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Book part
Publication date: 25 July 2008

Kenneth F. Hyde

Independent travelers are those vacationers who have booked only a minimum of their transportation and accommodation arrangements prior to departure on the vacation…

Abstract

Independent travelers are those vacationers who have booked only a minimum of their transportation and accommodation arrangements prior to departure on the vacation. Independent travel is an important and growing sector of worldwide tourism. Choice of vacation itinerary for the independent vacation represents a complex series of decisions regarding purchase of multiple leisure and tourism services. This chapter builds and tests a model of independent traveler decision-making for choice of vacation itinerary. The research undertaken employs a two-phase, inductive–deductive case study design. In the deductive phase, the researcher interviewed 20 travel parties vacationing in New Zealand for the first time. The researcher interviewed respondents at both the beginning and the end of their New Zealand vacations. The study compares pre-vacation research and plans, and actual vacation behaviors, on a case-by-case basis. The study examines case study narratives and quantitative measures of crucial variables. The study tests two competing models of independent traveler decision-making, using a pattern-matching procedure. This embedded research design results in high multi-source, multi-method validity for the supported model. The model of the Independent Vacation as Evolving Itinerary suggests that much of the vacation itinerary experienced in independent travel is indeed unplanned, and that a desire to experience the unplanned is a key hedonic motive for independent travel. Rather than following a fixed itinerary, the itinerary of an independent vacation evolves as the vacation proceeds. The independent traveler takes advantage of serendipitous opportunities to experience a number of locations, attractions and activities that they had neither actively researched nor planned.

Details

Advances in Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-522-2

Article
Publication date: 5 October 2021

Young Hoon Kim, Sangyung Lee and Nelson Barber

With dining out increasing globally, policy making and research have been on menu labeling as a source for meaningful nutrition information. Yet, despite attempts to…

Abstract

Purpose

With dining out increasing globally, policy making and research have been on menu labeling as a source for meaningful nutrition information. Yet, despite attempts to mandate menu labeling and the studies examining consumer's perception of menu nutritional information and how this perception impacts dining behavior and intention to consume, concerns for obesity and malnutrition continue to be at the forefront of public health discussions. This study attempts to comprehend consumers' nutritional goals, intention and food choice behavior, thereby suggesting how to leverage this information for change.

Design/methodology/approach

Using survey data and a proposed and validated theoretical model, the study identified the different aspects of consumer's food choice by analyzing the relationship of consumer's perceived importance toward nutrition information, food choice and healthy daily behavior, and intention to improve health.

Findings

Consumers who perceive higher importance of nutrition information are more likely to choose healthy food when dining out and have stronger health improvement intention. The results also suggested healthy food choice and healthy daily behavior positively influenced health improvement intention.

Originality/value

Despite the previous studies on menu labeling and the numerous policy mandates, there is still concern about the food choice behavior of consumers while eating out. No serious effort exists to regulate food service providers similar to the regulation of other consumer products, whereby consumers are generally protected from harm. This study suggests through education, promotional marketing and industry partnerships, motivating and leveraging consumers' desire for healthy food choices could move food service providers and policy makers to change what information is provided.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 124 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 1 March 2022

Arzu Gürdoğan

Introduction: Just as the tourism event begins with the human element, it again ends with the human element. Therefore, the existence, behaviours and attitudes of the

Abstract

Introduction: Just as the tourism event begins with the human element, it again ends with the human element. Therefore, the existence, behaviours and attitudes of the human factor is an issue that should be prioritised much more when compared to other sectors. Consumer behaviour involves certain decisions, activities, ideas or experiences that meet the needs and desires of the consumer. Prior to these actions, consumer behaviour is concerned with all the activities directly related to the attainment, consumption and disposition of the products and services. In this chapter, touristic consumer behaviour, consumer choice and behaviour of the relevant destination, and the management of the destination choice process are presented.

Aim: The chapter aims to reveal how important it is to know the consumer’s destination choice behaviour in both ensuring that the consumer has had a satisfied holiday during the holiday process, and that employers and employees, as service providers, experience the peace and pride of providing a good and quality service. Knowing the behaviour patterns of potential consumers and developing their marketing activities accordingly will provide great convenience to service marketers in the future.

Method: To do this a literature review has been carried out on the issues of destination choice behaviour and tourist travel behaviour.

