Search results

1 – 10 of over 2000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 6 May 2021

Tae-Hyung Pyo, JaeHwan Kwon, Thomas Gruca and Dhananjay Nayakankuppam

The endowment effect is arguably one of the most robust phenomena documented in economics, behavioral decision theory and consumer research. However, the endowment effect…

Abstract

Purpose

The endowment effect is arguably one of the most robust phenomena documented in economics, behavioral decision theory and consumer research. However, the endowment effect has traditionally been studied as a fairly static phenomenon at the transactional level of analysis.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper documents this “contagious” endowment effect using lab experiments and such field data as eBay transactions and discuss the managerial implication of these findings.

Findings

This study suggests that the endowment effect is not limited to the level of the specific object, but can manifest itself with the more abstract class of objects to which a specific object happens to belong.

Research limitations/implications

A logical next step would be to examine the boundary conditions – how similar does the subsequent object have to be for the endowment effect to transfer over to it? A related aspect would be whether there are boundary conditions arising from the quality of the endowment.

Practical implications

The effects reported here probably underlie the success of the many types of “bait and switch” schemes that have been used by the more unsavory type of marketer. As such, these findings might have implications for policy in the area of consumer protection.

Originality/value

This paper argues for and presents evidence consistent with the notion that the endowment effect is dynamic and can be transferred from one transaction to another and refer to this generalization of the endowment effect to other, similar products as “contagious endowment.”

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 22 November 2012

John L. Lastovicka and Chadwick J. Miller

Purpose – We examine the meanings of objects that have indexical (or direct first-hand) connections to celebrities. In so doing, we distinguish between the meanings of…

Abstract

Purpose – We examine the meanings of objects that have indexical (or direct first-hand) connections to celebrities. In so doing, we distinguish between the meanings of proximal indexicality versus contagious indexicality. We reveal how these disparate meanings are linked to how consumers use a celebrity object, either by displaying the object or by using the object as the celebrity had originally used the object.

Methodology – Our informants were consumers participating in sales of celebrity-owned items. Data include videotaped depth interviews, photographs of auction participants and celebrity objects, field notes, and auction catalogue descriptions.

Findings – Some consumers were fans who desired to be close to the celebrity, while others participating in celebrity-object auctions desired to become a celebrity themselves. Those that desired to be close to the celebrity (fans) were attracted to the proximal indexical meaning of the object, in which an indexical link conveyed a perceived closeness between the perceiver and the signified (e.g., consumer and celebrity) through the indexically linked object. Those that desired to become a celebrity themselves were attracted to the contagious indexical meaning of the object which facilitates a perceived contamination of the perceiver (e.g., consumer) by the essence of the signified (e.g., celebrity) through the indexically linked object.

Contributions – We contribute to the Peircian semiotic framework as used in consumer research by differentiating between the meanings of proximal indexicality and contagious indexicality. We show these meanings are linked to consumers’ display use versus the original use of the celebrity-owned object.

Details

Research in Consumer Behavior
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-022-2

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 9 February 2004

NICOLAAS J. VRIEND

Abstract

Details

Economic Complexity
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-44451-433-2

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 23 September 2005

Hans O. Melberg

This chapter argues that models trying to explain the spread of drug use should not be based on standard epidemiological models developed to describe the spread of…

Abstract

This chapter argues that models trying to explain the spread of drug use should not be based on standard epidemiological models developed to describe the spread of infectious diseases. The main weaknesses of the standard model are the lack of attention to micro-foundations and the inappropriateness of several of its assumptions in the context of drug use. An approach based on mechanisms and social interaction is argued to provide a promising alternative to the standard approach. To illustrate this, a model of the spread of drugs based on two mechanisms has been developed (observational learning and social stigma). Lastly, some of the difficulties in testing and deriving policy implications in these models are discussed.

Details

Substance Use: Individual Behaviour, Social Interactions, Markets and Politics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-361-7

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 7 August 2017

K. Hazel Kwon and Anatoliy Gruzd

The purpose of this paper is to explore the spillover effects of offensive commenting in online community from the lens of emotional and behavioral contagion…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the spillover effects of offensive commenting in online community from the lens of emotional and behavioral contagion. Specifically, it examines the contagion of swearing – a linguistic mannerism that conveys high-arousal emotion – based upon two mechanisms of contagion: mimicry and social interaction effect.

Design/methodology/approach

The study performs a series of mixed-effect logistic regressions to investigate the contagious potential of offensive comments collected from YouTube in response to Donald Trump’s 2016 presidential campaign videos posted between January and April 2016.

