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Article
Publication date: 27 May 2014

Abdel-Aziz Ahmad Sharabati, Hamzeh Salim Khraim and Rami Atta Khateeb

– The purpose of the study is to investigate the influence of direct-to-consumer advertising (DTCA) on consumers’ decision-making (CDM).

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the study is to investigate the influence of direct-to-consumer advertising (DTCA) on consumers’ decision-making (CDM).

Design/methodology/approach

Practical data were used in the empirical analysis collected from 484 consumer surveyed by means of a questionnaire. Statistical techniques such as descriptive statistics, correlation, simple and multiple regressions were employed. A Cronbach’s alpha was used to confirm the suitability of the data collection instrument.

Findings

The results of the study indicated a positive significant relationship between DTCA and CDM. The results indicated that there was significant impact of healthcare awareness on CDM, but there were no significant impacts of drug–drug interactions, medical information source and consumer economical situation on CDM.

Research limitations/implications

The data are also limited to a Jordanian market; therefore, generalizing results of a Jordanian setting to other countries may be questionable. Extending the analyses to other settings represent future research opportunities.

Originality/value

The current research may be considered as an initiative study that highlights the effect of DTCA on CDM in Jordan and in the Arab world. The results can provide the reference for further research about the relationship between DTCA and CDM.

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1990

Roger J. Sandilands

Allyn Young′s lectures, as recorded by the young Nicholas Kaldor,survey the historical roots of the subject from Aristotle through to themodern neo‐classical writers. The…

Abstract

Allyn Young′s lectures, as recorded by the young Nicholas Kaldor, survey the historical roots of the subject from Aristotle through to the modern neo‐classical writers. The focus throughout is on the conditions making for economic progress, with stress on the institutional developments that extend and are extended by the size of the market. Organisational changes that promote the division of labour and specialisation within and between firms and industries, and which promote competition and mobility, are seen as the vital factors in growth. In the absence of new markets, inventions as such play only a minor role. The economic system is an inter‐related whole, or a living “organon”. It is from this perspective that micro‐economic relations are analysed, and this helps expose certain fallacies of composition associated with the marginal productivity theory of production and distribution. Factors are paid not because they are productive but because they are scarce. Likewise he shows why Marshallian supply and demand schedules, based on the “one thing at a time” approach, cannot adequately describe the dynamic growth properties of the system. Supply and demand cannot be simply integrated to arrive at a picture of the whole economy. These notes are complemented by eleven articles in the Encyclopaedia Britannica which were published shortly after Young′s sudden death in 1929.

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Journal of Economic Studies, vol. 17 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3585

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Book part
Publication date: 30 July 2018

Abstract

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Marketing Management in Turkey
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-558-0

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1978

The Equal Pay Act 1970 (which came into operation on 29 December 1975) provides for an “equality clause” to be written into all contracts of employment. S.1(2) (a) of the…

Abstract

The Equal Pay Act 1970 (which came into operation on 29 December 1975) provides for an “equality clause” to be written into all contracts of employment. S.1(2) (a) of the 1970 Act (which has been amended by the Sex Discrimination Act 1975) provides:

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Managerial Law, vol. 21 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2003

Georgios I. Zekos

Aim of the present monograph is the economic analysis of the role of MNEs regarding globalisation and digital economy and in parallel there is a reference and examination…

Abstract

Aim of the present monograph is the economic analysis of the role of MNEs regarding globalisation and digital economy and in parallel there is a reference and examination of some legal aspects concerning MNEs, cyberspace and e‐commerce as the means of expression of the digital economy. The whole effort of the author is focused on the examination of various aspects of MNEs and their impact upon globalisation and vice versa and how and if we are moving towards a global digital economy.

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Managerial Law, vol. 45 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 1995

Gordon R. Foxall

Methodological pluralism in consumer research is usually confinedto post‐positivist interpretive approaches. Argues, however, that apositivistic stance, radical…

Abstract

Methodological pluralism in consumer research is usually confined to post‐positivist interpretive approaches. Argues, however, that a positivistic stance, radical behaviourism, can enrich epistemological debate among researchers with the recognition of radical behaviourism′s ultimate reliance on interpretation as well as science. Although radical behaviourist explanation was initially founded on Machian positivism, its account of complex social behaviours such as purchase and consumption is necessarily interpretive, inviting comparison with the hermeneutical approaches currently emerging in consumer research. Radical behaviourist interpretation attributes meaning to behaviour by identifying its environmental determinants, especially the learning history of the individual in relation to the consequences similar prior behaviour has effected. The nature of such interpretation is demonstrated for purchase and consumption responses by means of a critique of radical behaviourism as applied to complex human activity. In the process, develops and applies a framework for radical behaviourist interpretation of purchase and consumption to four operant equifinality classes of consumer behaviour: accomplishment, pleasure, accumulation and maintenance. Some epistemological implications of this framework, the behavioural perspective model (BPM) of purchase and consumption, are discussed in the context of the relativity and incommensurability of research paradigms. Finally, evaluates the interpretive approach, particularly in terms of its relevance to the nature and understanding of managerial marketing.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 29 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 11 November 2013

Hanna Ehrnrooth and Christian Gronroos

– The article aims to explore hybrid consumption behaviour as an emergent consumption pattern that may make conventional consumer stereotypes outdated.