Result: Tourist behaviour is the most significant indicator or predictor of future tourist behaviour. Considering the social role of the tourist, the behaviour of a tourist can also be an indicator of the behaviour of others. With their behaviours, tourists determine the norms of social behaviour within the context of tourism. These norms are also followed by other consumers such as engaging in tourist behaviour, as well as those who have not travelled yet. Tourist behaviour is the context of the consumer behaviour in the purchasing and abandoning the tourist services.

Implication: The characteristics of the consumer, their past experiences, the level of influence from other consumers, etc. In the future, knowing the behaviour patterns of potential consumers and developing their marketing activities in this direction will provide great convenience to service marketers.

Originality of Study: In the study, it is desired to draw attention to the importance of knowing consumer behaviours in their destination selection. Therefore, this study is thought to be useful in future studies, especially in terms of shedding light on the consumer behaviours and roles that play a role in determining the factors that play a role in destination selection.

Details

Managing Risk and Decision Making in Times of Economic Distress, Part A
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80117-427-5

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 29 November 2018

Michael Christofi, Demetris Vrontis, Erasmia Leonidou and Alkis Thrassou

The purpose of this paper is to construct a conceptual framework of the effects of customer engagement on cause-related marketing (CRM), with the goal of providing a solid…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to construct a conceptual framework of the effects of customer engagement on cause-related marketing (CRM), with the goal of providing a solid scientific foundation for the development and stimulation of future research on the critical intersection of these two topics.

Design/methodology/approach

The research defines customer engagement in CRM campaigns as the conditions under which consumers are allowed to choose the cause that receives the donation, the cause proximity (geographical proximity) and the type of donation in a CRM campaign.

Findings

The paper conceptualizes the role of customer engagement in enhancing the effectiveness of a CRM campaign, in terms of coverage, customization and reduced consumer skepticism, as well as in triggering positive word-of-mouth (WOM) persuasion behaviors.

Practical implications

The conceptual framework provides several practicable directions toward effective control of CRM campaign outcomes, for both local and global firms.

Originality/value

The paper rests on established empirical foundations to develop a comprehensive preliminary multi- disciplinary framework on the subject, setting the path for further research in the fields of CRM, customer engagement and International Business Research, and reaching findings of both scholarly and executive worth.

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 37 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 21 October 2019

Luis Aliaga-Ortega, Cristian Adasme-Berríos, Caren Méndez, Carolina Soto and Berta Schnettler

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the effect of nutritional warning (NW) labels on the behavior of consumers of processed foods, considering demographic and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the effect of nutritional warning (NW) labels on the behavior of consumers of processed foods, considering demographic and psychological factors associated with the theory of planned behavior (TPB).

Design/methodology/approach

The study had a descriptive and cross-sectional design. A survey was applied to 200 household food decision makers from central Chile. This questionnaire was developed based on the planned behavior theory that evaluates the psychological constructs of human behavior: Attitude (ATT), Subjective Norms (SN), Perceived Behavioral Control (PBC) and Purchase Intention (PI) toward processed foods with NW. Sociodemographic variables were also included. The data were analyzed by using a multinomial logit (MNL) model, where three types of categories are established depending on the choice made by the consumer. Thus, the dependent variable responds to the effect of the following probabilities: Eliminate from Consumption, Do Not Eliminate from Consumption and Do Not Know whether or not to eliminate from consumption when selecting a food processed with NW.

Findings

The results show that the implementation of NW has significant effects on the choice of processed foods purchases made by Chilean consumers. Consumers with negative ATT and PBC in the presence of NW on processed foods eliminated this type of food from their consumption. On the other hand, those who did not eliminate processed foods with NW from their consumption made that choice because they had a positive PBC. In addition, consumers who were unsure about eliminating or consuming processed foods with NW also had a positive PBC. In addition, SN and sociodemographic variables did not affect consumer choice.

Practical implications

The results of this study are crucial in informing public policy strategies seeking to alert consumers about the content of processed foods, thus raising awareness for decision making in order to reduce noncommunicable diseases associated with poor eating habits.

Originality/value

The study provides evidence on the effect of NWs for processed foods on consumer decisions based on the TPB.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 121 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 18 September 2019

Ariff Azly Muhamed, Mohd Nizam Ab Rahman, Firdaus Mohd Hamzah, Che Rosmawati Che Mohd Zain and Suhaiza Zailani

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the influence of halal concern as well as emotional and epistemic values on consumer behaviour in the choice and purchase of…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the influence of halal concern as well as emotional and epistemic values on consumer behaviour in the choice and purchase of halal-certified food supplies.

