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Article

Julie Fitzmaurice

This exploratory research aims to investigate the consumer splurge purchase and compare characteristics about the splurge purchase for high‐materialism consumers versus…

Abstract

Purpose

This exploratory research aims to investigate the consumer splurge purchase and compare characteristics about the splurge purchase for high‐materialism consumers versus low‐materialism consumers.

Design/methodology/approach

The study sample was a convenience sample of adults over 25 years old and the sample consisted of 107 adults. Data were collected using two methods: an audiotaped, personal interview captured participants' reflections on a recent splurge purchase and a questionnaire which was administered with scales that are well established in the literature.

Findings

A content analysis of consumers' definitions of splurges revealed ten themes including that the purchase is: desired yet not necessary, self‐indulgent, outside the normal purchase, and loosely spending money. High‐materialism consumers were more likely, than low‐materialism consumers, to splurge on items that were displayed on the person and were more likely to describe their splurge as expensive. When reflecting back on their splurge purchase, high‐materialism consumers felt significantly more irresponsible and guilty than did low‐materialism consumers.

Originality/value

The results of the study suggest that consumers do classify some of their purchases as splurges, can reflect on a recent splurge, and have present feelings about past splurge purchases. These feelings do differ between high and low materialism consumers.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 25 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

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Article

Celso Augusto de Matos, Valter Vieira, Katia Bonfanti and Frederike Monika Budiner Mette

The purpose of this is to propose a model in which materialism is a mediator of the effects of self-esteem, impulsiveness, attitude toward debt, attitude toward credit…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this is to propose a model in which materialism is a mediator of the effects of self-esteem, impulsiveness, attitude toward debt, attitude toward credit card and economic vulnerability on consumer indebtedness. The effects of financial knowledge, financial ability, credit card use and demographic variables are also taken into account.

Design/methodology/approach

Survey data from a sample of 1,245 low-income consumers from Brazil were used to test the hypotheses using structural equation modeling.

Findings

First, materialism has a significant effect on consumer indebtedness; at the same time, it is influenced by self-esteem, impulsiveness and attitude toward debt. Second, materialism acts as a mediator, e.g. higher impulsiveness triggers materialism, which influences debt level. Third, indebtedness is higher for women and those who use a higher number of credit cards and are more educated.

Social implications

Financial education programs should work to increase individual’s perceived ability to manage money, as the individuals who feel less able to manage their personal finances alone (i.e. lower financial ability) presented higher indebtedness.

Originality/value

This study investigates consumer indebtedness by addressing factors that have been analyzed independently in the literature. The research combines psychological, financial and economic factors with credit card use and demographic variables to explain consumer indebtedness. Moreover, the study supports the mediating role of materialism for the antecedents of consumer indebtedness, e.g. impulsiveness and attitude toward debt.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 36 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

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Article

Srinivas Durvasula and Steven Lysonski

China is undergoing a radical change as the forces of industrialization and modernization transform its society. Money is taking on an increasingly important role…

Abstract

Purpose

China is undergoing a radical change as the forces of industrialization and modernization transform its society. Money is taking on an increasingly important role, particularly among young Chinese, as the Western ideals of individualism and hedonism thrive. The goal of this research is to understand attitudes towards money in China and how these attitudes affect elements of consumer behavior such as materialism and vanity.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper uses a well‐accepted scale (with several dimensions) to explore attitudes towards money. Research questions examine how the dimensions of attitudes towards money affect materialism and achievement vanity. The sample comprises 127 young Chinese consumers. Statistical results based on confirmatory factor analysis as well as path analysis are reported.

Findings

The findings clearly show that attitudes towards money in China are not monolithic; instead there are variations among young Chinese. Materialism is affected by the power‐prestige and anxiety dimensions, but unaffected by the distrust dimension of money attitudes. Achievement vanity is affected by the power‐prestige dimension of money attitudes.

Research limitations/implications

Future research could examine other developing countries and other generational consumer segments. Another future research topic is to develop a comprehensive model of money attitudes, materialism, vanity, compulsive buying, and their possible antecedents or moderators.