Abstract

Purpose

The article aims to explore hybrid consumption behaviour as an emergent consumption pattern that may make conventional consumer stereotypes outdated.

Design/methodology/approach

The study is an exploratory study in urban environments using qualitative, semi-structured and semi-structured interviews.

Findings

It is found that a continuum of hybrid consumption types exists, which includes both omnivorous and polarised behaviour. Hybrid consumers opt for both premium and budget alternatives but ignore midrange alternatives. Both trading-up and trading-down categories and situations are identified. While in previous studies trading up and trading down have been considered product category specific, the results of this study imply that hybrid consumption transcends product category boundaries. Four key themes characterizing hybrid consumption are identified.

Research limitations/implications

The study is explorative. However, as the phenomenon of hybrid consumption behaviour is insufficiently studied in previous research, the article reveals underpinning drivers of such behaviour and suggests directions of further research into the phenomenon.

Practical implications

There are many practical implications of the study. As hybrid consumers do not fall into distinct and stable categories, traditional marketing and segmentation strategies may need to be rethought. Consumers cannot be categorised in such a straightforward manner as conventional segmentation practices suggest.

Originality/value

The authors are not aware of hybrid consumption having been studied and categorised in this way before in academic research. New approaches to studying consumer behaviour, segmentation and marketing are implied.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 51 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Abstract

The paper published below was prepared by Taylor Ostrander for Frank Knight’s course, Economic Theory, Economics 301, during the Fall 1933 quarter.

Details

Documents from F. Taylor Ostrander
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-165-1

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Article
Publication date: 22 May 2007

Gianni Betti, Neil Dourmashkin, Mariacristina Rossi and Ya Ping Yin

This paper seeks to measure and characterise the extent of consumer over‐indebtedness among the European Union (EU) member states.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to measure and characterise the extent of consumer over‐indebtedness among the European Union (EU) member states.

Design/methodology/approach

The study evaluates alternative measures of over‐indebtedness on the basis of the permanent‐income/life‐cycle theories of consumption behaviour and adopts a subjective approach in identifying over‐indebted households on the basis of European household survey data. It then investigates the main characteristics of over‐indebted households.

Findings

The empirical results reveal that over‐indebtedness was a significant problem across EU member states in the mid‐1990s. Moreover, an inverse relationship emerged between the extent of the over‐indebtedness problem and the extent of consumer borrowing across EU countries.

Research limitations/implications

Anecdotal evidence seemed to suggest that some main factors behind over‐indebtedness could be “market failure” on the credit market, the existence of liquidity constraints and lack of access to formal credit markets. However, a comprehensive and rigorous investigation of the extent and determinants of over‐indebtedness can only be achieved through analysis of more extended household data sets, particularly panel data.

Practical implications

The EU credit markets exhibited certain symptoms of “market failure”, on the one hand, and there was also need for further financial liberalisation in the Southern European countries, on the other hand.

Originality/value

The paper provides a first systematic evaluation of existing measures of consumer over‐indebtedness as well as the first EU‐wide empirical investigation of the problem. It should provide valuable information to the credit industry as well as financial regulatory bodies.

Details

Journal of Economic Studies, vol. 34 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3585

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2011

Nada Nasr Bechwati

The purpose of this research is to build a model to help understand consumers' willingness to pay (WTP) for professional services. In this paper, professional services are…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research is to build a model to help understand consumers' willingness to pay (WTP) for professional services. In this paper, professional services are services where, in general, consumers have the choice of doing the work themselves or outsourcing them such as apparel care, landscaping and tax forms preparation.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper proposes a regression model to predict WTP. The model includes a set of independent behavioral variables such as subjective knowledge, job anxiety, enjoyment and appreciation of leisure activities. Data from two cross‐sectional surveys completed by 488 and 479 consumers are used to test the proposed model.

Findings

The findings support the importance of behavioral variables as determinants of consumers' WTP for professional services.

Practical implications

Understanding which behavioral variables predict consumers' WTP for professional services provides insightful implications. The findings imply that, to increase WTP for professional services, service providers may consider stressing in their promotional messages how much better the outcome is when they (versus consumers) produce the service, and making the importance of leisure activities and the related value of time more salient to consumers.

Originality/value

Unlike previous models, designed to measure WTP and which focus on demographic and economic variables, this model introduces a set of behavioral variables. The findings support the importance of these variables in predicting WTP.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 20 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

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