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Article

Lindsay A.R. Moffat

Suggests that the restructuring of the European‐owned consumerelectronics industry, and the relocation of manufacturing plants withinEurope, will inevitably affect the…

Abstract

Suggests that the restructuring of the European‐owned consumer electronics industry, and the relocation of manufacturing plants within Europe, will inevitably affect the distribution of their products. Considers that the centralization of production capacity, and a move away from country‐by‐country operations, will require major adjustments to transport systems and that incomers may also need to establish new systems of delivery from their new manufacturing points. Examines the current logistics practices and future expectations of major consumer electronics manufacturers operating in Europe, in the context of intense competitive rivalry and changing market structures, using empirical data gathered from companies operating in France, the United Kingdom and West Germany. While there are national differences, the results indicate growing involvement of multiple retailers in the distribution of consumer electronic products, further contracting out of manufacturers′ logistical operations, and growing demands on all logistics systems as order lead‐times continue to shorten.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 22 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

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Article

C.S. Lee and M. Pecht

This paper summarises recent developments inTaiwan’s electronics industry, with a focus on the three major sectors of theindustry:computers (information electronics)…

Abstract

This paper summarises recent developments in Taiwan’s electronics industry, with a focus on the three major sectors of the industry:computers (information electronics), communications, and consumer electronics. Current major business practices and prospects of each industrial sector are discussed. The paper concludes with an assessment of the future development possibilities of Taiwan's electronics industry.

Details

Circuit World, vol. 23 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0305-6120

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Article

Shaun McQuitty and Robin T. Peterson

Provides a perspective on the utilization of the Internet in the consumer electronics market. A preliminary examination of this market‐based on observation of existing Web…

Abstract

Provides a perspective on the utilization of the Internet in the consumer electronics market. A preliminary examination of this market‐based on observation of existing Web sites and secondary research – was conducted to provide a springboard for insights regarding consumer use of the Internet and Web page design. Generalizations regarding the consumer electronics market may be useful in applications to other industries.

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Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 17 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

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Article

Amit Potdar and Jamie Rogers

This paper aims to propose a method for forecasting product returns based on reason codes. The methodology uses two approaches, namely central tendency approach and

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to propose a method for forecasting product returns based on reason codes. The methodology uses two approaches, namely central tendency approach and extreme point approach, and is developed for the consumer electronics industry.

Design/methodology/approach

The methodology presented here is based on the return reason codes (RC). The incoming returns are split into different categories using reason codes. These reason codes are further analyzed to forecast returns. The computation part of this model uses a combination of two approaches, namely extreme point approach and central tendency approach. Both the approaches are used separately for separate types of reason codes and then results are added together. The extreme point approach is based on data envelopment analysis (DEA) as a first step combined with a linear regression while central tendency approach uses a moving average. For certain type of returns, DEA evaluates relative ranks of products using single input and multiple outputs. Once this is completed, linear regression defines a correlation between relative rank (predictor variable) and return quantity (response variable). For the remaining type of returns the authors use a moving average of percent returns to estimate the central tendency.

Findings

Reason codes and consumer behavior in combination with statistical methods can be used to forecast product returns.

Practical implications

Consumer electronics retailers and manufacturers can effectively use this methodology to forecast product returns. This methodology effectively addresses and covers different product return scenarios.

Originality/value

This research paper shows the new way of forecasting product returns i.e. reason codes based forecasting by combining two approaches, namely extreme point approach and central tendency approach. Also, it shows a new way of translating the consumer behavior into meaningful data; that data can be fed to a model to forecast product returns.

Details

Foresight, vol. 14 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6689

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Article

Hongjoo Woo

The purpose of this paper is to examine an alternate halo model across the context of South Korea, China and India, and provide expanded interrelationships among their…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine an alternate halo model across the context of South Korea, China and India, and provide expanded interrelationships among their major brands’ brand images, country images, general product images and category-specific images (electronics and fashion handbags).

Design/methodology/approach

The proposed hypotheses in the alternate halo model were tested through a quantitative (survey) approach.

Findings

The results of analyzing 305 American consumers’ responses suggest theoretical and marketing implications for Asian countries in utilizing brand image effect and cross-category halo effects in marketing products in the global market.

Originality/value

The study proposes an alternate country image model that can be applied to the context of Asian countries with relatively immature country image, which is expanded from the traditional models in literature.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 31 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

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Article

Monika Sheoran and Divesh Kumar

The consumption patterns of humanity are putting an enormous burden on the resources, which are beyond the fulfiling capacity of the earth. These consumption patterns need…

Abstract

Purpose

The consumption patterns of humanity are putting an enormous burden on the resources, which are beyond the fulfiling capacity of the earth. These consumption patterns need to be made sustainable. Therefore, this study aims to focus on identifying the key enablers driving the sustainable consumer behaviour.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on the literature review of 107 studies (1995 to 2018), which were published over a period of 23 years, fourteen key enablers of sustainable consumer behaviour were identified. These 14 enablers were validated with the help of empirical research done by surveying 200 consumers of electronic products. This was followed by the application of interpretive structural modelling (ISM) technique, to get an insight into how these enablers are influencing sustainable consumer behaviour.

Findings

ISM technique and empirical research aided in classifying the enablers based on their driving and dependence power. A further analysis was done to know about the contextual relationship between all 14 enablers and how these enablers are influencing each other and sustainable consumer behaviour. Attitude, subjective norm and perceived controlled behaviour were found dependent variables while education, government policy and advertisement emerged as an autonomous variable.

Research limitations/implications

This study will be helpful for future research in the field of sustainable consumer behaviour. Through understanding of the enablers of sustainable consumer behaviour, a scale can be developed having significant theoretical and managerial implications. This study may help in improving the sustainability initiatives by various stakeholders involved in the process of purchase, usage and dispose of electronic products.

