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Article
Publication date: 17 June 2013

Johan Bruwer, Miranda Fong and Anthony Saliba

This exploratory study aimed to examine the relationship between perceived risk, risk-reduction strategies (RRS), and the occasion-based purchase of wine, a product widely…

Abstract

Purpose

This exploratory study aimed to examine the relationship between perceived risk, risk-reduction strategies (RRS), and the occasion-based purchase of wine, a product widely regarded as representing a complex buying situation for consumers in a retail setting.

Design/methodology/approach

Data was collected in a specialty wine store in Adelaide, Australia using a self-administered questionnaire. A 22-item Perceived Risk Scale (PRS) was developed and operationalised in this study returning a Cronbach alpha coefficient of 0.717.

Findings

The highest perceived risk dimension, namely financial risk, did not differ between risk segments, while the high perceived risk segment observed more social risk than the low perceived risk segment. The high-perceived risk segment also observed more psychological risk. Information seeking was the most important RRS used across seven different wine consumption occasions. The decreasing order of importance in consumption occasions had an inverse relationship to the closeness of the relationship the wine consumers had with those with whom they may consume the wine they had purchased.

Research limitations/implications

Marketers and managers have the opportunity to target consumers mindful of their specific perceived risks, and help reduce these uncertainties through the use of individualised RRS management focused on consumers' occasion-based wine purchases.

Originality/value

This study is of value to academic researchers and wine industry practitioners alike. It contributes to the knowledge base by developing a new Perceived Risk Scale (PRS) to investigate the relationship perceived risk has on the types of RRS wine consumers use when purchasing wine for various consumption occasions.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 25 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

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Article
Publication date: 5 June 2017

David Roe and Johan Bruwer

The purpose of this paper is to examine the extent to which consumer self-concept (self-esteem) and product involvement influences the wine purchase decision at the retail…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the extent to which consumer self-concept (self-esteem) and product involvement influences the wine purchase decision at the retail level given the anticipated consumption occasion. The predictive effects of self-concept on this interaction were also explored.

Design/methodology/approach

Data collection was in the independent specialist fine wine store environment in Sydney, Australia. Central to the study was the development of a 33-item multi-dimensional fine wine involvement scale (Cronbach’s α =0.846 for 26 final items) for measuring consumers’ involvement.

Findings

Wine product involvement deepens with age but low involvement consumers perceiving risk in making the wrong product choice may well purchase fine wines for situations where self-concept is a moderating factor. In the case of low involvement wine consumers a positive association exists between situational wine choice and self-concept but no significant differences exist for self-concept across any of the consumption occasions. Age and self-concept were both confirmed as linked to levels of consumption. The findings support the notion that wine consumers aged 45 years and older are significantly more disposed to purchase fine wine products.

Practical implications

For self-concept to be relevant to purchase it follows that the wine consumption occasion must be conspicuous.

Originality/value

This study is the first to examine the extent to which consumer self-concept and product involvement influences the wine purchase decision at the retail level given the anticipated consumption occasion.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 119 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 11 November 2014

Martin Hirche and Johan Bruwer

The purpose of this study is to measure the product involvement of wine buyers and to examine relationships with anticipated consumption situations, places and occasions

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to measure the product involvement of wine buyers and to examine relationships with anticipated consumption situations, places and occasions combined with the buyer’s importance of various extrinsic product attributes.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey is conducted with 147 wine buyers using structured self-administered questionnaires in a central city retail location in Australia.

Findings

There are no significant relationships between consumers’ involvement with wine products and what occasion or constellation of persons is anticipated when purchasing wine in a retail store. From a consumption situation perspective, both high- and low-involved buyers primarily anticipate consuming their wine together with other persons, mainly with food. High-involved wine consumers tend to consume their wine alone compared to low-involved consumers who are more likely to buy wine for other persons than for themselves. Regarding the product attributes that play an important role in retailing, this study finds that the importance of grape variety, the origin of the wine, the brand, the vintage, awards/medals and the product design increases with growing involvement in wine. The age of the buyer/consumer and the envisaged consumption occasion also affect the importance of various product attributes. We also find that wine buyers would spend on average over $15 more per unit when the wine is not bought for their personal consumption (e.g. gift).

