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1 – 10 of over 69000
Article
Publication date: 27 June 2022

Frank Badu-Baiden, Seongseop (Sam) Kim, Felix Elvis Otoo and Brian King

This study aims to examine international tourists’ local African food consumption experiences by using an attribute–benefit–value–intention (ABVI) framework.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine international tourists’ local African food consumption experiences by using an attribute–benefit–value–intention (ABVI) framework.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 336 respondents were collected in Ghana, Africa. A series of quantitative research methods were used in the data analysis to explicate the relationships.

Findings

By assessing critical structural relationships, 8 out of 14 hypothetical relationships were found to be empirically supported. They include the paths between food novelty, restaurant quality and food quality as antecedents of epistemic value, the path between restaurant quality and food quality and the path between restaurant quality and consumption value.

Originality/value

This study establishes the psychological mechanism behind tourists’ local food consumption experiences and further extends the utility of the consumption value theory and ABVI framework into the local food experience context. It confirms that tourists’ local food consumption experiences involve a sequential psychological process involving local food attribute evaluation, benefits sought, consumption values and future intention. This study offers a thorough explanation of variables that are crucial to promoting indigenous ethnic food consumption experience.

Details

Tourism Review, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1660-5373

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 April 2022

Ruizhi Yuan, Martin J. Liu and Markus Blut

This study aims to examine the impact of five consumption values (i.e. ecological, functional, symbolic, experiential and epistemic) on consumers’ intentions to adopt…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the impact of five consumption values (i.e. ecological, functional, symbolic, experiential and epistemic) on consumers’ intentions to adopt green products. Using Thaler’s utility theory, the authors investigate the indirect effect of values on purchase intention through acquisition utility and transaction utility. Two moderators (materialism orientation and value consciousness) further influence the strength of the effect of consumption values on transaction utility.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors used a survey design (N = 437 Chinese customers recruited through a Chinese online panel provider) and structural equation modeling (SEM) to test six hypothesized relationships in the proposed model. Moderated SEM was used for moderation analysis.

Findings

Most hypothesized relationships in the model were confirmed, with the exception of the functional value–transaction utility link and the moderating effect of materialism on the experiential value–transaction utility relationship.

Research limitations/implications

Larger-scale research may help to determine whether there are more significant differences in consumer evaluations of different types of green products.

Practical implications

As the concept of green marketing in China evolves, firms should continue to stress the importance and value of green products regarding individuals’ care for the environment, status and self-image. Further, firms should conduct systematic utility analyses and address acquisition and price equity in a strategic process.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this study is the first to adapt utility theory to green consumption and proposes a clearly defined and well-substantiated set of utility types by merging economic and green consumption literature.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 56 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 29 October 2020

Karim Marini Thomé, Giselle Cappellesso and Guilherme Mata Pinho

This article aims to explore the influence of values concerning food consumption and the effect of physical activity habit moderation on these.

Abstract

Purpose

This article aims to explore the influence of values concerning food consumption and the effect of physical activity habit moderation on these.

Design/methodology/approach

The consumption value theory was used as a base, and a survey with 292 participants was analysed by means of factor analysis and structural equation modelling.

Findings

The findings are presented at three levels. The first is the clustering of food consumption habits in different dimensions: healthy, unhealthy and hybrid. The second is the relationship between values and food consumption. In detail: (1) emotional value is the only significant measurement for the consumption of the three food dimensions; (2) social value is a significant measurement for healthy food consumption; (3) conditional value is significant for the consumption of hybrid and unhealthy foods; (4) epistemic value has significance in the consumption of hybrid foods; (5) functional value is denied for all dimensions. The third concerns the relationship between value perceptions and food consumption moderated by physical activity in: (1) social value of healthy foods; (2) functional value of hybrid foods; and (3) emotional and epistemic values of unhealthy foods.

