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Article
Publication date: 8 May 2009

Stefano Caneppele, Francesco Calderoni and Sara Martocchia

The paper aims at expanding knowledge on the presence of organized criminal groups in public contract procurement in the south of Italy. It seeks to highlight how the…

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims at expanding knowledge on the presence of organized criminal groups in public contract procurement in the south of Italy. It seeks to highlight how the capabilities of law enforcement agencies could be enhanced by means of criminological models.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper sets out a criminological model with which to assess the general and specific risks of the infiltration of public procurement in the south of Italy by organized crime (OC).

Findings

According to the geographical risk assessment, infiltration by OC of public procurement seems to be widespread in some areas of south Italy, especially Sicily, Calabria and Campania. On the other hand, the specific risk may increase according to certain features of the company and its representatives, the value of the contract, the low specialization of the activities required by the public contract.

Originality/value

The paper describes a criminological model with which to assess the general and specific risk of infiltration by OC of public procurement in south Italy.

Details

Journal of Money Laundering Control, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1368-5201

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 4 May 2020

Murat Gunduz and Hesham Ahmed Elsherbeny

This paper covers the development of a multidimensional contract administration performance model (CAPM) for construction projects. The proposed CAPM is intended to be…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper covers the development of a multidimensional contract administration performance model (CAPM) for construction projects. The proposed CAPM is intended to be used by the industry stakeholders to measure the construction contract administration (CCA) performance and identify the strengths and weaknesses of the CCA system for running or completed projects.

Design/methodology/approach

The research design follows a sequential mixed methodology of qualitative and quantitative data collection and analysis. In the first phase, contract administration indicators were collected from relevant literature. In the second phase, an online questionnaire was prepared, and data were collected and analyzed using the crisp value of fuzzy membership function, and structural equation modeling (SEM). The fuzzy set was chosen for this study due to the presence of uncertainty and fuzziness associated with the importance of several key indicators affecting the CCA performance. Finally, SEM was used to test and analyze interrelationships among constructs of CCA performance.

Findings

The data collected from 336 construction professionals worldwide through an online survey was utilized to develop the fuzzy structural equation model. The goodness-of-fit and reliability tests validated the model. The study concluded a significant correlation between CCA performance, CCA operational indicators, and the process groups.

Originality/value

The contribution of this paper to the existing knowledge is the development of a fuzzy structural equation model that serves as a measurement tool for the contract administration performance. This is the first quantitative structural equation model to capture contract administration performance. The model consists of 93 Construction Contract Administration(CCA) performance indicators categorized into 11 project management process groups namely: project governance and start-up; team management; communication and relationship management; quality and acceptance management; performance monitoring and reporting management; document and record management; financial management; changes and control management; claims and dispute resolution management; contract risk management and contract closeout management.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 27 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

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Article
Publication date: 12 June 2007

Chad Lin, Graham Pervan and Donald McDermid

The main purpose of this paper is threefold: to understand public‐sector outsourcing in Australia; to examine the linkage between IS/IT outsourcing and the use of…

Abstract

Purpose

The main purpose of this paper is threefold: to understand public‐sector outsourcing in Australia; to examine the linkage between IS/IT outsourcing and the use of evaluation methodologies; and to identify issues that are critical in evaluating and managing IS/IT outsourcing contracts in public‐sector organizations.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey of the top 500 Australian organizations and two in‐depth case studies of two Australian public‐sector organizations were conducted.

Findings

Several key issues for IS/IT outsourcing were identified – problems in evaluating outsourcing contracts, embedded contract mentality, ability to manage contracts, and staff transition management.

Practical implications

Outsourcing organizations need to implement changes carefully and assess their in‐house capabilities. They also need to fully understand and apply the IS/IT investment evaluation and benefits realization processes. In order to reach the magnitude of improvements ascribed to IS/IT outsourcing organizations need to undertake proper risk assessment and effectively manage outsourcing relationships. These all have to be done before and during the vendor/technology selection assessment and contract negotiation process.

