Search results

1 – 10 of over 38000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 3 March 2016

Saikat Banerjee

The relationship between brand personality and consumer personality has become a researched issue in recent years. It is viewed that marketers start the dialogue with…

Abstract

Purpose

The relationship between brand personality and consumer personality has become a researched issue in recent years. It is viewed that marketers start the dialogue with consumers through personality route by building brand personality in line with consumers’ own personality traits. Moreover, in the midst of stiff competition, role of corporate personality, as a component of corporate identity, has been considered instrumental behind the success of the organization. As a result, there might be a possibility that other than his/her own personality traits, a consumer’s brand preference may be influenced by both brand personality and corporate personality of the said brand marketer. So, the predictive roles of individual personality, brand personality and corporate personality on consumer brand preference formation need to be empirically investigated so that the same may be addressed strategically. However, as per knowledge of the researcher, no empirical study has been made to investigate the predictive role of consumer personality, brand personality and corporate personality on brand preference. In this back drop, to the best of our knowledge, this study is the first attempt to fill this research gap by investigating firstly, the direct effects of individual personality of consumer, brand personality and corporate personality on consumer brand preference and secondly the impact of interaction effects of those variables on brand preference in the context of the emerging economies.

Design/methodology/approach

This study includes Indian four-wheeler passenger car market as the focal point of the study. As the product category is predominantly linked with symbolic benefits to the consumers, this target segment may be motivated to express their personality through the brands they prefer. As a result it may be an appropriate sector to study the influence of individual, brand and corporate personality behind brand preference. In this study, we have used an anonymous self-administered structured questionnaire. Part A captured respondent’s brand preference. Part B used The Big Five Model personality scale. Part C used the ‘Brand Personality Scale’ proposed by Aaker (1997) as a measure of brand personality. Part D comprised ‘Corporate Personality Scale’ developed by Davies et al. (2001). Part E recorded demographic data, including age, income, educational qualification and occupation. For Part B, C and D, Respondents were asked to rate each of the dimensions, using a five-point Likert scale, ranging from 5=Most descriptive to 1=Least Descriptive. The validity of the theoretical model is tested through Confirmatory Factor Analysis (CFA). In the first stage, main effects of the proposed model are tested. In the next stage, we have tested interaction effects of constructs on band preference. To test the hypotheses multiple regression method has been used.

Findings

The result of main effects shows that individual and brand personality has significant impact on brand preference for the considered brand by the consumers. This implies that at the time of brand preference, consumers give due importance to individual personality and personality of the considered brand of SUV. A strong and clear brand personality indicates a favorable view about the brand. Further, the result shows at the time of buying decision, personalities of both product and corporate brand are influencing their preferences. Here, consumers might be making strong association between corporate and brand personalities. In addition, interaction effects among individual, brand and corporate personality are also significant. One may view from the result that consumers do not encourage compartmentalize thinking at the time of brand choice. In place of considering his/her own personality and brand and corporate personality as a standalone entity, they think in totality and interaction effects have significant influence on their brand preference.

Research limitations/implications

The paper has mentioned limitations: the restriction on selecting industry, company and brand, the restraint of sampling coverage and lack of generalization of the study findings. The implications should be interpreted with care. In this study we have not compared different brands from same industry or brands from different industries; there is a scope to do so. Moreover, this study considers results from one national context and, consequently, cross-national study may be conducted to extend the validity of the findings.

Practical implications

The findings from this study may enlighten brand marketers about the degree of influence of brand personality, corporate personality, and consumer personality on brand preference. This study advocates interaction effects of individual, brand and corporate on consumer brand preference. From this study perspective, we may say, brand personality and corporate personality provide significant opportunity for creation of uniqueness and have the potential to significantly influence brand preference.