Originality/value

This paper adds to the literature on consumption values and raises new insights into value and habits regarding food consumption, such as physical activity involved in the consumption context.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 123 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 30 January 2019

Seongseop (Sam) Kim and Ja Young (Jacey) Choe

This study aims to examine the attribute-benefit-value-intention (ABVI) model of local food consumption as perceived by foreign tourists. The model was designed to test…

1325

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the attribute-benefit-value-intention (ABVI) model of local food consumption as perceived by foreign tourists. The model was designed to test the structural relationships between local food attributes, perceived benefits, consumption value and behavioral intentions.

Design/methodology/approach

The structural relationships of foreign tourists’ perceptions of local food consumption were conceptualized, and hypotheses were proposed. The main survey was conducted using a large sample of 1,323 tourists in Hong Kong.

Findings

“Food quality”, “food novelty” and “restaurant quality” significantly affected “emotional” and “epistemic benefit”. “Emotional benefit” had a significant effect on “consumption value” and “behavioral intention”, while “epistemic benefit” only influenced “consumption value”.

Practical implications

Local food marketers and DMOs need to promote the product features that are relevant to tourists’ benefits. Restaurant marketers need to develop distinctive strategies for tourists from different national backgrounds.

Originality/value

This study proposed and empirically tested a new model of tourists’ local food consumption, including two benefits, consumption value and behavioral intention.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 31 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 September 2016

Ying Wang

The increased income and modernity have greatly impacted Chinese consumers’ attitudes and purchasing behavior, making them more sophisticated than ever before. The purpose…

2258

Abstract

Purpose

The increased income and modernity have greatly impacted Chinese consumers’ attitudes and purchasing behavior, making them more sophisticated than ever before. The purpose of this paper is to examine the interrelationship among social stratification, materialism, post-materialism, and consumption values contributing uniquely to understanding Chinese consumers in the context of drastic economic and social changes.

Design/methodology/approach

Survey method was used to test the proposed model and answer the research questions. The data were collected in Shanghai, the largest city on the eastern coast of China. A multi-stage random sampling strategy was employed to acquire a representative sample of the population in the city. A total of 2,910 completed questionnaires were used for data analysis.

Findings

The results show that objective social status has a negative effect on post-materialism, whereas subjective social status has a positive effect. Social status does not seem to have a significant effect on materialism. Post-materialism also has a strong positive effect on the consumption orientations of emotional value and social value.

Practical implications

China was chosen as the research context in this study. As a booming emerging market, China provides an intriguing platform to examine social stratification and materialism. At the macro level, China is developing a new social structure due to the drastic social and economic changes. At the individual consumer level, as China moves further into a market-oriented economy, traditional Chinese values have changed rapidly. Western consumption values and phenomena such as overspending and conspicuous consumption have begun to take hold in China, especially among young people. It is critical for business managers to understand the shift of consumption values among Chinese in order to successfully capture this market.

Originality/value

A cursory review of past literature reveals that researchers have examined materialism primarily along two avenues: one puts materialism within a macro framework involving political interest or civic engagement (e.g. Davis et al., 1999; Inglehart, 1990); the other one takes a micro perspective exploring the impact of materialism on consumer attitudes and behavior (e.g. Park and Rabolt, 2009; Xiao and Kim, 2009). However, little research has been conducted linking the two approaches. The present study intends to examine the interrelationship among social stratification, materialism, post-materialism, and consumption values. Hopefully, it will shed some light on the connection between macro environment and micro consumer behavior. Furthermore, the current research provides evidences for the emerging transformation to a post-materialistic marketplace.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 28 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 April 2022

Dohyung Bang, Kyuwan Choi and Alex Jiyoung Kim

Receiving Michelin stars is considered an effective marketing tool and a prestigious certification in the restaurant industry. However, the direct effects of Michelin…

Abstract

Purpose

Receiving Michelin stars is considered an effective marketing tool and a prestigious certification in the restaurant industry. However, the direct effects of Michelin stars on restaurant performance remain unclear. To bridge this gap, this study aims to empirically validate the “Michelin effect” on the consumption values of restaurant patrons before and after receiving Michelin stars.