Originality/value

This study is of value to academic researchers, the wine industry in general and wine retailers in specific as it offers new insights on the role of product involvement and anticipated consumption situations when buying a product and their effects on the importance of product attributes.

Details

International Journal of Wine Business Research, vol. 26 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1062

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1997

John Hall, Michael Shaw and Isobel Doole

This paper investigates the influence of ethnologically based cultural factors on the motives and occasions for wine consumption both in Australia and overseas. As the…

Abstract

This paper investigates the influence of ethnologically based cultural factors on the motives and occasions for wine consumption both in Australia and overseas. As the international market for wine expands, global marketers have begun searching for new ways to define trans‐national segments. In particular, the success of Australian wines in the UK has provided a strong base for expansion into the competitive European market One key decision must involve what degree of differentiation the marketing program for each country will contain. Because many marketing theorists see ethnic or cultural background as one of the major underlying determinants of consumer behaviour this decision becomes quite critical. Others argue that consumption of wine is not culturally dependent but based on either a common set of motivations or is determined solely by the occasion in which wine will be consumed. To study this hypothesis a questionnaire was administered to approximately 500 respondents from a variety of Australian and European backgrounds. A single cross‐sectional design was employed. Respondents were primarily selected using a random sampling procedure with quotas boosted for some cultural groups by a convenience sampling process. The four chosen for analysis were Italian, Greek, German and Australian. It was found using an occasion‐based segmentation approach that there were significant differences between wine consumers of different cultural backgrounds. It is concluded that cultural factors do impact on the consumption process of wine and should be considered in any proposals for trans‐national segmentation strategies. However it is also shown that there are some motivational factors that are not culturally dependent. These factors are prime reasons for general wine consumption behaviour and could be used if an undifferentiated global! approach to wine segmentation is the most efficient for the marketer.

Details

International Journal of Wine Marketing, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-7541

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Article
Publication date: 10 June 2014

Josias A. Engelbrecht, Frikkie Herbst and Johan Bruwer

This purpose of the study was to examine the relevance of the presence of geographical information, specifically the certification of region of origin (ROO) on the wine…

Abstract

Purpose

This purpose of the study was to examine the relevance of the presence of geographical information, specifically the certification of region of origin (ROO) on the wine label, in the consumer’s wine purchase decision. In addition, the research investigated how the relevance of ROO varies across demographic and behavioural market segments.

Design/methodology/approach

The data gathered via an online questionnaire from 434 South African wine consumers were analysed by employing both descriptive and inferential statistical methods.

Findings

The ROO of wine plays a secondary role in influencing consumers when faced with a purchasing decision on its own. However, as part of the composite regional variable, namely, grape variety, region and wine style, it plays a major role in influencing consumers. The specific wine grape variety emerged as the most important factor influencing consumers. It was also found that consumers with a high involvement and interest in wine assign a higher degree of relevance to certification of origin of wine than consumers with a low involvement.

Practical implications

Wine producers should strive to create a “lighthouse” identity in the minds of consumers. This can only be achieved if most, if not all, the wine producers in a specific geographical area consistently and authentically communicate the same message and offer products with a lighthouse identity to wine consumers.

Originality/value

This is the first study that examines the impact of ROO as an information cue on consumers’ wine purchase decision-making in South Africa. It is of value to academic researchers, wine marketing professionals and generic marketing organisations such as wine route organisations.

Details

International Journal of Wine Business Research, vol. 26 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1062

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 28 April 2014

Ana Patrícia Silva, Isabel Figueiredo, Tim Hogg and Miguel Sottomayor

The aim of this study is to identify perceptions, attitudes and behavior of young adults concerning wine consumption, using the “theory of planned behavior” as a…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this study is to identify perceptions, attitudes and behavior of young adults concerning wine consumption, using the “theory of planned behavior” as a theoretical framework.

Design/methodology/approach

The aim of this study is to identify perceptions, attitudes and behavior of young adults concerning wine consumption, using the “theory of planned behavior” as a theoretical framework.