Originality/value

This paper makes two contributions to the brand management literature. First, it provides new empirical evidence of the positive main effect of individual and brand personality on brand preference. Second, this paper first investigates interaction effects of individual personality, brand personality and corporate personality on brand preference. This is a very unique contribution of the paper. The results provide new insights for academic and practitioners into the relationship among individual personality, brand personality and corporate personality. This study is the first attempt to fill this research gap by investigating the impact of consumer personality, brand personality and corporate personality on brand preference.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 28 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 September 2000

Fareena Sultan and Roy B. Henrichs

Investigates time as a factor that influences consumer preferences for innovative technological services such as the Internet. Specifically, the case of consumer adoption…

Abstract

Investigates time as a factor that influences consumer preferences for innovative technological services such as the Internet. Specifically, the case of consumer adoption of the Internet for home use is explored. Examines the effect of time of adoption of Internet based services on preferences at the individual consumer level. The key research question is “What is the effect of time of adoption on consumer preferences for a technological service such as the Internet?” The primary contribution of this research is to demonstrate that existing time preference frameworks, previously applied to consumer durable products, can also be applied to technological service innovations, such as the Internet. An empirical examination is conducted using data from a survey of consumers in the initial stages of Internet adoption.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 17 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 3 June 2014

Heekang Moon and Hyun-Hwa Lee

The purpose of this study is to investigate consumers’ intention to use mass customization by incorporating preference fit and their ability to express preferences into…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate consumers’ intention to use mass customization by incorporating preference fit and their ability to express preferences into the theory of planned behaviour and to examine how consumers perceive behavioural control over the process of online mass customization (OMC). Preference fit, which refers to fit between consumer preference and product attributes, and ability to express preferences were integrated into theory of planned behaviour as two belief variables related to OMC.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 346 potential respondents were invited via e-mail to participate in the present study acquired from an independent marketing company. We conducted a self-administrated online survey using a video clip with voice instructions to demonstrate the OMC process as a stimulus.

Findings

The results suggest that consumers’ attitudes and perceived behavioural control predicted their OMC use intentions. Preference fit positively affected consumers’ attitudes towards OMC as a behavioural belief, and the ability to express preferences positively influenced preference fit but did not predict perceived behavioural control as a control belief. Clothing involvement was a positive predictor of preference fit and the ability to express preferences.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the OMC literature by suggesting a theoretical framework by extending the theory of planned behaviour and identifying consumers’ belief variables as antecedents of attitudes and perceived behavioural control in the OMC context. In addition, the study examines the role of clothing involvement in facilitating consumers’ OMC beliefs, suggesting the crucial role of clothing involvement as one of individual factors extending theory of planned behaviour framework, in the OMC process.

Details

Journal of Research in Interactive Marketing, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7122

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 3 August 2015

Raden Aswin Rahadi, Sudarso Kaderi Wiryono, Deddy Priatmodjo Koesrindartoto and Indra Budiman Syamwil

– The purpose of this paper is to compare the different preferences between property practitioners and residential consumers on housing prices in the Jakarta Metropolitan Region.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to compare the different preferences between property practitioners and residential consumers on housing prices in the Jakarta Metropolitan Region.

Design/methodology/approach

The Jakarta Metropolitan Region as the largest metropolitan city in Indonesia was selected as the main sample city for this study. This study comprises 134 respondents from property practitioners and 277 respondents from residential consumers. Data were collected from all regions in Jakarta Metropolitan Region and their respective satellite cities. Descriptive analysis, the correlation study, Wilcoxon t-test and principal component analysis were used to compare the findings between each group’s preferences on housing attributes.

Findings

The results of this research provide an analysis on the different decisive attributes for each group, disparities on the correlation between attributes in housing consumers and property practitioners and disagreements among each group on the attribute preferences influencing housing prices in the Jakarta Metropolitan Region.

Research limitations/implications

In conclusion, the study provides valid and dependable evidence on different consumers and property practitioners attribute preferences for housing products in the Jakarta Metropolitan Region.

Originality/value

This research is the first to compare the attribute preferences for housing products between housing consumers and property practitioners in Indonesia. In addition, this study is one of the first to reaffirm preference attributes influencing housing product prices in Indonesia.

Details

International Journal of Housing Markets and Analysis, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8270

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 27 September 2011

José Luis Méndez, Javier Oubiña and Natalia Rubio

This paper aims to analyze the relative importance of brand‐packaging, price and taste in the formation of brand preference for manufacturer and store brands in food…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to analyze the relative importance of brand‐packaging, price and taste in the formation of brand preference for manufacturer and store brands in food product categories.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors first perform a blind taste test of the product using three brands (two manufacturer brands and one store brand) in two categories with differentiated characteristics (cola drinks and olives stuffed with anchovies). They then use conjoint analysis to analyze the influence of the intrinsic cue (taste) and the extrinsic cues (price and brand‐packaging) on consumers' preference for manufacturer and store brands. Finally, after telling the consumers which taste belongs to each brand, the authors study the influence of the extrinsic cues on the consumers' quality evaluations of the real stimuli.

