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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2005

Ravi Pappu, Pascale G. Quester and Ray W. Cooksey

The present research aims to improve the measurement of consumer‐based brand equity. Current measurement of consumer‐based brand equity suffers from limitations…

Abstract

Purpose

The present research aims to improve the measurement of consumer‐based brand equity. Current measurement of consumer‐based brand equity suffers from limitations, including: a lack of distinction between the dimensions brand awareness and brand associations, the use of non‐discriminant indicators in the measurement scales and of student samples.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on the recommendations of extant research, the scale constructed to measure consumer‐based brand equity in this study included brand personality measures. Brand associations were measured using a different set of items. Unlike many of the previous studies that had used student samples, the present study used a sample of actual consumers from an Australian state capital city. Confirmatory factor analysis employing structural equations modelling was used to measure consumer‐based brand equity in two product categories and across six brands.

Findings

Results support the hypothesised four‐dimension model of consumer‐based brand equity across two product categories and six brands. Brand awareness and brand associations were found to be two distinct dimensions of brand equity as conceptualised in the marketing literature. The present study contributes to the understanding of consumer‐based brand equity measurement by examining the dimensionality of this construct.

Originality/value

The principal contribution of the present research is that it provides empirical evidence of the multidimensionality of consumer‐based brand equity, supporting Aaker's and Keller's conceptualisation of brand equity. The present research also enriched consumer‐based brand equity measurement by incorporating the brand personality measures, as recommended by previous researchers. While earlier studies were conducted using US and Korean samples, the present study also used a sample of Australian consumers.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2006

Ravi Pappu, Pascale G. Quester and Ray W. Cooksey

The objective of the present research is to examine the impact of the country of origin of a brand on its consumer‐based equity.

Abstract

Purpose

The objective of the present research is to examine the impact of the country of origin of a brand on its consumer‐based equity.

Design/methodology/approach

Brand equity was conceptualized in this paper as a combination of brand awareness, brand associations, perceived quality and attitudinal brand loyalty. A doubly multivariate design was incorporated in a structured questionnaire to collect data via mall intercepts in an Australian capital city.

Findings

Multivariate analysis of variance of the data indicated that consumer‐based brand equity varied according to the country of origin of the brand and product category. This impact of country of origin on brand equity occurred where consumers perceived substantive differences between the countries in terms of their product category‐country associations.

Research limitations/implications

An important direction for future research would be to examine how the consumer‐based equity of a brand would be affected, if the country of origin were changed from a country with weaker association with the product category to a country with strong association with the product category. The results would be useful to MNCs contemplating international manufacturing.

Practical implications

Marketing managers operating in the international context must identify the sources of brand equity, and understand the importance of incorporating country of origin into their brand equity measurement. Further, the results suggest that, when a brand offers a variety of product categories, brand managers should monitor and track the brand's consumer‐based equity for each product category.

Originality/value

The present study is one of the first to empirically examine and confirm the impact of country of origin on the consumer‐based equity of a brand.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 40 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 31 August 2012

Gopal Das, Biplab Datta and Kalyan Kumar Guin

The purpose of this paper is to explore the impact of retailer personality on consumer‐based retailer equity.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the impact of retailer personality on consumer‐based retailer equity.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors developed a retailer personality scale and find its impact on consumer‐based retailer equity by adopting the scale developed by Pappu and Quester. A mall‐intercept survey was undertaken using a systematic sampling of department store shoppers of age 18 years and above in a metropolitan city, Kolkata, India. The questionnaire was used to collect data from seven department retail brands. The impact of each retailer personality dimension on each consumer‐based retailer equity dimension was explored, using structural equation modeling.

Findings

The study proposed a five‐dimensional scale to measure department store personality. Results indicated that the three dimensions of store personality, namely sophistication, dependability and empathy, have significant positive impact on each consumer‐based retailer equity dimension except one (empathy→retailer loyalty). The remaining two dimensions of retailer personality, namely authenticity and vibrancy, have no impact on each consumer‐based retailer dimension.

Originality/value

The paper is the first to propose a scale for measuring department store personality and to explore the link between retailer personality and consumer‐based retailer equity.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 24 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

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Article
Publication date: 11 May 2015

George Christodoulides, John W. Cadogan and Cleopatra Veloutsou

The purpose of this paper is to examine the performance of Aaker’s dominant conceptualization of consumer-based brand equity (brand awareness, brand associations…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the performance of Aaker’s dominant conceptualization of consumer-based brand equity (brand awareness, brand associations, perceived quality and brand loyalty) in a multi-national and multi-sector European context and highlights important lessons vis-à-vis the measurement of brand assets across countries.