Findings

The major findings are that attitudes and subjective norms are, apparently, the components with most influence on behavior of young people in relation to wine consumption. For the consumers group, attitudes seem to be the most crucial component, especially the “interest in alcohol”. They drink it in special occasions for sociability and to disinhibit. Regarding the non-consumers group, the main attitude is “dislike taste”. Also the subjective norms, are very present, especially parents, society, friends and publicity, in consumers group. The non-consumers have the perception of greater parental induction to not consume wine. No significant differences were found between gender or educational system.

Research limitations/implications

Concerning the results, a limited, convenience sample, was employed and this is assumedly an exploratory study. Therefore the results cannot be considered to represent a broad section of the groups studied. Still sample related, only Portuguese young adults students were studied.

Social implications

This research can contribute not only for the knowledge relating to Portugal as a wine consuming environment but also to the general area of attitudes and perceptions of young people towards moderate wine consumption. As today young adults, novice or potential wine consumers will be the next generation of wine consumers, it can be beneficial for wine marketers to focus on this target population aiming at exploring further their engagement with wine.

Originality/value

This research has an originally approach to wine consumption by young adults once it focus and explore the non-problematic behavior of young adults about wine consumption. The results of this study can contribute to the development of targeted advertising and publicity of the wine industry, in order to promote moderate wine consumption among young adults.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 116 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 18 November 2019

Wang Yabin and Jiagui Li

The purpose of this paper is to explore China’s online wine market segmentation on the basis of the wine-related lifestyle (WRL). Moreover, this study can provide further…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore China’s online wine market segmentation on the basis of the wine-related lifestyle (WRL). Moreover, this study can provide further understanding and reference about China’s wine market segmentation research, which is limited at present. This work can be helpful for those who want to do further research in the Chinese wine market. It is good for wine importers wanting to import wine to China to understand the Chinese wine consumers.

Design/methodology/approach

Survey data were obtained from a sample of 3,369 participants through cooperation between the College of Enology and the Yesmywine.com website. Questionnaire items included gender, age, area distribution, unit price, bottles consumed, drinking frequency, drinking time, wine-related knowledge, etc. Combined with the influence factors of the WRL, a structural equation model was developed. The data analysis, particularly employing principal component analysis, enabled the identification of five market segments.

Findings

Five distinct segments were identified within the wine market and designated as follows: wine official consumption type enthusiastic fancier; enjoyment consumption; fashionable consumption; and new, young wine drinkers.

Research limitations/implications

The research data were derived from Yesmywine, one of the largest online wine sale platforms. However, the impact of yesmywine is much smaller compared with Tmall and Taobao and Jingdong. In this paper, we can see that WRL is increasingly becoming a part of Chinese people’s daily lives, especially for the enthusiastic and fancier wine consumers, which is the official type of wine consumer. Next, an analysis of time series under the data of the near future years should be conducted to find the online wine segmentation market variation trend. Moreover, it is important to conduct cross-culture comparison between the Chinese and Australians. Brand positioning can be improved by better understanding China’s online wine market segmentation.

Practical implications

WRL segmentation is valuable for the wine importers and producers in west France, Italian, Germany and so on, as they want to develop China’s wine market and understand the mindset of Chinese wine consumers. The wine importers in China should focus more on consumers that enjoy wine along with newer and younger wine drinkers.

Originality/value

This paper analyzes a large sample (3,369) and therefore is useful for understanding online wine market segmentation and wine consumption behavior in China owing to China’s limited wine market segmentation literature. This paper is the first to use WRL tool to segment China’s online wine market. Moreover, the research data have reference value for those who want to learn more about China’s online wine market, as yesmywine is one of the largest online wine-sale platforms. It also gives some managerial implications for wineries and wine marketers that will be helpful to wine companies in understanding the emerging Chinese wine market and in enacting wine marketing strategies more effectively.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 122 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 13 March 2017

Naomi Verdonk, John Wilkinson, Julie Culbert, Renata Ristic, Karma Pearce and Kerry Wilkinson

This paper aims to provide further insight into factors influencing Australian consumers’ purchasing preferences for sparkling wine, including champagne.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to provide further insight into factors influencing Australian consumers’ purchasing preferences for sparkling wine, including champagne.