Findings

The results show that not knowing the brand to which the taste tested belongs, leads consumers in general to order their preferences fundamentally by taste. However, the results differ by product category and consumer segment analyzed. Consumers who evaluate the taste of store brands as better change their preferences more when they know which brand belongs to which taste. Further, the change in preference when consumers know the brand‐taste correspondence is clearly greater in the most differentiated category.

Research limitations/implications

The main limitations of this research derive from the factors conditioning the information. A greater number of categories and attributes would enrich the information. In addition, it would be useful to analyze more than one store brand.

Practical implications

The results obtained have interesting implications for manufacturers and retailers concerning management of the brands in their product portfolio and management of their relationships in the distribution channel.

Originality/value

The main contribution of this paper lies in the work methodology used. The paper offers a comprehensive analysis of how the relative importance of brand‐packaging, price and taste affect brand preference for manufacturer and store brands. The study also contributes evidence on how the consumer's knowledge of the correspondence between brand and taste can change his or her brand preferences, an issue of great interest for manufacturers and distributors in managing their product portfolios.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 113 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 March 1988

Naresh K. Malhotra

This article presents an approach for measuring consumer preferences in developing countries. The role of marketing research in developing countries and the salient…

Abstract

This article presents an approach for measuring consumer preferences in developing countries. The role of marketing research in developing countries and the salient factors which have an impact on how marketing research should be conducted in these countries are briefly discussed. The popular preference measurement procedures developed in the advanced nations are briefly reviewed and found to be unsuitable for use in developing countries. Hence, an alternative approach is proposed which reduces the data collection demands imposed on the respondents. It makes use of pictorial or visual stimuli and requires input from the respondents using a simple binary scale. An empirical investigation illustrating the proposed approach is reported. The convergent validity of the proposed procedure is assessed and found to be highly satisfactory.

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 9 May 2016

Sangkil Moon, Junhee Kim, Barry L. Bayus and Youjae Yi

The purpose of this paper is to provide insightful advice that can improve the practice of using consumers’ pre-launch awareness and preference (AP) changes to predict the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide insightful advice that can improve the practice of using consumers’ pre-launch awareness and preference (AP) changes to predict the sales of new movies.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper applies a new movie box-office revenue forecasting model based on consumers’ weekly AP measures, to take advantage of the industry’s practice of using weekly survey data containing the AP measures of upcoming new movies. Specifically, a sales forecasting model is developed on the basis of the theory that the combination of the nature of new product preference (positive vs negative) and the timing of new product awareness (early vs recent) influences entertainment product sales.

Findings

This paper shows that early awareness consumers are as important as late awareness consumers in determining new product sales, suggesting that more marketing resources need to be allocated earlier than currently practiced. This paper also shows that when negative preferences dominate positive preferences well ahead of a product’s release, marketing efforts cannot overcome the negative sentiment of the market. Finally, the empirical application illustrates that three consumer segments varying in product expertise and consumption frequency reveal different AP patterns among high-, medium- and low-performance products.

Originality/value

This paper is intended to provide insightful advice that can improve the AP-based approach in entertainment industries. Toward that end, the authors emphasize two major aspects in association with new entertainment product sales: rethinking survey-based AP measures and examining heterogeneous consumer segments’ differential AP patterns.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 50 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 24 October 2019

Xiaoquan Chu, Yue Li, Yimeng Xie, Dong Tian and Weisong Mu

The purpose of this paper is to provide further insight into Chinese wine consumerspreference, grasp the regional sensory preference differences of China and build up a…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide further insight into Chinese wine consumerspreference, grasp the regional sensory preference differences of China and build up a predictive model for wine consumers’ sensory preferences.

Design/methodology/approach

The study involved 3,421 Chinese wine consumers in the survey. Classified statistics were conducted to excavate regional differences of wine consumers’ sensory preferences. By analyzing influencing factors, prediction models for consumers’ sensory attribute preferences were constructed on the basis of multivariate disorder logistic regression method.