Design/methodology/approach

The data, collected from OpenTable, consist of over 160,000 reviews written for 218 restaurants, including 109 Michelin-starred (treatment group) and 109 nonstarred restaurants (control group). The authors measure perceived consumption value using the collected user-generated review data. The authors estimate fixed-effect difference-in-differences regressions to validate the Michelin effect.

Findings

Michelin stars enhance social, hedonic and service quality values, which are nonfunctional values. However, no significant effects on functional consumption values, such as economic, food quality and ambience quality values, are observed, even though Michelin stars are pure awards for kitchen performance.

Practical implications

Michelin stars can be an effective marketing tool for fine-dining restaurants because customers consider emotional and nonfunctional benefits such as hedonic and social values, which are more important than functional benefits such as food value. Furthermore, Michelin effects are heterogeneous depending on the number of stars awarded, price range and customers’ gastronomic involvement. These offer a strong rationale for monitoring social media, which may help managers better understand their customers and improve their performance.

Originality/value

This study extends the current literature on the Michelin effect by quantifying consumption values using user-generated review data. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this study offers the first empirical evidence that directly validates the Michelin effect.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 34 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 September 2021

Stephanie D. Atkinson and Jiyun Kang

Given the unclear lines between traditional and newly emerged luxury, this research aims to explore which luxury consumption values are important to young consumers (aged…

1539

Abstract

Purpose

Given the unclear lines between traditional and newly emerged luxury, this research aims to explore which luxury consumption values are important to young consumers (aged 18–44) in the USA and how such new luxury consumption is driven by their personal values. This research thus has two aims. The first is to define new luxury by examining the consumption values that distinguish it from traditional luxury. The second is to examine the personal values that drive these new luxury consumption values, which affect consumers’ intentions to engage with a new luxury brand.

Design/methodology/approach

Two studies were conducted. In Study 1, a conceptual framework was developed to define new luxury from the consumption value perspective, based on a comprehensive review of the traditional luxury and emerging or new luxury literature. In Study 2, the framework was further extended to include the driving sources (personal values) and the consequences (intentions to engage with a new luxury brand), which were subsequently examined with empirical model testing. The data were collected via an online survey with consumers recruited through Amazon Mechanical Turk (n = 318) and examined with exploratory factor analyses and path analyses.

Findings

The results suggest five major new luxury consumption values that help empirically define new luxury, revealing a trend shift in luxury consumption: inconspicuous consumption, self-directed pleasure, intrinsic experiential value, personal fulfillment and sustainability. Among these five values, three (intrinsic experiential value, personal fulfillment and sustainability) were the most significant factors in directly affecting customer intention to engage with a new luxury brand. The results also found five notable personal values driving new luxury consumption: achievement, benevolence, self-direction, self-esteem and ecocentrism.

Originality/value

While new luxury concepts have been explored conceptually and qualitatively in previous studies, there is a lack of empirical research that clearly defines what new luxury is and that offers testable constructs. This study’s empirical framework for new luxury expands the line of investigation into new luxury consumers, brands and products.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 31 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 December 2021

Dayu Cao, Yan Zheng, Chunnian Liu, Xiaoying Yao and Shiyue Chen

This study aims to identify and describe the relationships among different consumption values, anxiety and organic food purchase behaviour considering the moderating role…

432

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to identify and describe the relationships among different consumption values, anxiety and organic food purchase behaviour considering the moderating role of sustainable consumption attitude from the viewpoint of the theory of consumption values.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected using a structured questionnaire survey in first-tier cities in China. A total of 344 consumers of organic foods participated in the study. Structural equation modelling and hierarchical regression analysis were employed for data analysis.

