in certain directions is afforded to the consumer by penal enactments, and hitherto the general public have been disposed to believe that those enactments are in their nature and in their application such as to guarantee a fairly general supply of articles of tolerable quality. The adulteration laws, however, while absolutely necessary for the purpose of holding many forms of fraud in check, and particularly for keeping them within certain bounds, cannot afford any guarantees of superior, or even of good, quality. Except in rare instances, even those who control the supply of articles of food to large public and private establishments fail to take steps to assure themselves that the nature and quality of the goods supplied to them are what they are represented to be. The sophisticator and adulterator are always with us. The temptations to undersell and to misrepresent seem to be so strong that firms and individuals from whom far better things might reasonably be expected fall away from the right path with deplorable facility, and seek to save themselves, should they by chance be brought to book, by forms of quibbling and wriggling which are in themselves sufficient to show the moral rottenness which can be brought about by an insatiable lust for gain. There is, unfortunately, cheating to be met with at every turn, and it behoves at least those who control the purchase and the cooking of food on the large scale to do what they can to insure the supply to them of articles which have not been tampered with, and which are in all respects of proper quality, both by insisting on being furnished with sufficiently authoritative guarantees by the vendors, and by themselves causing the application of reasonably frequent scientific checks upon the quality of the goods.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 3 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 24 June 2009

Louise Shaw

Like many of his generation George George, the director of Auckland’s Seddon Memorial Technical College (1902‐22), considered marriage and motherhood as women’s true

Abstract

Like many of his generation George George, the director of Auckland’s Seddon Memorial Technical College (1902‐22), considered marriage and motherhood as women’s true vocation and believed in separate but equal education for girls that included some domestic training. In this regard, New Zealand historians often cite him as an advocate for the cult of domesticity, a prescriptive ideology that came to be reflected in the government’s education policy during this period. But as Joanne Scott, Catherine Manathunga and Noeline Kyle have demonstrated with regard to technical education in Queensland, rhetoric does not always match institutional practice. Other factors, most notably student demand, but also more pragmatic concerns such as the availability of accommodation, staffing and specialist equipment, can shape the curriculum. Closer scrutiny of surviving institutional records such as prospectuses, enrolment data and the director’s reports to the Department of Education, allow us to explore more fully who was given access to particular kinds of knowledge and resources, how long a particular course might take, the choices students made, what was commonplace and what was unusual, and what students might expect once they completed their studies.

Details

History of Education Review, vol. 38 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0819-8691

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Article
Publication date: 4 April 2016

Sandra P Fordyce-Voorham

The purpose of this paper is to test an hypothesis that teachers’ personal orientations toward food preparation, nutrition and environmental issues would be related to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to test an hypothesis that teachers’ personal orientations toward food preparation, nutrition and environmental issues would be related to their perceived importance of food skills.

Design/methodology/approach

Little research has been conducted on home economics teachers’ views on the importance of the food skills they teach in secondary schools in Australia. Therefore, an online survey was conducted among 261 home economics teachers in Australian secondary schools. The research measured respondents’ ratings of the importance of 70 food skills as well as their teaching preferences and use of resources.

Findings

Respondents rated the procedural “hands-on” skills required to prepare a healthy meal as most important. Exploratory factor analysis derived five components (procedures for domestic settings, procedures for vocational settings, cookery methods, food economy, using microwave oven appliances) relating to teachers’ perceived importance of food skills. Teachers’ personal orientations were described as food aesthete, consumer-environmentalist and nutritionist. The findings showed that these were better predictors of the perceived importance of food skills than demographic characteristics. The most important perceived skills related to the basic procedures required by young people to be able to prepare meals for themselves when living independently. Teachers’ personal “orientations” were significantly related to the perceived importance of food skills. Demographic and professional characteristics were poor predictors of these perceptions.

Originality/value

The findings provide home economics teachers with an understanding of their selection of particular food skills to teach their students in skill-based healthy eating programmes.

Details

Health Education, vol. 116 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

Keywords

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