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Article
Publication date: 8 March 2022

Ateeque Shaikh, Kaushik Mukerjee and Shubhomoy Banerjee

The study examines the role of attitude, perceived relative advantage and perceived risk on intention to participate in the sharing economy–based cab services in India…

Abstract

Purpose

The study examines the role of attitude, perceived relative advantage and perceived risk on intention to participate in the sharing economy–based cab services in India. Further, it investigates the impact of intention to participate in the sharing economy on transformation expectations of consumers. Finally, the study tests the moderating role of materialism in the relationship between intention to participate in the sharing economy and transformation expectations of consumers.

Design/methodology/approach

This study used cross-sectional survey research design to collect data from 408 respondents through online questionnaire in India, an emerging market. The study analysed the data using structural equation modelling technique using IBM AMOS software.

Findings

The findings of the study suggest that perceived relative advantage and attitude influences the intention to participate in the sharing economy. Intention to participate in the sharing economy positively influences transformation expectations. Materialism moderates the relationship between intention to participate and transformation expectations of consumers.

Research limitations/implications

In a departure from previous studies, this study establishes that perceived risk may not be an important factor driving the intention to participate in the sharing economy. Further, it is among the first studies to establish the role of intention to participate in the sharing economy as a possible driver of transformation expectations.

Practical implications

The importance of transformation expectations can be communicated as an outcome to encourage participation in the sharing economy. Managers can highlight the relative advantages to promote participation in the sharing economy.

Originality/value

This study is probably the first attempt to understand the transformation expectations of consumers in the sharing economy. Further, the study tests the moderating role of materialism in the relationship between intention to participate and transformation expectation of consumers.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 12 March 2021

Bach Quang Ho and Kunio Shirahada

The purpose of this paper is to develop a process model for the role transformation of vulnerable consumers through support services.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop a process model for the role transformation of vulnerable consumers through support services.

Design/methodology/approach

The study is based on four years of participant observation at a community-based support service and in-depth interviews with the consumers. Visual ethnography was used to document the process of the consumers' role transformation through service exchanges.

Findings

The main outcome of this study is a consumer transformation model, describing consumers' role transformation processes, from recipients to generic actors. The model demonstrates that vulnerable consumers will transform from recipients to quasi-actors before becoming generic actors.

Social implications

Vulnerable consumers' participation in value cocreation can be promoted by providing social support according to their dynamic roles. By enabling consumers to participate in value cocreation, social support provision can become sustainable and inclusive, especially in rural areas affected by aging and depopulation. Transforming recipients into generic actors should be a critical aim of service provision in the global challenge of aging societies.

Originality/value

Beyond identifying service factors, the research findings describe the mechanism of consumers' role transformation process as a service mechanics study. Furthermore, this study contributes to transformative service research by applying social exchange theory and broadening service-dominant logic by describing the process of consumer growth for individual and community well-being.

Details

Journal of Service Theory and Practice, vol. 31 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2055-6225

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 26 July 2019

Thuy D. Nguyen, Shih Yung Chou, Charles Blankson and Phillip Wilson

This paper aims to offer a systematic view of religious consumption and its iterative influences on consumers, as well as their differences in attitudes, values and behaviors.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to offer a systematic view of religious consumption and its iterative influences on consumers, as well as their differences in attitudes, values and behaviors.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a mixed-method approach – both qualitative and quantitative – the study develops religious self-transformation and self-categorization scales to empirically evaluate the hypotheses.

Findings

The convergence of consumption, self-identification and religious attitudes and behaviors proffer an essentially subjective concept useful in understanding the existential reflection and supernatural orientation that individuals may seek through consumption. Cluster analysis (based on product, services, media and practices) reveals four quadrants. The non-religious (religious) group has low (high) consumption in all four consumption categories Self-categorization (self-transformation) group has high (low) level of product consumption, but low (high) in all three other categories. This research presented four invisible identities that are visibly different in terms of life satisfaction, religious brand preference, dollars spending on religious products and monetary donation.

Research limitations/implications

This research only considers one medium-size city as opposed to all types of cities. All religious affiliated and nonaffiliated respondents are included in the total sample.

Practical implications

The study offers new insights into the triadic relationship between religious self-identification, religious consumption, and the marketplace that can be used in branding, segmentation, targeting, positioning, and persuasive advertising, public relation and social media, and services marketing.

