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Article
Publication date: 5 October 2015

Paula Rodrigues and Ana Pinto Borges

This study aims to explore the relationship between the consumer perceptions of corporate social responsibility (CSR) and the buying behaviour in the brand clothing Salsa

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Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to explore the relationship between the consumer perceptions of corporate social responsibility (CSR) and the buying behaviour in the brand clothing Salsa. This paper intends to analyse if the consumer knows about the meaning of social responsibility in the economic, social and environmental contexts.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper used a survey to assess the perception of the consumer of the social responsibility practices of the Salsa brand. The questionnaires were administered to consumers in the north of Portugal. The survey questions were tested through an exploratory factor analysis. A least squares estimation was performed to test the hypotheses.

Findings

The consumers revealed that they have four dimensions of perceptions of CSR: ecological reasons, no discrimination reasons, recycling reasons and communication reasons. The results suggest that the consumers consider that there are four aspects of CSR: economic, social, ecological and recycling. When it was verified that the personal concerns, regarding environment and recycling, play an important role in consumer decision, the seven stages of the consumer decision process developed by Blackwell et al. (2006) were evaluated. In this sense, it was observed that the knowledge of social responsibility practices and the dimensions of perceptions of CSR revealed by the consumers influence the purchase of the company’s products.

Originality/value

This paper obtained an interesting result in the sense that the consumers distinguish the environmental aspects on ecological and recycling. It is also observed that this distinction, allied to the knowledge of social responsibility practices carried out by the company, leads to the affirmation that the final disinvestment stage of the consumer decision process plays an important role in consumer decision.

Details

Social Responsibility Journal, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-1117

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 May 2015

Maryam Tofighi and H. Onur Bodur

The purpose of this paper is to explore how social responsibility initiatives can be integrated into different tiers of retailers’ private label brands (PLB) and…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore how social responsibility initiatives can be integrated into different tiers of retailers’ private label brands (PLB) and introduces a conceptual model and opposing predictions building on research in social responsibility and evolutionary psychology. The empirical evidence from two studies suggests that retailers should consider the type of PLB (i.e. quality tier) in the introduction of social responsibility initiatives.

Design/methodology/approach

To investigate opposing predictions, the authors conducted two experiments with presence of social responsibility initiative and PLB quality tier as the factors. The authors present the results from 168 Canadian consumers focussing on two product categories.

Findings

The findings of two experiments are more consistent with an explanation based on resource synergy beliefs rather than costly signaling theory. Social responsibility initiatives enhanced consumer evaluations of high-quality PLBs, but hurt consumer evaluations of low-tier PLBs.

Practical implications

Retailers should differentiate the way they accommodate social responsibility initiatives based on the type of their PLBs. Specifically, the beneficial effect of social responsibility initiative only exist for high-tier PLBs. Introducing social responsibility initiatives may hurt preference for low-tier PLBs.

Originality/value

This paper is the first to propose two theoretical models that address how social responsibility initiatives can affect consumer evaluations of PLBs. The initial empirical evidence is more coherent with resource synergy beliefs explanation rather than costly signaling explanation. These results suggest that social responsibility initiatives have asymmetric effects for different tiers of retailers’ PLBs.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 43 no. 4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 February 2016

Hongwei He, Weichun Zhu, Dennis Gouran and Olivia Kolo

This paper aims to examine how consumer moral identity (MI) affects the impact of cause-related marketing (CRM). CRM is a popular hybrid marketing tool that incorporates…

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine how consumer moral identity (MI) affects the impact of cause-related marketing (CRM). CRM is a popular hybrid marketing tool that incorporates charitable initiatives and sales promotion. CRM has strength in simultaneously encouraging consumer purchases and doing something good for the society. Drawing on the moral identity (MI)-based motivation model, this research examines how consumer MI influences consumer behavioural response to CRM.

Design/methodology/approach

Two field experiments were conducted to test a series of hypotheses relating to the conditional effect of MI on behavioural response to CRM.

Findings

Brand social responsibility image and emotional brand attachment positively moderated the relationship between consumer MI centrality and intention to purchase CRM sponsor brand.

Originality/value

Findings contribute to the literature on CRM, MI-based motivation of consumer behaviour and emotional brand attachment.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 50 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 April 2022

Mark Ng

With the rapid increase in corporate social responsibility (CSR) practices in many firms and the development of social enterprises (SE), questions regarding the ways in…

Abstract

Purpose

With the rapid increase in corporate social responsibility (CSR) practices in many firms and the development of social enterprises (SE), questions regarding the ways in which CSR affects consumers’ attitudes and behaviours have become crucial. This study aims to investigate how consumers’ CSR expectations and knowledge relate to their attitudes and purchase intentions regarding SE products.