Design/methodology/approach

Cross-category data was collected through a survey over a period of two months from a representative sample of consumers in three European countries (n=1,829), the UK (n=605), Germany (n=600) and Greece (n=624).

Findings

The findings suggest that Aaker’s dimensions of consumer-based brand equity cannot be clearly separated. More specifically the dimensions of brand awareness, brand associations and brand loyalty could not be always clearly discriminated in all national contexts.

Originality/value

The paper contributes to the limited amount of cross-national research on brand equity by assessing the most widely used conceptualization of consumer-based brand equity. Contrary to previous research, this study has used data from real consumers who evaluated a range of brands across product categories (including goods, services and internet).

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 32 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

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Article
Publication date: 22 February 2013

Sadia Jahanzeb, Tasneem Fatima and Muhammad Mohsin Butt

The aim of this study is to test a holistic model that investigates the direct influence of service quality on building consumer based brand equity, along with the…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this study is to test a holistic model that investigates the direct influence of service quality on building consumer based brand equity, along with the mediating role of corporate credibility and perceived value.

Design/methodology/approach

A self‐administrated questionnaire was used to collect data from the customers of local and foreign banks in the Islamabad and Rawalpindi regions of Pakistan. The hypothesized relationships were tested using structural equation modeling procedure.

Findings

The results suggest that perceived value and corporate credibility fully mediate the relationship between perceived service quality and consumer based brand equity.

Practical implications

This study is managerially important for two reasons. First, it will help managers to focus on a more integrated and holistic approach in building consumer based brand equity of their service firms. Second, it will provide clear guidelines for managers regarding how investments in different aspects of important marketing constructs can influence consumer preferential relations with a brand.

Originality/value

This research is probably the first to investigate a holistic model that explores the causal relationships among service quality, perceived value, corporate credibility and consumer based brand equity of service organizations.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 31 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

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Book part
Publication date: 11 June 2009

Quan Tran and Carmen Cox

In the literature on product branding, significant attention is given to brand equity in the consumer context, but relatively little attention is paid to the application…

Abstract

In the literature on product branding, significant attention is given to brand equity in the consumer context, but relatively little attention is paid to the application of the concept in the business-to-business (B2B) context. Even less research exists on the role of brand equity in the retailing context. Retailers are often seen as irrelevant to the source of brand value, resulting in manufacturers not targeting retailers to help them build stronger brands. Potential occurs, therefore, for some channel conflict to exist between manufacturers and retailers. On the one hand, retailers tend to focus on building their own, private brands to differentiate themselves from other retail competitors and to increase their power in relation to manufacturer brands. At the same time, most retailers still need to create a good image in the consumer marketplace by selling famous, manufacturer-branded products. In other words, retailers often have to sell famous brands even if they would prefer to sell other brands including their own. Manufacturers tend to focus their brand-building efforts on the consumer market to entice consumers to insist that retailers stock their brands, rather than placing any real emphasis on building a strong and positive brand relationship with the retailer directly.

Details

Business-To-Business Brand Management: Theory, Research and Executivecase Study Exercises
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-671-3

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Article
Publication date: 14 June 2011

Rajat Roy and Ryan Chau

The purpose of this research is to explore how a successful global and a local brand may compete side by side in an existing market place based on consumer‐based brand

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research is to explore how a successful global and a local brand may compete side by side in an existing market place based on consumer‐based brand equity and consumers' status‐seeking motivation for purchasing a global versus local brand.

Design/methodology/approach

The data for this research were collected through a self‐administered survey from students in a large Western Australian university.

Findings

The results show that a global brand is generally preferred in terms of all the dimensions of consumer‐based brand equity over a local brand. However, a significant interaction emerged between the type of brand and high versus low status‐seeking motivation consumers. A global brand is strongly favoured in terms of awareness, perceived quality and overall brand equity by high status seekers while a local brand seems to enjoy loyalty and overall brand equity among low status seekers. A global brand is also clearly preferred over a local brand along all dimensions of consumer‐based brand equity amongst high status‐seeking consumers. Further, a local brand is clearly preferred in terms of consumer‐based brand equity over the global brand by Australians whereas the global brand remains a clear favourite with non‐Australians.

Research limitations/implications

Findings may not generalize beyond Australian sample and the product category.

Originality/value

This empirical research explores how global and local brands may compete with each other based on their strengths. This research also addresses a theoretical gap identified by Yoo and Donthu.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 23 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

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Article
Publication date: 4 May 2012

Sajjad Ahmad and Muhammad Mohsin Butt

This research attempts to empirically expand the Aaker's consumer based brand equity model in hybrid business firms by incorporating after sales service as a new…

Abstract

Purpose

This research attempts to empirically expand the Aaker's consumer based brand equity model in hybrid business firms by incorporating after sales service as a new dimension. Exploring and understanding the drivers of consumer based brand equity in a hybrid business context will help in building industry specific competitive barriers and generating brand wealth.