Originality/value

IS/IT outsourcing in the public sector is particularly under‐studied. This study identifies several key issues for organizations undertaking IS/IT outsourcing. Recommendations are provided to assist outsourcing organizations in dealing with these issues.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. 20 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

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Article
Publication date: 5 March 2018

Moza Tahnoon Al Nahyan, Yaser E. Hawas, Mohsin Raza, Hamad Aljassmi, Munjed A. Maraqa, Basil Basheerudeen and Mohammad Sherif Mohammad

The purpose of this paper is to present a framework to devise a system for ranking of traditional project delivery methods, regarding their suitability, against the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present a framework to devise a system for ranking of traditional project delivery methods, regarding their suitability, against the varying levels of mega project attributes.

Design/methodology/approach

The proposed system employs input and output interfaces and a granular (fuzzy rule base) component for estimating the subjective levels of risks, opportunities, and constraints and then mapping them to a decision matrix. A questionnaire has been designed (using the SurveyGizmo® platform) to collect the perceptions of the various project stakeholders and use them. A total of 127 stakeholders completed the survey form in full.

Findings

The survey data were used to calibrate the fuzzy logic model of the granular component. The envisioned system computes, for each possible delivery method, an index that reflects the suitability (of the corresponding delivery method) on an ordinal scale.

Originality/value

The devised decision support system is likely to lessen the dependency of “accurate decision” on “the experience of the decision-makers.” It will also enable ranking the various project delivery methods based on the various project and stakeholder attributes that are likely to affect the project risks, opportunities and constraints.

Details

International Journal of Managing Projects in Business, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8378

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2005

K. Lawson

This paper compares and contrasts two approaches to the treatment of pipeline corrosion “risk” – the probabilistic approach and the more traditional, deterministic…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper compares and contrasts two approaches to the treatment of pipeline corrosion “risk” – the probabilistic approach and the more traditional, deterministic approach. The paper aims to discuss the merits and potential pitfalls of each approach.

Design/methodology/approach

Provides an outline of each approach. The probabilistic approach to the assessment of pipeline corrosion risks deals with many of the uncertainties that are common to the data employed and those with regard to the predictive models that are used also. Rather than considering each input parameter as an average value the approach considers the inputs as a series of probability density functions, the collective use during the assessment of risk yields a risk profile that is quantified on the basis of uncertain data. This approach differs from the traditional deterministic assessment in that the output yields a curve that shows how the “risk” of failure increases with time. The pipeline operator simply chooses the level of risk that is acceptable and then devises a strategy to deal with those risks. The traditional (deterministic) approach merely segments the output risks as either “high”, “medium” or “low”; a strategy for managing is devised based on the selection of an appropriate time interval to allow a reasonable prospect of detecting deterioration before the pipeline corrosion allowance is exceeded, or no longer complies with code. Applies both approaches to the case of a 16.1 km long, 14 in. main export line in the North Sea.

Findings

The deterministic assessment yielded a worst‐case failure probability of “medium” with a corresponding consequence of “high”; classifications that are clearly subjective. The probabilistic assessments quantified pipeline failure probabilities, although it is important to note that more effort was required when performing such an assessment. Using target probabilities for “high” and “normal” consequence pipeline segments, indications were that between 8.5 and 13 years was the time period for which the target (predicted) failure probabilities would be reached, again depending on how effective corrosion mitigation activities are in practice. Basing pipeline inspections in particular on the outputs from the deterministic assessment would therefore be conservative in this instance; but this may not necessarily always be so. That the probabilistic assessment indicates that inspections justifiably may be extended beyond that suggested by the deterministic assessment is a clear benefit, in that it affords the opportunity to defer expenditure on pipeline inspections to a later date, but it may be the case that the converse may be required. It may be argued therefore, that probabilistic assessment provides a superior basis for driving pipeline corrosion management activities given that the approach deals with the uncertainties in the basic input data.

Originality/value

A probabilistic assessment approach that effectively mirrors pipeline operations, provides a superior basis upon which to manage risk and would therefore likely maximize both safety and business performance.