Social implications

Religion addresses the nature of existence. In this religion–consumer–brand nexus, consumption is a way for consumers to experience and immense themselves in the sacred to solidify, communicate, transform, improve and transport who they are capitalizing on religious self-identification can affectively promote positive social change.

Originality/value

This work proposes four invisible identities that are different in consumption of religious products and services in terms of patterns and purposes. These groups of consumers shape the marketplace through the derived utility of their religious consumption based on their self-identification, which in turn influences their religious brand preference.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 29 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 16 November 2015

Johan Hagberg and Daniel Normark

– This study aims to follow the gradual transformation of consumer mobility in mid-20th-century Sweden in connection with the introduction of self-service retailing.

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Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to follow the gradual transformation of consumer mobility in mid-20th-century Sweden in connection with the introduction of self-service retailing.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is based on an analysis of the magazine ICA-Tidningen, published by the major Swedish retailer ICA, for the period from 1941 to 1970.

Findings

The paper describes the transformation of consumer mobility as a set of interrelated changes that involved both retailers and consumers, the interrelationship between modes of transport and container technologies and how self-service not only transformed the interior of retail stores but also had more far-reaching implications.

Originality/value

When attempting to understand the reconfiguration of shopping practices in the 20th century, there is a tendency to focus on large infrastructural changes. These studies tend to overlook gradual, mundane and everyday translations. This paper contributes methodological tools and analyses that account for such mundane transformations.

Details

Journal of Historical Research in Marketing, vol. 7 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-750X

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 7 June 2007

Katherine Sredl

As Comaroff and Comaroff argue, in their discussion of the intersection of ethnographical research and historical perspectives, social change is a dynamic process in which…

Abstract

As Comaroff and Comaroff argue, in their discussion of the intersection of ethnographical research and historical perspectives, social change is a dynamic process in which existing social and political tensions, local and global, are played out, with an uncertain outcome. Change is often about how competing groups come to power (Comaroff & Comaroff, 1992). Consumer researchers have already applied this perspective on class, consumption, and change in places as widespread as Niger and the US, but not to Eastern Europe.

Details

Consumer Culture Theory
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-984-4

Article
Publication date: 1 May 1992

Avraham Shama

Centres on the transformation of the consumer in Russia, Hungaryand Poland. Reports on a study, carried out in co‐operation withscholars in these countries, which uses…

Abstract

Centres on the transformation of the consumer in Russia, Hungary and Poland. Reports on a study, carried out in co‐operation with scholars in these countries, which uses focus groups to outline the impact on consumers of the transformation to a market economy, and discusses the adjustments these consumers have been making in response to new economic realities. Concludes with research propositions and by pointing out implications for international marketing managers.

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 9 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 July 2015

Michal J Carrington, Ben Neville and Robin Canniford

This study aims to explore: consumer experiences of intense moral dilemma arising from identity multiplicity conflict, expressed in the marketplace, which demand stark…

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Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to explore: consumer experiences of intense moral dilemma arising from identity multiplicity conflict, expressed in the marketplace, which demand stark moral choices and consumer response to intensely felt moral tension where their sense of coherent moral self is at stake.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors gathered ethnographic data from amongst ethical consumers, and theorised the data through theory of life projects and life themes to explain how multiplicity can become an unmanageable problem in the midst of moral dilemma.

Findings

The authors reveal that in contrast to notions of liberating or manageable multiplicity conflict, some consumers experience intense moral anxiety that is unmanageable. The authors find that this unmanageable moral tension can provoke consumers to transform self and consumption choices to construct a coherent moral self. The authors identify this transformation as the meta life project.

Research limitations/implications

This work contributes to knowledge of multiplicity, consumer life themes and life projects, moral dilemma and ethical consumption by showing that some experiences of moral anxiety arising from multiplicity conflict are unmanageable, and these consumers seek moral self re-unification through the meta life project.

Practical implications

This study provides practical guidance to companies, marketers, public organisations and activist groups seeking to understand and harness consumers’ moral codes to promote ethical consumption practices.