Design/methodology/approach

This study investigates how consumer expectations of CSR and their own social responsibility affects purchase intention of SE products. The hypotheses are tested on a sample of 397 individuals recruited through snowball sampling online. The research hypotheses are tested by structural equation modelling. Most of the hypotheses are supported by the data analysis.

Findings

The results show that consumers’ CSR expectations, subjective knowledge and consumer’s perceived social responsibility (CPSR) have positive effects on their attitudes and purchase intentions concerning SE products. The results contribute to the literature on marketing of SE products and demonstrate that consumer CSR expectation and their CPSR are important antecedents of intention to purchase SE products.

Originality/value

There is limited empirical study on the purchase intention of SE products. The findings provide the empirical evidence that individual-level antecedents, including consumer’s CSR expectations, perceived social responsibility and subjective knowledge, have a significant relationship to their intentions to SE products. This study also supports the view that the general rise in CSR expectations and CPSR creates a favourable context for the marketing of SE products.

Article
Publication date: 12 August 2020

Edward Shih-Tse Wang and Chih-Feng Chou

Although the relationships between subjective norms, personal norms, consumer social responsibility and consumer attitude have been studied, the direct or indirect…

1045

Abstract

Purpose

Although the relationships between subjective norms, personal norms, consumer social responsibility and consumer attitude have been studied, the direct or indirect relationships that potentially exist between these factors influencing consumer purchase intention remain unclear. Because attracting consumers to purchase fair trade (FT) products is fundamental to the success of the FT movement, the study introduced a theoretical framework that emphasizes the mediating role of personal norms and consumer attitude towards FT product purchases in the effects of subjective norms and consumer social responsibility on consumer purchase intention towards FT products.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from 398 university students; structural equation modelling was applied to analyse the data. Mediation analysis was also performed to determine potential direct or indirect relationships between factors.

Findings

The results revealed that subjective norms and responsibility to support FT products affect personal norms and attitude towards purchasing such products, which in turn influenced consumer purchase intention toward purchasing these products. Personal norms partially mediate the influence of subjective norms and consumer social responsibility on attitudes towards purchasing FT products. By contrast, the consumer attitude fully mediates the effects of subjective norms, consumer social responsibility and personal norms on purchase intentions towards FT products.

Originality/value

Because consumer purchasing is critical to the success of the FT movement and to achieving the UN's SDGs, this study helps FT marketers to better understand the effects of subjective norms and consumer social responsibility on consumer behavioural intentions and to develop effective marketing and promotion strategies for increasing consumer purchase intention.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 49 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 June 2018

Denni I. Arli and Fandy Tjiptono

In the past few years, companies have made significant contributions towards Corporate Social Responsibilities (CSR) as a strategy to improve business image. Nonetheless…

1371

Abstract

Purpose

In the past few years, companies have made significant contributions towards Corporate Social Responsibilities (CSR) as a strategy to improve business image. Nonetheless, many of these strategies have been unsuccessful because companies have failed to recognise the importance of consumers’ ethical beliefs and their religiosity in forming their perception towards CSR. Thus, the purpose of this study is to explore the level of importance of consumers’ ethical beliefs and social responsibilities (CnSR) and to examine the impact of consumers’ religiosity and ethical beliefs on CnSR.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were derived from a sample of undergraduate and postgraduate students at three large universities (i.e. one public and two private universities) in Yogyakarta, Indonesia (N = 416). Indonesia is the largest Muslim population in the world.

Findings

7The study found that consumers value social responsibilities differently and that not all dimensions are important. Moreover, consumer ethical beliefs and religiosity significantly influence CnSR. The results of this study will contribute to the debate on consumer ethics and social responsibility research.

Research limitations/implications

The current study has some limitations which, in turn, provide avenues for future research. The research context (one city in one country) may limit its generalizability. Future studies may focus on more cities and/or cross-country sections (developed versus developing countries) as well as use non-student populations.

Practical implications

Companies operating in Indonesia need to respect and value religiosity in Indonesia. Collaborating with a faith-based institution may help improve the effectiveness of CSR programmes launched by companies.

Originality/value

This is one of the first few studies exploring CSR in Indonesia.

Details

Social Responsibility Journal, vol. 14 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-1117

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 August 2011

Shruti Gupta

The objective of this research is to examine the perception of corporate social responsibility (CSR) held by consumers in India and America in order to draw out…

3103

Abstract

Purpose

The objective of this research is to examine the perception of corporate social responsibility (CSR) held by consumers in India and America in order to draw out similarities and differences in conceptualization and response.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper uses a web‐based questionnaire in English, given that it is most commonly used for professional communication in India. A qualitative analysis of participant responses to open‐ended questions was conducted to generate results.