Details

Anti-Corrosion Methods and Materials, vol. 52 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0003-5599

Keywords

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Abstract

Details

Flexible Urban Transportation
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-08-050656-2

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Case study
Publication date: 3 December 2020

Dayashankar Maurya, Amit Kumar Srivastava and Sulagna Mukherjee

The central lesson to be learned from studying the case is to understand the challenges and constraints posed by contextual conditions in designing contracts in…

Abstract

Learning outcomes

The central lesson to be learned from studying the case is to understand the challenges and constraints posed by contextual conditions in designing contracts in public–private partnerships (PPP) for financing and delivering health care in emerging economies such as India.

Case overview/synopsis

Perverse incentives, along with contextual conditions, led to extensive opportunistic behaviors among involved agencies, limiting the effectiveness of otherwise highly regarded innovative design of the program.

Complexity academic level

India’s “Rashtriya Swasthya Bima Yojana” or National Health Insurance Program, launched in 2007 provided free health insurance coverage to protect millions of low-income families from getting pushed into poverty due to catastrophic health-care expenditure. The program was implemented through a PPP using standardized contracts between multiple stakeholders from the public and private sector – insurance companies, hospitals, intermediaries, the provincial and federal government.

Supplementary materials

Teaching Notes are available for educators only.

Subject code

CSS: 10 Public Sector Management.

Details

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2045-0621

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 9 November 2012

Wei Ping He

The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of China's contemporary banking regulatory system, with particular focus on regulatory control of foreign banks trading…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of China's contemporary banking regulatory system, with particular focus on regulatory control of foreign banks trading in China. The paper addresses three aspects of Chinese banking regulation: what does China regulate; why does China regulate; and how does China regulate. Much of the discussion is concerned with China's regulatory agencies particularly with the role of the CBRC as the principal regulator in China's banking sector.

Design/methodology/approach

In the first instance the paper presents an overview of banking regulatory models gained from a review of theoretical literature in the area. Then through a wide ranging review of Chinese publications, both academic and official, the paper seeks to relate the course of regulatory reform in China, both in terms of compliance with orthodox regulatory theory, and the unique regulatory requirements of the Chinese banking system.

Findings

The paper recognises that China has embraced the need for banking regulation with the establishment of an institutional structure that is responsive to both banking supervision and government policy. Within that structure the role of the CBRC, the pervasive manner in which that agency operates, and the content of its regulatory output have been identified and critically reviewed.

Originality/value

In its review of the modernization of China's banking regulatory system, the paper achieves originality from the author's research into, and critical reflections on Chinese generated literature, both institutional and academic, which is then communicated in a manner that will be understood by readers familiar with Western banking regulatory theory.

Details

Journal of Financial Regulation and Compliance, vol. 20 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1358-1988

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 27 September 2011

Zahran Al‐Salti and Ray Hackney

The purpose of this study is to investigate the key factors that facilitate or inhibit knowledge transfer success from vendors to clients in information systems (IS) outsourcing.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate the key factors that facilitate or inhibit knowledge transfer success from vendors to clients in information systems (IS) outsourcing.

Design/methodology/approach

The collection of data rested on semi‐structured interviews with IS/IT managers at various levels of the subject organizations and careful documents analysis.

Findings

The findings suggest that knowledge transfer success in IS outsourcing is affected by four sets of factors: knowledge‐related, client‐related, vendor‐related and relationship‐related.

Practical implications

This study may provide some useful insights for IS managers on how to manage knowledge transfer in IS outsourcing projects and better understand the key factors that impact its success.

Research limitations/implications

This study investigated the client's perceptive only which is one side of the knowledge transfer process. A balanced understanding of the research questions (i.e. from both sides: client and vendor) permits a fuller examination and comparison between the perceptions of the two sides of the relationship.

Originality/value

The value and the originality of this study come from the fact that knowledge transfer in IS outsourcing has not been comprehensively explored. Previous research fails to provide a complete understanding of the factors that impact knowledge transfer success as most are focused on the type of knowledge transferred, the client, the vendor or the relationship between the client and the vendor.

Details

Journal of Enterprise Information Management, vol. 24 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0398

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 7 April 2015

David Pollitt

Abstract

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 47 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

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