Findings

Empirical research showed that the wine with the following sensory attributes was the most preferred by Chinese consumers: dry red, refreshing and soft taste, still type, moderate aroma degree and mellow aroma, and sweet wine was also popular. Consumerspreference varied from region to region. The proposed predicting method of the study realized more than 70 percent accuracy when conducting prediction for color, sweetness, aroma type and flavor preferences.

Social implications

By shedding light on the latest sensory attribute preferences of Chinese wine consumers, this study will help wine industry participants conduct market segmentation based on the diversification of consumerspreferences. The wine enterprises can gain guidance from the results to conduct market positioning, adjust strategies and provide specific production for target wine consumers.

Originality/value

Based on the actual situation of Chinese wine market, this study defines sensory attribute indexes of wine from the perspective of wine consumers and presents the most recent comprehensive research on the sensory preferences of Chinese wine consumers through a nationwide survey.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 122 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 8 May 2020

Florence Charton-Vachet, Cindy Lombart and Didier Louis

This research has three research objectives. First, this research will demonstrate that the link between consumers' attitude towards a region and their intention to…

Abstract

Purpose

This research has three research objectives. First, this research will demonstrate that the link between consumers' attitude towards a region and their intention to purchase products from that region is not direct but indirect. Second, this research will establish that perceived value of regional products and consumers' preference for these products are mediating variables of the relationship between consumers' attitude towards a region and their intention to purchase regional products. Lastly, this research will highlight cognitive (through perceived value) and affective (through preference) routes or paths, from consumers' attitude towards a region to their purchase intention of products from that region.

Design/methodology/approach

As previous works in the authors’ field of research, the authors conducted a field study, combined with a questionnaire survey. 398 consumers responded to the authors’ questionnaire in a hypermarket (belonging to the retailer Système U) in Vendée (a region in France). The authors measured their attitude towards this region, their preference for regional food products and their purchase intention of these products as well as the perceived value of regional food products.

Findings

The perceived value of regional products and consumers' preference for these products are full mediating variables of the relationship between consumers' attitude towards a region and their intention to purchase products from that region.

Research limitations/implications

This research supplements prior works. It shows that the link between consumers' attitude towards a region and their intention to purchase regional products is indirect. Consumers' purchase intention of regional products is not directly attributable to their attitude towards the region of origin of these products. Regional products and their features have to be reintegrated into this equation.

Practical implications

This study identifies several routes or paths to explain consumers' purchase intention of regional products. A cognitive route or path, from consumers' attitude towards a region to their purchase intention of products from that region, mediates by perceived value. An affective route or path, from consumers' attitude towards a region to their purchase intention of products from that region, mediates by preference. A hybrid path that combines cognitive and affective paths, as this research established a link between perceived value and preference.

Originality/value

This research foregrounds regional products and their features, too often neglected in favour of consumers and their characteristics.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 48 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 4 May 2020

Rambod Dargahi, Aidin Namin and Seth Ketron

The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate how consumers choose among three different options offered by a firm in a monopolistic setting, namely, to buy a standard…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate how consumers choose among three different options offered by a firm in a monopolistic setting, namely, to buy a standard product with a non-customizable design, to ask the firm to customize a product using the consumer’s ideal design or to do the entire design task by themselves. The authors also investigate how social preference intensity and the possibility of reselling a product influence a consumer’s decision.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors develop an analytical (game theoretical) consumer choice framework and incorporate a psychological factor into the model. The authors also empirically validate the analytical findings using simulations.

Findings

The authors find that as social preference intensity increases, the number of co-producers can either decrease or increase. The authors offer a closed-form solution and interval graphs showing that when the setup price is large (small), the proportion of the market that chooses to do-it-yourself (DIY) is large (small) and an increase in social preference intensity leads to a decrease (increase) in co-production.

Originality/value

This is the first paper to incorporate a social factor into an economic model in a consumer behavior setting. It is also the first paper to explain how customers’ preferences among possible options, such as DIY (without the firm’s help), co-production (with the firm’s help) and a standard product might change while considering other people’s preferences, as well as given associated costs.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 30 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 38000