Design/methodology/approach

This study used a quantitative methodology of convenience sampling to collect survey data from 1,550 Muslim respondents in Malaysia. It also employed multiple regressions by covariance-based structural equation modelling in the data analysis as well as in the validation of the proposed model.

Findings

The empirical results showed that the importance of halal certification had the highest impact on consumer choice behaviour, particularly in the purchase of halal-certified food supplies. Also, epistemic and emotional values were both statistically significant in terms of their influence on the consumer decision-making process.

Research limitations/implications

The results emphasize the importance of enhancing the hedonic (halal concern and emotional value) aspect as a way for the halal food industries to obtain an added value advantage for their products and services.

Originality/value

This paper is the first to employ an empirical approach to consider the halal sentiment as a determinant of consumer purchasing behaviour in the context of halal-certified food supplies.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 121 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 October 1987

Luiz Moutinho

The analysis of consumer behaviour requires the consideration of various processes internal and external to the individual. To understand behaviour, it is necessary to…

22432

Abstract

The analysis of consumer behaviour requires the consideration of various processes internal and external to the individual. To understand behaviour, it is necessary to examine the complex interaction of many influencing elements. This study deals with determinants of behaviour, culture and reference group influences, the relationships between individuals and their environments, perceived risks, and family decision processes. It concludes with an illustration of tourist behaviour modelling.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 21 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 7 June 2016

Henri Kuokkanen and William Sun

Many consumer-focused corporate social responsibility (CSR) studies suggest a positive link between the responsibility demonstrated by a company and consumers’ intention…

Abstract

Purpose

Many consumer-focused corporate social responsibility (CSR) studies suggest a positive link between the responsibility demonstrated by a company and consumers’ intention to favor the company in their purchases. Yet an analogous causal effect between corporate social and financial performances is not evident. This chapter conceptualizes how social desirability and cynicism contribute to the discrepancy between consumers’ attitudes and their actual purchase behavior, and analyzes why consumer choices indicated in surveys do not consistently convert into actions.

Methodology/approach

We develop a conceptual framework based on hybrid choice modeling to estimate the impact of two new variables, Corporate Social Desirability and Corporate Social Cynicism, on CSR research. The model presented synthesizes research findings from the fields of CSR and psychology with a discrete choice methodology that allows inclusion of psychological aspects as latent variables.

Findings

The goal of the framework is to bridge the gap between choices stated by consumers in CSR surveys and their actual choices by quantifying and extracting the effects of biases that otherwise threaten the validity of such survey results. As the next step, the practical value of the model must be evaluated through empirical research combining a CSR choice study with social desirability and cynicism measurement.

Originality

The framework proposes a novel way of controlling CSR surveys for potential biases created by social desirability and cynicism and enables quantification of this impact, with potential application to other fields where psychological aspects may distort research results. Future empirical evidence based on the framework may also offer new insights into the mechanisms by which the two biases distort findings.

Abstract

Details

Review of Marketing Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-726-1

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1999

Michelle Rasmussen and Larry Lockshin

As Australia embarks on the new millennium, marketers must understand the basis of consumer choice, both domestically and internationally. Generally, brands are becoming…

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Abstract

As Australia embarks on the new millennium, marketers must understand the basis of consumer choice, both domestically and internationally. Generally, brands are becoming globalised (Boze and Patton, 1995), but the wine industry provides an interesting example of global branding in the context of a plethora of brand names. In Australia alone, over one thousand wine companies produce over 16,000 wine brands (Spawton, 1998). This array of wine product creates a complex marketplace, which causes consumers great difficulty when making a purchase decision (Greatorex and Mitchell, 1988). To combat this problem, wine companies have been using branding as a means of differentiating their product (Lockshin, 1997). The introduction of geographical indicators (registered names for specific regions of origin) has spurred on the use of regional branding as a branding tool. This research is being conducted to clarify the effect of regional branding on consumer choice behaviour. The results from the qualitative research stage highlighted the fact that a small number of consumers used regional branding as a cue in their choice decision. These consumers generally had higher perceived knowledge of wine, greatly enjoyed purchasing wine and spent a longer time in the wine retail outlet than other consumer groups. A quantitative study will now be conducted to clarify which consumer groups use regional branding as part of the choice process and to determine the importance of a company's brand and price used in consumers' choice process. As wine is not the only product branded by its region of origin, this research will be beneficial to other product categories such as cheese, seafood and olive oil (Belk King, 1997).

Details

International Journal of Wine Marketing, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-7541

Keywords

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