Practical implications

These findings offer insight into the mindset of young Chinese. Beliefs that money permits one to attain not only status and possessions, but also power and control over others are contributing to increased materialism and expressions of vanity among young Chinese. For marketers, the results imply that positioning products based on the possession of money and the use of this money to indulge hedonism may resonate well with young Chinese consumers. However, some of the relationships we found may cause concern to ethicists and consumer watchdogs because of the associated problems of compulsive buying and other problems which are prevalent in consumer societies.

Originality/value

So far, no study has examined whether money attitudes drive materialism and achievement vanity, especially among younger consumers in developing countries such as China.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 27 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

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Article

Sartaj Chaudhary and Ajoy Kumar Dey

Materialism has become a topic of increasing interest to researchers and policymakers because it can influence consumer behavior. However, a clear picture of how this…

Abstract

Purpose

Materialism has become a topic of increasing interest to researchers and policymakers because it can influence consumer behavior. However, a clear picture of how this phenomenon impacts consumers has proven to be elusive. Using an integrated framework, this paper aims to derive hypotheses from theoretical concepts of materialism and consumer decision-making styles and uses a survey of 1,216 respondents in India to test the hypotheses.

Design/methodology/approach

The present study is the first of its kind to test the impact of materialist values on consumer decision-making styles among a sample of 13-18 years old school children. The constructs are validated through a first- and second-order confirmatory factor analysis and an integrated second-order structural model is developed.

Findings

This study finds that materialism is a positive predictor of “recreation/ hedonistic”,; “confused by over-choice”; “brand consciousness”; “perfectionistic high-quality consciousness”; and “habitual brand loyal” style of consumers. Further, materialism has a negative impact on “price value consciousness” of consumers. These findings have important implications for theory and practice.

Research limitations/implications

This study is restricted to school children in the National Capital Region and hence cannot be generalized to the whole young population in India.

Originality/value

Conceptualizing both materialism and consumer decision-making styles as second-order constructs, this is a maiden study that examines the impact of materialistic values on the consumer decision-making styles of young consumers.

Details

Journal of Indian Business Research, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-4195

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Article

Mehmet Demirbag, Sunil Sahadev and Kamel Mellahi

This paper aims to explore the moderating role of materialism in the relationship between country image and product preference with particular reference to emerging economies.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the moderating role of materialism in the relationship between country image and product preference with particular reference to emerging economies.

Design/methodology/approach

Young consumers from a UK university were surveyed on their intention to buy three categories of products from six countries.

Findings

The findings show that the moderating role of materialism in the relationship between country image and product preference is contingent upon the type of product. Specifically, the results show that the effect of materialism as a negative moderator is very pronounced for high value products from emerging economies and less pronounced for low value products from emerging economies.

Research limitations/implications

The findings highlight the role of materialism in purchasing behaviour and buyers' perceptions towards goods from emerging economies.

Practical implications

The findings show that materialism among consumers could be a major stumbling block for multinationals from emerging economies to enter markets in developed countries. The results suggest that multinationals from emerging economies should under‐emphasize the country of origin when marketing to young consumers high in materialism.

Originality/value

This is the first paper that examines the moderating effects of materialism in the relationship between country image and product preference on products from emerging economies.

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 27 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

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Book part

Sandra K. Smith Speck and Teri Peterson

Purpose – The present research seeks insights into the consumer socialization process of both children and adults in a developing country, Peru. The role played by two…

Abstract

Purpose – The present research seeks insights into the consumer socialization process of both children and adults in a developing country, Peru. The role played by two socialization agents, media and church, has been explored in terms of how each is related to an important facet of consumer attitudes, level of materialism.

Methodology/approach – Male students attending a faith-based high school in Peru, as well as one of their parents, completed a survey in Spanish seeking information on their television viewing, their faith, and their views regarding possessions.

Findings – The more traditional socialization institution, church, appears to be less important to younger consumers than to their parents; but it has a greater influence on materialism for youth than their parents. The power of media as a socialization agent for both groups is seen not only via television advertising, but also through television programming.