Findings

There is a substantial portion of US consumers who are unaware of socially responsible companies compared with their Indian counterparts who failed to recognize the CSR initiatives of multinational companies. Qualitative analysis showed that, though there was some overlap in CSR domains between the two countries, each sample also identified domains that were unique. Finally, both country samples also showed a positive level of CSR responsiveness.

Research limitations/implications

The paper used a web‐based questionnaire that allowed the sample to comprise only consumers with internet access.

Practical implications

This research informs multinational (MNC) managers about the parity in consumers' conceptualization of CSR and subsequent response. The study recommends that managers customize CSR programs in emerging markets to overlap with the target market's perception rather than assume a universal definition of the construct as defined in the literature.

Originality/value

This exploratory research expands knowledge in the area of CSR where most of the investigation of consumer stakeholder response has been limited to the North American and European markets.

Details

Social Responsibility Journal, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-1117

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 April 2021

Meier Zhuang, Wenzhong Zhu, Lihui Huang and Wen-Tsao Pan

The main purpose of this paper is to explore the influence mechanism of corporate social responsibility (CSR) for smart cities on consumers' purchase intention. The…

Abstract

Purpose

The main purpose of this paper is to explore the influence mechanism of corporate social responsibility (CSR) for smart cities on consumers' purchase intention. The authors aim to identify the key components of CSR for smart cities based on the perspective of consumers, namely responsibility toward consumers, environment and community and validate their relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors exploit data collected by questionnaire surveys to estimate the effects of CSR for smart cities on consumers' purchase intentions and to investigate the statistical causality between them. The multilinear regression model is used to figure out the different impact levels of the three dimensions of CSR for smart cities on consumers' purchase intention.

Findings

The results illustrate that CSR for smart cities and its three dimensions all have significant positive impacts on consumers' purchase intentions. Besides, consumer–corporate identity (CCI) exerts a partial mediation effect on this influence mechanism.

Research limitations/implications

This research is based on a rather small sample size. Besides, due to the time limitation and other factors, some other control variables are neglected in the regression model. Therefore, the impact level could be distorted.

Practical implications

The authors put forward management implications according to research conclusions. Corporates should actively fulfill the CSR in the field of consumer responsibility to boost consumers' purchase intention. Corporate should strengthen the interaction with consumers to improve their corporate identity.

Originality/value

The main contribution of this paper is to provide convincing evidence of the impacts of CSR for smart cities on consumer purchase intention (CPI), thus proposing effective measures for corporates to win more consumers by taking on social responsibility for smart cities. This paper takes CCI as mediating variable to deepen the understanding of the impacts of CSR for smart cities on CPI, which is innovative and beneficial to enriching literature in related fields.

Details

Library Hi Tech, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 September 2018

Amy Chu-May Yeo, Sky Xiu-Mei Lee and Steve Carter

The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of adopted corporate social responsibility (CSR) constructs, which include economic, legal, ethical and…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of adopted corporate social responsibility (CSR) constructs, which include economic, legal, ethical and philanthropic responsibilities, on the intended buying behaviour of Malaysian consumers. The study also aims to investigate the perceived value of whether the consumers considered an organisation’s CSR initiatives before deciding any purchase of products or services.

Design/methodology/approach

An online Google form survey successfully obtained 295 usable responses through a snowballing and networking approach. Statistical analyses such as Pearson correlation, ANOVA and standard multiple regression were used to examine the correlation and the strength of relationship, as well as the prediction between the CSR attributes and their impact on consumer buying behaviour.

Findings

The results represented a significant positive association between all the four constructs (social, ethical, legal and philanthropic) and consumer intended buying behaviour. These constructs also significantly contributed to the prediction of consumer behaviour towards the CSR initiatives. Conversely, the demographic profile of consumers had no effect on the relationship between CSR and consumer buying behaviour.

Research limitations/implications

Examining basic concepts of CSR awareness and understanding might add to the flavour and rigour of this study, which future research should consider. The positivist approach of the current research could be supplemented with a more interactive qualitative in-depth study investigating why and how consumers behave.

Practical implications

The implication for Malaysian companies is that it is imperative for their long-term survival that a strategic view, rather than just a tactical, reactive or operational view, is taken of their CSR activities. Furthermore, it will help organisations to confidently predict positive intentions towards the sales of goods and services.

Originality/value

The outcome of this study has filled the CSR lacuna in the context of a developing country, as well as adding new insights into the influence and perceived value of CSR on intended consumer buying behaviour. Consumers, irrespective of their age and background, are getting wiser and cautious in purchasing products from companies which are CSR-oriented, in particular, in relation to social, legal, ethical and philanthropic perspectives.

Details

Social Responsibility Journal, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-1117

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 30 July 2018

Abstract

Details

Marketing Management in Turkey
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-558-0

1 – 10 of over 43000