Findings

The study examines non-random incidences of two types of swearing online: public and interpersonal. Findings suggest that a first-level (a.k.a. parent) comment’s public swearing tends to trigger chains of interpersonal swearing in the second-level (a.k.a. child) comments. Meanwhile, among the child-comments, a sequentially preceding comment’s swearing is contagious to the following comment only across the same swearing type. Based on the findings, the study concludes that offensive comments are contagious and have impact on shaping the community-wide linguistic norms of online user interactions.

Originality/value

The study discusses the ways in which an individual’s display of offensiveness may influence and shape discursive cultures on the internet. This study delves into the mechanisms of text-based contagion by differentiating between mimicry effect and social interaction effect. While online emotional contagion research to this date has focused on the difference between positive and negative valence, internet research that specifically looks at the contagious potential of offensive expressions remains sparse.

Details

Internet Research, vol. 27 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 21 August 2017

Lauren S. Elkin, Kamil Topal and Gurkan Bebek

Predicting future outbreaks and understanding how they are spreading from location to location can improve patient care provided. Recently, mining social media big data…

Abstract

Purpose

Predicting future outbreaks and understanding how they are spreading from location to location can improve patient care provided. Recently, mining social media big data provided the ability to track patterns and trends across the world. This study aims to analyze social media micro-blogs and geographical locations to understand how disease outbreaks spread over geographies and to enhance forecasting of future disease outbreaks.

Design/methodology/approach

In this paper, the authors use Twitter data as the social media data source, influenza-like illnesses (ILI) as disease epidemic and states in the USA as geographical locations. They present a novel network-based model to make predictions about the spread of diseases a week in advance utilizing social media big data.

Findings

The authors showed that flu-related tweets align well with ILI data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) (p < 0.049). The authors compared this model to earlier approaches that utilized airline traffic, and showed that ILI activity estimates of their model were more accurate. They also found that their disease diffusion model yielded accurate predictions for upcoming ILI activity (p < 0.04), and they predicted the diffusion of flu across states based on geographical surroundings at 76 per cent accuracy. The equations and procedures can be translated to apply to any social media data, other contagious diseases and geographies to mine large data sets.

Originality/value

First, while extensive work has been presented utilizing time-series analysis on single geographies, or post-analysis of highly contagious diseases, no previous work has provided a generalized solution to identify how contagious diseases diffuse across geographies, such as states in the USA. Secondly, due to nature of the social media data, various statistical models have been extensively used to address these problems.

Details

Information Discovery and Delivery, vol. 45 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-6247

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 12 September 2016

Ki-Ryoung Lee, Chan-Ik Jo and Hyung-Geun Kim

Existing research has theoretically modeled conditional correlations between the long-term interest rates as a function of macroeconomic variable. In line with it, the…

Abstract

Purpose

Existing research has theoretically modeled conditional correlations between the long-term interest rates as a function of macroeconomic variable. In line with it, the purpose of this paper is to explore whether conditional correlations can be a new signal to predict recessions. Furthermore, this paper also tries to investigate among the four factors – the time difference of the beginning and the end of recessions, financial integration (FI), and trade integration (TI) – which factors drive the direction of change in conditional correlations. Finally, this paper is to explain the implication for Korea trade.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses a probit regression model for 33 country during the period from 1972 to 2015. To measure the time-varying interest rates conditional correlations, a VAR(1)-DBEKK-GARCH(1,1) model is adopted due to its statistical advantages. Furthermore, the authors also construct the four measures – time difference of the beginning of recessions (BEG), time difference of the end of recessions (END), FI, and TI. The authors first study the predictive power of correlations in both in and out-samples test, and study which factors determine the different behavior of interest rate co-movements using the four measures.

Findings

The empirical results show that the conditional correlations between the long-term interest rates of the USA and individual countries contain information about recessions a few quarters ahead which term spreads of neither individual countries nor the USA conveyed in. However, there is a heterogeneity of the significance and direction of interest rate correlations. A further research reveals that especially the heterogeneous degree of TI leads to the different overlapped recession period of individual countries with the USA, resulting in heterogeneous behavior of interest rates among countries.

Research limitations/implications

As a limitation of this paper, the forecasting power of interest rate correlations is not always significant in all countries. Despite this, the study has a profound implication that for those countries where the US accounts for the high proportion of trade, increase in conditional correlations can be a signal for future recessions. Especially, given a considerable portion of trade in GDP and the more sensitive trade activity of Korea to a contagious recession than a domestic recession, the conditional correlation measure is particularly useful for Korean policy makers.