Research implications – As one considers how consumers learn to be consumers, both from a purely theoretical standpoint as well as from a strategic marketing perspective, one should take into account both avenues for information transmission. The role played by both seems to change people's lives, both in terms of perceived importance, as well as actual consumer decision making.

Details

Research in Consumer Behavior
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-444-4

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Article

Mertcan Tascioglu, Jacqueline Kilsheimer Eastman and Rajesh Iyer

The purpose of the study is to investigate consumers’ perceptions of status motivations on retailers’ sustainability efforts and whether collectivism and materialism

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the study is to investigate consumers’ perceptions of status motivations on retailers’ sustainability efforts and whether collectivism and materialism moderate this relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

A quantitative research methodology using survey data was used. Data were collected by administering questionnaires from millennial respondents (n = 386) from the USA and Turkey.

Findings

The results show that cultural value (collectivism) and materialism can serve as moderators of the effects of status motivation and sustainability. The findings indicate that the link between status motivation and sustainability perceptions (both environmental and social sustainability) is stronger for more collectivist consumers. In terms of materialism, while it did not moderate the relationship between status motivation and perceptions of environmental sustainability, it did moderate the relationship between status motivation and perceptions of social sustainability, particularly the uniqueness aspect of materialism.

Research limitations/implications

The stronger link between status motivation and both environmental and social sustainability for collectivists suggests that the bandwagon effect may be impacting their need for status. The stronger link between status motivation and social sustainability for those more materialistic suggests that their need for status may be more impacted by a snob effect as they want to appear unique. The use of college students is a limitation of this study, and future research needs to explore a wider range of age groups to determine if there are generational differences. Additionally, future research could examine other cultural dimensions such as power distance and masculinity versus femininity.

Practical implications

Findings from this research provide insights for retailers, especially those targeting the status and luxury market when developing their sustainability plans. An interest in sustainability may aid consumers in meeting their need for status, particularly for those status consumers who are more collectivist, as a means to fit in with their group. For more materialistic consumers, retailers may want to focus more on unique social sustainability efforts that are more publicly noticeable.

Social implications

Social sustainability, a topic not studied as frequently as environmental sustainability, has significant implications for consumers. The findings suggest that the link between status motivation and social sustainability is stronger for collectivists, suggesting a bandwagon effect. Additionally, the authors find that the link between status motivation and social sustainability is stronger for materialists, particularly the uniqueness dimension of materialism, suggesting a snob effect.

Originality/value

The originality of this study lies in the exploration of how status motivation impacts consumers’ perceptions of retailers’ environmental and social sustainability efforts and if these relationships are moderated by collectivism and materialism. Few studies have examined social sustainability, especially in terms of culture.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 34 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Keywords

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Article

Jessica Keech, Maureen Morrin and Jeffrey Steven Podoshen

The increasing desire of consumers for socially responsible luxury products combined with fluctuating supplies in consumer markets are leading various industries to seek…

Abstract

Purpose

The increasing desire of consumers for socially responsible luxury products combined with fluctuating supplies in consumer markets are leading various industries to seek alternative sources to be able to meet the needs of its customers. One possible solution that may meet the demands of the future is lab-grown products. Because these products confer multiple benefits, this study aims to investigate the most effective ways to appeal to consumers by aligning the benefits of the products with their values as marketers seek to find effective promotion for these items.

Design/methodology/approach

We examine the effectiveness of an ethical positioning strategy for two types of luxury lab-grown (synthetic) products among high versus low materialism consumers in three experiments.

Findings

Findings suggest that a positioning strategy stressing product ethicality is more effective for low materialism consumers, whereas the strategy is less effective, and may even backfire, for high materialism consumers. The impact on social status consumers perceive from a lab-grown product explains why this effect occurs among low materialism consumers. Therefore, marketers should take caution and use specific appeals for different segments based on values such as consumersmaterialism levels.

