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Article
Publication date: 23 August 2011

Nizar Souiden, Frank Pons and Marie‐Eve Mayrand

The pupose of this paper is to investigate consumers' behavior in emerging countries. In particular, it simultaneously assesses the effects of country image and

Abstract

Purpose

The pupose of this paper is to investigate consumers' behavior in emerging countries. In particular, it simultaneously assesses the effects of country image and country‐of‐origin's image on consumers' uncertainty, aspiration and purchasing intention of high‐tech products.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on a sample of 479 Chinese consumers, structural equation modeling was used to test the hypothesized relationships.

Findings

Results show that compared to country‐of‐origin, country's image is a more effective tool in reducing consumers' uncertainty and increasing their aspiration to purchase high technology products. Contrary to country's image, however, country‐of‐origin's image plays a considerable role in influencing the product image.

Research limitations/implications

The major role of a country‐of‐origin is to influence product image while that of country's image is to increase consumers' aspiration to acquire its product and diminish their uncertainty and hesitation about buying the product. In other words, the image of a product is much more prone to the effect of country‐of‐origin's image than country's image.

Practical implications

Marketers should understand that consumers in emerging countries are ambivalent when they consider the purchase of complex products. On the one hand, highlighting the country image can contribute in alleviating consumers' uncertainty and increasing their aspiration to purchase sophisticated and complex products. On the other hand, promoting the country‐of‐origin's image can prove an effective means to improve product image in emerging markets.

Originality/value

Most of the previous studies have focused on one of the two concepts (i.e. country's image or country‐of‐origin), interchangeably used both of them, and relatively ignored their simultaneous impact on consumer behavior. The present study has tried to address this shortfall through simultaneously studying their influences on product image and consumer purchase intention; and highlighting their differential impacts.

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Article
Publication date: 23 August 2011

Richard C. Leventhal

Abstract

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 20 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

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Article
Publication date: 2 September 2016

Jérôme Boutang and Michel De Lara

In a modern world increasingly perceived as uncertain, the mere purchase of a household cleaning product, or a seemingly harmless bottle of milk, conveys interrogations…

Abstract

Purpose

In a modern world increasingly perceived as uncertain, the mere purchase of a household cleaning product, or a seemingly harmless bottle of milk, conveys interrogations about potential hazards, from environmental to health impacts. The main purpose of this paper is to suggest that risk could be considered as one of the major dimensions of choice for a wide range of concerns and markets, alongside aspiration/satisfaction, and tackled efficiently by mobilizing the recent findings of cognitive sciences, neurosciences and evolutionary psychology. It is felt that consumer research could benefit more widely from psychological and evolutionary-grounded risk theories.

Design/methodology/approach

In this study, some 50 years of marketing management literature, as well as risk-specialized literature, was examined in an attempt to get a grasp of how risk is handled by consumer sciences and of whether they make some use of the most recent academic works on mental biases, non-mainstream decision-making processes or evolutionary roots of behavior. We then tested and formulated several hypotheses regarding risk profiles and preferences in the sector of insurance, by participating in an Axa Research Fund–Paris School of Economics research project.

Findings

It is suggested that consumer profiles could be enriched by risk-taking attitudes, that risk could be part of the “reason why” of brand positioning, and that brand, as well as public policy communication, could benefit from a targeted use of risk perception biases.

Originality/value

This paper proposes to apply evolutionary-based psychological concepts to build perceptual maps describing people and consumers on both aspiration and risk attitude axis, and to design communication tools according to psychological research on message framing and biases. Such an approach mobilizes not only the recent findings of cognitive sciences and neurosciences but also the understanding of the roots of risk attitudes and perception. Those maps and framing could probably be applied to many sectors, markets and public issues, from commodities to personal products and services (food, luxury goods, electronics, financial products, tourism, design or insurance).

Details

Journal of Centrum Cathedra, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1851-6599

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2000

Rajiv Vaidyanathan, Praveen Aggarwal, Donald E. Stem, Darrel D. Muehling and U.N. Umesh

While there has been much debate in the reference pricing literature on the most appropriate conceptualization of internal reference price used by consumers in evaluating…

Abstract

While there has been much debate in the reference pricing literature on the most appropriate conceptualization of internal reference price used by consumers in evaluating deals, the question of whether consumers may use different internal reference prices at different stages of the purchase process has not been addressed. In this article, we hypothesize that consumers may use one type of internal reference price to form their deal attitude and another to determine their purchase intentions. We also show that different dimensions of internal reference price are used to determine deal attitude and purchase intention and that price uncertainty moderates the relationship between these internal reference prices and deal evaluation.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

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Abstract

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Review of Marketing Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-726-1