Originality/value

The authors extend current theory of multiplicity into the moral domain to illustrate limitations of framing consumer experiences of multiplicity conflict as being either liberating or manageable when consumers’ sense of moral self is at stake. This article is of interest to academic, marketing practitioner and public policy audiences.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 49 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 17 April 2020

Alison Dean and Nur Indrianti

The purpose of this study is to explore how value creation and transformative service research (TSR) are interconnected at the base of the pyramid (BoP). To do so, the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to explore how value creation and transformative service research (TSR) are interconnected at the base of the pyramid (BoP). To do so, the study seeks consumers’ perceptions of changes in well-being from value creation and the means by which these changes become transformative.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative, longitudinal design was used, involving a community education project in Indonesia. Data collection consisted of interviews with Etawa goat farmers and village leaders after one year (n = 21), and a further three years (n = 10).

Findings

Findings from the study are used to advance a model for value creation and TSR at the BoP, which identifies three critical change periods within consumers. These periods suggest that creating improvements in well-being of consumers requires their initial recognition of value outcomes, realisation of agency and a new vision for the future.

Research limitations/implications

Research in other contexts is warranted to confirm the model, to further explore well-being from service at the BoP and to identify issues that diminish consumers’ confidence and stall transformation. Methodological challenges at the BoP also present avenues for insightful work.

Practical implications

Transformative service at BoP requires an emphasis on suitable structures, collaborative processes and management skills to facilitate consumers gaining agency and control, so that they can use their new and existing resources effectively and/or differently.

Social implications

Participants highlighted positive changes to well-being at both individual and collective levels. Notably, some changes were not directly related to initial service provision but reflected improvements, such as employment for women, and better hygiene, health and education of families.

Originality/value

By exploring the interconnection between transformative service and value creation, this study addresses the issue of when value creation becomes transformative and vital for poverty alleviation at the BoP. The proposed model incorporates TSR, service logic and other literature, illustrates a process moving from value determination to value expansion and highlights three critical intrasubjective change periods within actors.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 34 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 30 January 2018

Sarah Dodds, Sandy Bulmer and Andrew Murphy

Consumer experiences of healthcare services are challenging for researchers to study because of the complex, intangible and temporal nature of service provision. The…

Abstract

Purpose

Consumer experiences of healthcare services are challenging for researchers to study because of the complex, intangible and temporal nature of service provision. The purpose of this paper is to introduce a novel longitudinal three-phase research protocol, which combines iterative interviewing with visual techniques. This approach is utilised to study consumer service experiences, dimensions of consumer value and consumer value co-creation in a transformational service setting: complementary and alternative medicine healthcare.

Design/methodology/approach

This research employed a three-phase qualitative longitudinal research protocol, which incorporated: an initial in-depth interview, implementation of the visual elicitation technique Zaltman Metaphor Elicitation Technique and a final interview to gain participant feedback on the analysis of data collected in the first two phases.

Findings

Four key benefits derived from using the three-phase protocol are reported: confirmation and elaboration of consumer value themes, emergence of underreported themes, evidence of transformation and refinement of themes, ensuring dependability of data and subsequent theory development.

Originality/value

The study provides evidence that a longitudinal multi-method approach using in-depth interviews and visual methods is a powerful tool that service researchers should consider, particularly for transformative service research settings with sensitive contexts, such as healthcare, and when studying difficult to articulate concepts, such as consumer value and value co-creation.

Details

Journal of Service Theory and Practice, vol. 28 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2055-6225

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 22 August 2022

Prashant Kumar

This study investigates shifts in luxury consumers' perceptions regarding luxury consumption, subsequent changes in the meaning of luxury and antecedents of luxury…

Abstract

Purpose

This study investigates shifts in luxury consumers' perceptions regarding luxury consumption, subsequent changes in the meaning of luxury and antecedents of luxury observed amidst the COVID-19 pandemic.

Design/methodology/approach

Overall, 145, one-to-one qualitative interviews were conducted online with luxury consumers and the data acquired was analysed using NVivo.

Findings

Phygital connectedness and access-based consumption are the future of luxury for luxury consumers' well-being, social connectedness, living experience and rational and thoughtful luxury consumption. Moreover, distinct luxury symbols (e.g. conciseness towards societal connotation of luxury goods and consumption, empathy, wisdom and maturity) and transformation expectations (for the self, others in society and luxury brands) govern luxury consumption behaviour.

Research limitations/implications

The meaning of luxury amidst the pandemic is explained along a continuum, from luxury transforming consumers' inner selves to influencing other consumers' lives to transforming society.

Practical implications

Luxury professionals should include phygital experience, sustainability, social–cultural sensitivity, empathy, symbolism, mindfulness and thoughtfulness in marketing strategies.

Originality/value

New perspectives have enriched the realm of luxury.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 30000