Originality/value

This study is the first temporal and spatial study, which includes a holistic view of the enablers of sustainable consumer behaviour.

Details

Journal of Modelling in Management, vol. 15 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5664

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Case study

Sanjeev Tripathi

Micromax is an Indian consumer electronics company which began by selling mobile phones. In early 2014, Micromax ranked third in the mobile handsets category in India…

Abstract

Micromax is an Indian consumer electronics company which began by selling mobile phones. In early 2014, Micromax ranked third in the mobile handsets category in India, behind Nokia and Samsung. The case is set in 2014, a watershed year for Micromax. It has to make decisions related to the future direction of the company. There are various options available, such as expanding into other consumer electronics and consumer durables categories, expanding outside India, etc. Micromax had recently introduced premium smartphones, and there had been a gradual shift in its target segment from rural to more upmarket consumers. Micromax aspired to be considered among the best brands in the world; however, the company was unsure of how to move forward. Its leadership had to decide on the right positioning for Micromax.

Details

Indian Institute of Management Ahmedabad, vol. no.
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2633-3260
Published by: Indian Institute of Management Ahmedabad

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Article

Lei Nie, Michael Pecht and Richard Ciocci

This paper seeks to investigate the electronics industry's reaction to environmental regulations specifically in terms of lead‐free solders and halogen‐free flame‐retardants (FRs).

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to investigate the electronics industry's reaction to environmental regulations specifically in terms of lead‐free solders and halogen‐free flame‐retardants (FRs).

Design/methodology/approach

This work achieves its objective by discussing the various international environmental regulations pertaining to electronics manufacturing and relating the industry reactions to those regulations. It also provides the market trends related to lead‐ and halogen‐free products. The electronics industry is pursuing lead‐free solders and halogen‐free FRs, in part due to regulations. However, the paper includes examples of how the industry is successful in implementing environmentally friendly changes.

Findings

The authors compared regulations from Japan, the European Union, the USA, and China. While the regulations themselves vary in scope, industry actions to find alternatives do have common purposes. Electronics manufacturers recognize that environmentally motivated changes are beneficial in terms of waste minimization.

Research limitations/implications

Electronics manufacturers that are interested in green design will benefit from understanding present regulations. They will also benefit from the included examples of product and process improvement for the purpose of environmental compatibility.

Originality/value

This paper derives its perspective from a similar review of literature and company findings that the authors completed in 2006. As refinement of the regulations has continued, the electronics industry has developed improvements in basic materials and processes.

Details

Circuit World, vol. 33 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0305-6120

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Article

Mark Cleveland, Nicolas Papadopoulos and Michel Laroche

The purpose of this paper is to focus on two questions that are especially pertinent to international marketers. Is a strong ethnic identity (EID) generally incompatible…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to focus on two questions that are especially pertinent to international marketers. Is a strong ethnic identity (EID) generally incompatible with a globally‐oriented disposition (cosmopolitanism: COS), and to what extent is the EID‐COS relationship stable across cultures and countries? What roles do EID and COS play on consumer behavior alongside key demographic variables, and how do these relationships vary across countries and across consumption contexts?

Design/methodology/approach

Using a sample of consumers drawn from eight countries, this study identifies and compares bases for international market segmentation. The antecedent roles of EID, COS, and the four demographics variables on the behaviors associated with nine product categories are examined.

Findings

The findings imply that consumers are complementing an identity rooted in their traditional culture with one that is globally‐oriented. The roles played by demographic and psychographic variables varied considerably, not only across product categories, but moreover, across country samples.

Research limitations/implications

The study focuses more on consumer goods and less on intangible services. The sample and sampling approach place some limits on generalizability.

Practical implications

The results provide insights for international managers into when (i.e. product categories) and where (i.e. locations) marketing strategies could be standardized across national frontiers, and when and where these strategies should be customized or “glocalized.”

Originality/value

The paper makes a significant contribution to the international market segmentation literature, demonstrating the variable impact of demographics and identity across consumer behaviors. The findings bolster the notion that many cultures have the innate facility to glocalize, that is, to absorb foreign or global ideas with the best practices and bond these with native customs. The results further imply that globalization takes on many forms throughout the world.

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 28 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

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Article

Sourabh Arora and Sangeeta Sahney

The purpose of this study is to propose an integrated framework utilizing the theory of planned behaviour (TPB) and technology acceptance model (TAM) to augment the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to propose an integrated framework utilizing the theory of planned behaviour (TPB) and technology acceptance model (TAM) to augment the understanding on consumers’ showrooming behaviour.

Design/methodology/approach

Selective sampling was used for data collection. The integrated TAM-TPB framework led to 12 propositions, which were tested using partial least squares-structural equation modelling.

Findings

Both perceived relative search benefits offline and relative purchase benefits online significantly determined the consumers’ showrooming behaviour along with perceived ease purchasing online and the overall usefulness of the showrooming sequence. Results of the study revealed that the showrooming sequence helped consumers avoid the regret of making suboptimal product choices and paying a higher price for the same product. Online trust was found to partially mediate the relationship between consumers’ intention to showrooming and the actual showrooming behaviour.

Research limitations/implications

Notwithstanding the fact that further research is required to arrive at definitive conclusions, this study is an initial move towards understanding the consumers’ showrooming behaviour, and the research provides meaningful insights.

Practical implications

As showrooming substantially erodes profits, devising strategies to defend showrooming customers becomes crucial. The findings of the study provide the basis for formulating strategies to counter showrooming customers.

Originality/value

The paper is amongst the first studies which helps enhance the understanding of consumers’ showrooming behaviour, which is an emerging area in the present multi-channel retailing environment.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 35 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

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