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2004

Simone Müller

The German wine law has been made responsible as one of the reasons for the critical market position of German wines inside and outside Germany. As a consequence, a new…

Abstract

The German wine law has been made responsible as one of the reasons for the critical market position of German wines inside and outside Germany. As a consequence, a new wine law (the profile wine concept) has been introduced in year 2000. As consumers are increasingly looking for variety and change the wine denomination becomes a critical purchasing criterion beside bottle and brand design. The main function of a wine law is to reduce the perceived purchasing uncertainty of consumers. We analyse the factors that determine the degree of consumer uncertainty when buying wine. This uncertainty can be reduced by the information economics mechanism of signalling. We derive signalling requirements that an efficient wine law should fulfill. Subsequently we analyse how the former German wine law and the new profile wine concept comply with these requirements by analysing their effects on three distinctive consumer groups within the concept of the triangle of goods characteristics. We conclude by opposing governmental regulation on the wine market with possible self regulation possibilities within the industry.

Details

International Journal of Wine Marketing, vol. 16 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-7541

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 1986

Vasilis Karapostolis

On a general theoretical level, Greece can be classified as a semi‐peripheral country, in the sense that, although in economic, technological and political terms it has…

Abstract

On a general theoretical level, Greece can be classified as a semi‐peripheral country, in the sense that, although in economic, technological and political terms it has historically been dependent on the countries of the Western industrial centre, it has, in the years since the end of World War II, experienced an externally oriented industrialisation, based on exports of agricultural and light industrial products, as well as the steady expansion of its internal market. In other words, the overall context of consumption activities is not that of the peripheral countries of Africa, Asia or certain cases in Latin America, where dependency links are much more direct and decisive for determining development perspectives.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 13 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2003

Georgios I. Zekos

Aim of the present monograph is the economic analysis of the role of MNEs regarding globalisation and digital economy and in parallel there is a reference and examination…

Abstract

Aim of the present monograph is the economic analysis of the role of MNEs regarding globalisation and digital economy and in parallel there is a reference and examination of some legal aspects concerning MNEs, cyberspace and e‐commerce as the means of expression of the digital economy. The whole effort of the author is focused on the examination of various aspects of MNEs and their impact upon globalisation and vice versa and how and if we are moving towards a global digital economy.

Details

Managerial Law, vol. 45 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

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Article
Publication date: 27 March 2019

Madhubalan Viswanathan and Arun Sreekumar

The purpose of this paper is to provide a perspective on consumers and technology in a changing world using insights gained from subsistence marketplaces. Consumers in a…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a perspective on consumers and technology in a changing world using insights gained from subsistence marketplaces. Consumers in a changing world are on different parts of the economic spectrum and are also reflected in contexts of poverty that is termed subsistence marketplaces. “Data” comes from pioneering the subsistence marketplaces stream of research, education and social enterprise.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors study the intersection of poverty and marketplaces, beginning at the micro-level, and take a bottom-up approach to deriving implications.

Findings

The authors cover both aspects – what micro-level insights about thinking, feeling and coping mean for technology perceptions and usage in general and what specific insights are derived for designing and implementing solutions that have bearing on the use of technology. In the course of all endeavors in research, education and social enterprise, technology, particularly information and communications technology, has been central.

Research limitations/implications

The authors discuss implications for research at the confluence of a variety of uncertainties inherent in the context of subsistence marketplaces, in environmental issues and climate change and in the nature and speed of technological change and progress.

Practical implications

In this paper, the authors discuss what subsistence marketplaces mean for consumers and technology in a changing world, lessons learned for the design and development of technological solutions, technological innovation from subsistence marketplaces and a broader discussion of the importance of bottom-up approaches to the intersection of subsistence marketplaces and technological solutions.

Originality/value

The authors use insights developed from pioneering the arena of subsistence marketplaces and creating synergies between research, education and social enterprise.

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1990

Gordon Wills, Sherril H. Kennedy, John Cheese and Angela Rushton

To achieve a full understanding of the role ofmarketing from plan to profit requires a knowledgeof the basic building blocks. This textbookintroduces the key concepts in…

Abstract

To achieve a full understanding of the role of marketing from plan to profit requires a knowledge of the basic building blocks. This textbook introduces the key concepts in the art or science of marketing to practising managers. Understanding your customers and consumers, the 4 Ps (Product, Place, Price and Promotion) provides the basic tools for effective marketing. Deploying your resources and informing your managerial decision making is dealt with in Unit VII introducing marketing intelligence, competition, budgeting and organisational issues. The logical conclusion of this effort is achieving sales and the particular techniques involved are explored in the final section.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 28 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

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