Design/methodology/approach

The data were collected from Pakistani adults using a structured questionnaire based on established scales. Convenience sampling was used to gather data from 205 respondents across the major cities of Pakistan. To test the proposed research model the data were analyzed using confirmatory factor analysis.

Findings

The results support the proposed five‐factor model of consumer based brand equity for the automotive industry. The results support the notion that after sales service is related but is a separate dimension of consumer based brand equity in the automotive sector.

Research limitations/implications

This proposed CBBE model was tested in the automotive sector of Pakistan. However, the automotive industry is special in the sense that it builds brands at dual level. This study only investigates consumer based brand equity at marque level. Future studies can expand on this work by investigating consumer based brand equity both at marque and model levels.

Practical implications

The establishment of after sale services as a separate but independent dimension of consumer based brand equity for the hybrid business organizations provides a fresh reminder regarding the possibilities of new sources for building brand equity. Managers can focus on delivering excellent after sale services to build and enhance the equity of their brands in hybrid business organizations.

Originality/value

This study expands Aaker's brand equity model by empirically establishing after sales service as a fifth dimension for the firms operating on hybrid business model.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 30 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

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Article
Publication date: 19 February 2020

Kian Yeik Koay, Derek Lai Teik Ong, Kim Leng Khoo and Hui Jing Yeoh

The purpose of this research is to investigate the influence of perceived social media marketing activities on consumer-based brand equity, mainly predicated on the S-O-R…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research is to investigate the influence of perceived social media marketing activities on consumer-based brand equity, mainly predicated on the S-O-R model. Furthermore, brand experience is tested as a mediator of the relationship between perceived social media marketing activities and consumer-based brand equity, whereas co-creation behaviour is also examined as a moderator on the relationship between perceived social media marketing activities and brand experience.

Design/methodology/approach

A structured survey questionnaire was developed and distributed to social media users from a large private university in Malaysia. A total of 253 valid responses were obtained. Hypotheses were tested employing partial least squares structural equation modelling (PLS-SEM).

Findings

The results indicated that perceived social media marketing activities have a significant positive influence on consumer-based brand equity. In addition, brand experience mediates the relationship between perceived social media marketing activities and consumer-based brand equity. Surprisingly, co-creation behaviour was found to have no moderating effect on the relationship between perceived social media marketing activities and brand experience. Furthermore, using the PROCESS macro, we found that the indirect effect of perceived social media marketing activities on consumer-based brand equity through brand experience is not moderated by co-creation behaviour.

Originality/value

This research further extended the current knowledge by demonstrating that the influence of perceived social media marketing activities on consumer-based brand equity is mediated by brand experience. Also, this research utilised the strength of PLS–SEM in dealing with higher-order constructs, allowing us to develop and test a parsimonious model that is useful for practitioners.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 33 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

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Article
Publication date: 13 July 2015

Rory Mulcahy, Rebekah Russell-Bennett and Sharyn Rundle-Thiele

This paper aims to understand how experiential value can generate awareness, image, perceived quality and loyalty to the moderate drinking brand. Electronic games are…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to understand how experiential value can generate awareness, image, perceived quality and loyalty to the moderate drinking brand. Electronic games are increasingly used by social marketers in an attempt to support target audiences uptake of social behaviours. However, little is known of the value this creates for target audiences and its impact on the uptake of a social behaviour brand.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey of male adolescents (n = 137) was conducted to test proposed relationships between experiential value and consumer-based brand equity dimensions. The research tested the game “Don’t Turn a Night Out into a Nightmare” that was developed by the Australian Federal Government as part of a social marketing campaign. Data were analysed using linear regression and MANCOVA.

Findings

The findings indicate that there are significant relationships between consumer-based brand equity dimensions for the social behaviour brand of moderate drinking, indicating relevance of a commercial marketing theory for social marketing. Furthermore, findings show that different combinations of experiential value dimensions have an impact on different components of consumer-based brand equity. These findings indicate that when social marketers are developing electronic games, they must create different combinations of value in game play to achieve awareness, positive image, high perceived quality and, ultimately, loyalty to a behaviour.

Practical implications

Social marketers seeking to use electronic games to influence the uptake of behaviour brands such as moderate drinking must provide a more complete value package.

Originality/value

This paper is the first to examine how experiential value can influence the creation of brand equity for a social behaviour brand.

Details

Journal of Social Marketing, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-6763

Keywords

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