Originality/value

Although many papers model interest rate co-movement as a function of macroeconomic condition, this paper provides the first evidence to show interest rate co-movement precede the macro shocks empirically. Furthermore, this paper determines the precise channel through which TI affects the time-varying behavior of interest rate co-movements before recessions.

Details

Journal of Korea Trade, vol. 20 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1229-828X

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 16 August 2019

Hong Thi Hoa Nguyen, Dat Tien Nguyen and Anh Hong Pham

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effects of share repurchase announcements on the stock price of rival firms in the same industry in Vietnam during 2010–2017.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effects of share repurchase announcements on the stock price of rival firms in the same industry in Vietnam during 2010–2017.

Design/methodology/approach

Both event study and t-test are employed to test the effects of share repurchase announcements on rival firms. In addition, cross-sectional analysis by ordinary least square regression is also applied for investigating the heterogeneous effects due to information transfer.

Findings

The finding shows that stock repurchase announcements result in a positive and significant valuation effect for both announcing firms and rival firms in Vietnam. Furthermore, the degree of signal to the industry is conditional on the degree of signal about the announcing firms as a contagious effect. Intra-industry effects are more favorable when profit performance of rival firms is good and when leverage of rival firms is low.

Practical implications

Rival firms can seize opportunities surrounding share repurchase announcements in the same industry in Vietnam. However, due to firm characteristics, intra-industry effects of stock repurchases differ among industries.

Originality/value

By examining different methods, the paper attributes valuable results to investigate the stock price behavior of rival firms in the same industry when firms announce stock repurchase in Vietnam.

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 17 July 2017

Selcen Ozturkcan, Nihat Kasap, Muge Cevik and Tauhid Zaman

Twitter usage during Gezi Park Protests, a significant large-scale connective action, is analyzed to reveal meaningful findings on individual and group tweeting…

Abstract

Purpose

Twitter usage during Gezi Park Protests, a significant large-scale connective action, is analyzed to reveal meaningful findings on individual and group tweeting characteristics. Subsequent to the Arab Spring in terms of its timing, the Gezi Park Protests began by the spread of news on construction plans to build a shopping mall at a public park in Taksim Square in Istanbul on May 26, 2013. Though started as a small-scale local protest, it emerged into a series of multi-regional social protests, also known as the Gezi Park demonstrations. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors sought answers to three important research questions: whether Twitter usage is reflective of real life events, what Twitter is actually used for, and is Twitter usage contagious? The authors have collected streamed data from Twitter. As a research methodology, the authors followed social media analytics framework proposed by Fan and Gordon (2014), which included three consecutive processes; capturing, understanding, and presenting. An analysis of 54 million publicly available tweets and 3.5 million foursquare check-ins, which account to randomly selected 1 percent of all tweets and check-ins posted from Istanbul, Turkey between March and September 2013 are presented.

Findings

A perceived lack of sufficient media coverage on events taking place on the streets is believed to result in Turkish protestors’ use of Twitter as a medium to share and get information on ongoing and planned demonstrations, to learn the recent news, to participate in the debate, and to create local and global awareness.

Research limitations/implications

Data collection via streamed tweets comes with certain limitations. Twitter restricts data collection on publicly available tweets and only allows randomly selected 1 percent of all tweets posted from a specific region. Therefore, the authors’ data include only tweets of publicly available Twitter profiles. The generalizability of the findings should be regarded with concerning this limitation.

Practical implications

The authors conclude that Twitter was used mainly as a platform to exchange information to organize street demonstrations.

Originality/value

The authors conclude that Twitter usage reflected Street movements on a chronological level. Finally, the authors present that Twitter usage is contagious whereas tweeting is not necessarily.

Details

Aslib Journal of Information Management, vol. 69 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-3806

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 23 September 2009

David H. Tobey and Michael R. Manning

Recent research in cognitive and social psychology finds that individual change is more emotional than rational. Further evidence suggests that the contagious power of…

Abstract

Recent research in cognitive and social psychology finds that individual change is more emotional than rational. Further evidence suggests that the contagious power of emotions explains how groups may overcome obstacles and behave in unified ways. We offer a neuropsychological model of emotion-driven change in organizations that explains these findings and predicts conditions in which contagion effects will be successful in facilitating rapid change. Our model posits that emotive precursors to conscious action enable goal alignment and overcome cognitive resource limitations necessary to sustain organizational change over time. Our model adapts the findings from social and cognitive neuroscience to bring new insights into the mental mechanisms underlying the change process. The chapter concludes with tentative suggestions for developing new methods for research and practice that improve our predictive capability for creating rapid large-scale organizational change.

Details

Research in Organizational Change and Development
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-547-1

1 – 10 of over 2000