Findings

The results indicated the significant association of functional value-price, emotional value, social value and epistemic value with purchase behaviour. Anxiety had a positively significant influence on functional (quality), functional (price), emotional, social, conditional and epistemic values. In addition, the results indicated that functional (price), emotional, social and epistemic values played mediating effects in the relationships between anxiety and purchase behaviour. Moreover, sustainable consumption attitude had a positive moderating effect on functional value-price and purchase behaviour.

Practical implications

The research not only provides novel and original insights for understanding organic consumption but also provides a reference for organic retailers to develop sales strategies and policymakers to formulate policies to guide organic consumption that are conducive to promoting sustainable consumption.

Originality/value

For the first time, this research attempts to explore the relationships among different consumption values, anxiety and purchase behaviour. It may improve the gap of inconsistency in attitude and behaviour in organic consumption, and provide a new perspective for the study of organic consumption.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 December 2020

Sanjida Amin and Md Touhiduzzaman Tarun

The purpose of this paper is to explore the effect of consumption values (such as functional value, emotional value and social value) on purchase intention of customers…

2404

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the effect of consumption values (such as functional value, emotional value and social value) on purchase intention of customers’ regarding green products and to examine the influence of green trust as a mediator.

Design/methodology/approach

Cross-sectional research design was considered where self-administered questionnaire was employed to collect data from the respondents. Both statistical package for social science (SPSS) and partial least square (PLS) method, a second-generation technique of structural equation modeling (SEM), were used as statistical tools for analyzing the model and for estimating the parameters.

Findings

Emotional value has paramount influence on green purchase intention whereas the other two dimensions of consumption values have insignificant impact on customers’ green purchase intention. Moreover, green trust has the most significant effect on customers’ green purchase intention and green trust showed significant mediating effect between three dimensions of consumption values and green purchase intention.

Practical implications

The findings of the current study may assist the organizations and business owners with the understanding of green consumption and business strategies designed to address the environmental issues. Marketers should emphasize on products functional benefits as well as products social and, most importantly, on emotional benefits to enhance customers’ environment-friendly behavior.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, the study is the first to measure the impact of consumption values on green buying intention with the role of green trust as a mediator in Bangladesh. The outcome demonstrates how several variables interact with each other to influence green purchase intention.

Details

Social Responsibility Journal, vol. 17 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-1117

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 31 October 2018

Cheng-Hao Steve Chen, Meng-Shan Sharon Wu, Bang Nguyen and Stacey Li

The purpose of this study is to provide insights into value creation within a newspaper consumption community, adding to current information research by demonstrating how…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to provide insights into value creation within a newspaper consumption community, adding to current information research by demonstrating how an atypical consumption community can co-create value in ways different from those identified in extant research. The upheaval of the newspaper industry’s business model and value chain in the face of digitalisation has led to significant decreases in newspaper revenue. To stay successful in the modern digital climate, it is essential for newspapers to utilise the interactive features of Web 2.0 to find new value sources. To do so, it is necessary to focus not just on tangible financial value but also symbolic value. The study supports the notion that consumers collectively co-create value through consumption community practices.

Design/methodology/approach

Through the conduction of a netnographic exploration of active consumers on the Guardian website and interviews with passive consumers, the study’s aims of understanding co-creation in digitally facilitated newspaper consumption environment were achieved.

Findings

The findings have opened up new ways in which newspapers can harness value through consumption communities as well as suggesting the future scope of research. This study indicates that newspapers foster an atypical environment for the creation of a cohesive consumption community – something that has failed to be appreciated in extant information research – because their diverse content influences the formation of multiple community pools with members who do not always share the same beliefs. In addition, the study reveals that the Guardian’s online consumption community co-creates value without strict adherence to the prescribed contingencies set out in current literature. The findings uncover new patterns in community behaviour proving value to be created not just through their co-consumption but also through individual consumption.

Originality/value

This study contributes to discussions on how communities co-create value and how this differs with different article subjects (lifestyle and political and types of participants, both active and passive).

Details

The Bottom Line, vol. 32 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0888-045X

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 69000