Originality/value

If lab-grown products represent the wave of the future, it is important to understand how consumers will respond to this emerging technology and how promotion strategies may enhance their evaluation.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 37 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

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Article

Ronald E. Goldsmith, Leisa R. Flynn and Ronald A. Clark

The purpose of this paper is to show how materialism, brand engagement in self‐concept (BESC), and status consumption influence clothing involvement and brand loyalty.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to show how materialism, brand engagement in self‐concept (BESC), and status consumption influence clothing involvement and brand loyalty.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors use data from a survey of 258 US college students to test a model using structural equation modelling.

Findings

The results show that materialism, BESC, and status consumption positively influence clothing involvement and brand loyalty.

Research limitations/implications

The study findings are bounded by the country and sample providing the data. The results strongly support hypotheses derived from the literature and provide important insights into the motives for clothing involvement and brand loyalty.

Practical implications

The findings suggest that appealing to these three important motivators can influence some consumers to choose specific brands of clothing.

Originality/value

This study is the first to demonstrate the influence of materialism, especially operationalized by Kasser's scale, and brand engagement in self‐concept on these clothing behaviors.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 16 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

Keywords

Content available
Article

Riham Mohamed Talaat

Fashion clothing has always been an interesting area for scholarly research on consumer behavior. This paper seeks to gain a better understanding of the youth involvement…

Abstract

Purpose

Fashion clothing has always been an interesting area for scholarly research on consumer behavior. This paper seeks to gain a better understanding of the youth involvement with fashion clothing in the Egyptian context. Accordingly, the paper considers the Egyptian consumers’ attitude toward fashion involvement by investigating how fashion consciousness and materialism serve as main antecedents of fashion clothing involvement, while also determining the impact of fashion clothing involvement on fashion clothing purchase involvement. This paper aims to test an extended and adapted theoretical model of fashion clothing involvement in Egypt.

Design/methodology/approach

Using non-probabilistic convenience sample, a survey method was used, and 270 valid questionnaires were collected.

Findings

The hypothesized antecedents were found to influence fashion clothing involvement among young Egyptian consumers, which in turn significantly affect its purchasing. Moreover, materialism was also found to partially meditate the relationship between fashion consciousness and fashion involvement. On the other hand, the hypothesized gender role as a moderator between all variables of the study was not supported.

Research limitations/implications

Using a wider population is one avenue future research seeking to replicate this study can pursue. Specifically, because the sample consisted of university students, generalizing the results to non-students can be restricted. Likewise, findings are mainly related to fashion clothing; hence, extending the model to include other product categories can provide more support for the results.

Practical implications

As the results confirmed that there is a partial significant positive impact of fashion consciousness on fashion clothing involvement via materialism, the paper provides practical implications for fashion marketers to achieve successful communication with fashion-conscious and materialistic young Egyptian consumers. The aim is to develop strategies that are consistent with consumers’ values and communicate appeals to their aspirational lifestyle.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to the limited number of the published manuscripts on the fashion clothing marketing sector in Egypt. There is a void in literature related the investigation of fashion clothing involvement in the developing countries. Accordingly, this paper fills this gap by examining the fashion clothing consumption behavior of young Egyptian students in Cairo University. To the best of the author’s knowledge, it is among the first to investigate the antecedents and motives related to fashion clothing involvement and its purchases among young consumers in the Egyptian context. The paper develops a comprehensive model of fashion clothing involvement to highlight the relationships between fashion involvement and Fashion consciousness, materialism, and fashion clothing purchase-involvement. The paper also contributes to the research by exploring materialism as a mediator between fashion consciousness and fashion involvement constructs, in addition to exploring the gender role as a moderator between all constructs of the study. The study makes theoretical contribution to the body of knowledge around young Egyptian consumers’ fashion clothing involvement and purchase behavior toward luxury fashion clothes, which may be extended to other similar Arab non-Western developing countries. Moreover, it offers managerial insights for establishing effective communications with this potentially lucrative market segment.

Details

Journal of Humanities and Applied Social Sciences, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN:

Keywords

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