Design/methodology/approach

Focus groups were conducted and thematic analysis was undertaken to identify factors influencing sparkling wine consumers’ purchasing preferences.

Findings

Personal taste was found to influence choice of a sparkling wine rather than another type of beverage, and selection of a particular style and brand of sparkling wine. Country or region of origin was found to be important, often linked to the product being champagne. Brand image, reputation and symbolism were found to influence purchase decisions (sometimes linked to consumption occasion), especially for purchases of gifts. Advice, recommendations and expert reviews, and consumption occasion also were found to influence purchase decisions. Price was found to influence style and brand of sparkling wine purchased. A high price was found to be a barrier for some participants, while other participants were found to avoid sparkling wines priced below some particular level. Thematic analysis enabled development of a preliminary model of purchasing preferences.

Research limitations/implications

Being exploratory in nature, findings cannot be generalised. Further studies are required to confirm the preliminary model and to evaluate the validity and significance of proposed relationships.

Practical implications

Findings suggest a producer could benefit from marketing a range of sparkling wines to cater to different tastes, occasions and gift purchases. Findings also confirm the importance of marketers pursuing opportunities to obtain and promote favourable expert reviews for their sparkling wines, and of identifying and promoting regional distinctiveness.

Originality/value

The first comprehensive model of sparkling wine consumers’ purchasing preferences has been developed. Empirical testing would enable refinement and enhance understanding.

Details

International Journal of Wine Business Research, vol. 29 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1062

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 2 February 2015

Cheila Almeida, Themistoklis Altintzoglou, Henrique Cabral and Sofia Vaz

Portugal is a country with one of the highest seafood consumption per capita in the world. The purpose of this paper is to understand the Portuguese knowledge and…

Abstract

Purpose

Portugal is a country with one of the highest seafood consumption per capita in the world. The purpose of this paper is to understand the Portuguese knowledge and attitudes towards seafood and relate it to consumers’ environmental conscious.

Design/methodology/approach

Using an internet-based survey the authors investigated the relation of socio-demographic variables to consumption frequency and how knowledge about seafood is associated with interest in different information when purchasing seafood products.

Findings

Results demonstrate consumption of a high diversity of species. Tuna and cod are the top species related to convenience and food traditions. There is a preference to consume seafood mostly at home and prepared grilled. Differences between higher and lower knowledgeable consumers’ related to seafood, show that the first ones have a more diversified use of species and high prevalence of small pelagic fish.

Research limitations/implications

The findings are influenced by the sample obtained, which over-represents well-educated and higher income people. Moreover the self-reported consumption can be biased by individuals own perceptions and different seafood products. Better estimations of consumption frequency could result from asking more detailed information, as such as by species or meal occasions.

Practical implications

Portuguese consumers have high knowledge about seafood but it is not necessarily related to sustainable choices. To help in sustainable seafood choices it might be more effective to promote existing habits based on Portuguese traditions that still are good alternatives for the marine environment.

Originality/value

A higher consumer’s knowledge does not necessarily mean more sustainability.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 117 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2019

Cristina Calvo-Porral and Jean-Pierre Levy-Mangin

Situational factors influence food and drink consumption, being how, when and where, not fully researched. In this context, the purpose of this paper is to address the…

Abstract

Purpose

Situational factors influence food and drink consumption, being how, when and where, not fully researched. In this context, the purpose of this paper is to address the influence of “where” in alcoholic beverage consumption. That is, the authors examine the influence of the place of consumption, comparing consumer behaviour at home and at hostelry outlets.

Design/methodology/approach

For this purpose, beer was selected as the alcoholic beverage category. Then, a conceptual model of consumer behaviour was proposed and empirically tested through multi-group structural equation modelling (SEM) on a sample of 525 beer consumers (home consumers=209 and hostelry consumers=316.

Findings

The findings show that the place of consumption influences alcoholic beverage consumer behaviour. While home consumers demand value for money, hostelry consumers seek for product perceived quality.

Practical implications

This research suggests the applicability of situational factors to the beverages market, providing a starting point for situational segmentation.

Originality/value

The authors’ major contribution is the empirical examination into how alcoholic beverage consumption behaviour is situational dependent.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 121 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

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