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Article

Sam Fullerton, Roger Brooksbank and Larry Neale

Marketers are increasingly spoilt for choice as to which emerging technology to use for the purpose of enhancing their company’s competitive advantage. Accordingly, there…

Abstract

Purpose

Marketers are increasingly spoilt for choice as to which emerging technology to use for the purpose of enhancing their company’s competitive advantage. Accordingly, there is an inherent need to assess, relative to the task of accomplishing an organization’s marketing goals, the levels of consumer-perceived effectiveness germane to these options. Based on grounded theory, this study aims to develop an appropriate measurement instrument.

Design/methodology/approach

Research is based on a survey featuring a cross-section of 18 technology-based initiatives that are being routinely incorporated within many companies’ marketing strategies. A sample of 967 adult residents of the USA provided their perspective on the effectiveness of each initiative as a mainstream marketing tool.

Findings

A wide spectrum of opinions exists as to what constitutes an effective initiative. Three sub-dimensions of the consumer-perceived effectiveness construct were identified and validated as measurement scales for use in future research: involvement stealth and outreach.

Research limitations/implications

The generalization of the findings may be limited because minority segments of the adult American population, specifically, African Americans and Asian Americans were somewhat under-represented in the sample. Likewise, younger and older segments were slightly under- and over-represented, respectively.

Practical implications

The study findings can be used to aid in the further development of an instrument designed to measure the strength and directionality of consumer-perceived marketing effectiveness. With the specter of an increasing array of technology-based strategic options going forward, using such an instrument will no doubt become a critically important success factor among business-to-customer (B2C) organizations.

Originality/value

Few studies to date have sought to understand consumer perspectives regarding the effectiveness of technology-based initiatives as marketing tools, and none have explored the relativities of such perceptions across an array of different initiatives or examined any latent sub-dimensions of the construct. This study addresses these deficiencies.

Details

European Business Review, vol. 31 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-534X

Keywords

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Book part

Nayyer Naseem, Swati Verma and Attila Yaprak

The purpose of this paper is to shed light on the interplay between selected consumer behavior constructs and their individual and joint influences on purchase intentions…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to shed light on the interplay between selected consumer behavior constructs and their individual and joint influences on purchase intentions of global, local, and hybrid brands. This is a topic that is becoming increasingly important as the world moves toward global economic interdependence and increasingly more firms expand abroad.

Methodology/findings

As the paper is in its conceptual/modeling phase, its research design is not yet complete, nor does it offer any findings. Resting our work on attitude and identity theories, we derive hypotheses about the potential influence of consumer behavior constructs, that is, the levels of the consumer’s global consumption orientation, globalization attitude, consumer ethnocentrism, and consumer cosmopolitanism on global brand attitude and its influence on willingness to purchase global versus nonglobal brands. We also derive hypotheses about influences that might moderate this relationship; specifically the consumer’s affinity with the home country of the particular brand, and the perceived value embedded in the brand.

Research/practical/social implications

Our work will contribute to the expanding literature on global consumer culture and consumption patterns and will thus provide valuable insights for international marketing managers and for social policy.

Originality/value

Our work will examine the joint influences of several consumer behavior constructs on brand purchase behavior, in addition to the independent influences of these constructs. It will also explore the possible mediating influence of global brand attitude on purchase intentions and moderating effects, if any, of perceived value and consumer affinity on consumers’ choices of global over local and hybrid brands.

Details

International Marketing in the Fast Changing World
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-233-7

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Article

L.W. Turley and Douglas L. Fugate

Notes how service encounters have tended to be viewed as aninteraction between service providers and service customers. Examinessituations where the main encounter is the…

Abstract

Notes how service encounters have tended to be viewed as an interaction between service providers and service customers. Examines situations where the main encounter is the interaction between the facility and the customer. Considers different perspectives for planning service facilities – operational, locational, atmospheric/image, consumer use, contact personnel. Argues that congruent facilities are those that can succeed in integrating these competing perspectives.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

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Article

Emerson Wagner Mainardes, Atílio Peixoto Soares Júnior and Daniel Modenesi Andrade

The purpose of this paper is threefold: first, to identify the influence of brand equity (BE) of commoditized products of famous brand on purchase intention and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is threefold: first, to identify the influence of brand equity (BE) of commoditized products of famous brand on purchase intention and willingness to pay a premium price in an emerging market; second, to identify the relationship between the BE of these products and their antecedents; and third, to identify the influence of subjective norms on purchase intention and BE. Commoditized products are bought due to necessity and not desire, are homogeneous, produced on a large scale, and have low added value.

Design/methodology/approach

A theoretical model is proposed contemplating the constructs: BE, purchase intention, premium price, perceived quality, brand recall, perceived value and subjective norms. We performed a quantitative study with 432 respondents. We used questionnaires, and we analyzed the data using the structural equation modeling with partial least squares.

Findings

The results indicate a positive relationship between BE and purchase intention, BE and premium price, perceived value and BE, subjective norms and purchase intention and subjective norms and BE. It should be noted that an emerging market has characteristics distinct to that of a mature market, justifying specific research in this context.

Originality/value

The study brought a theoretical model relating antecedents and consequents of BE in the segment of commoditized products. Furthermore, it indicated the strength of the brand of the commoditized products in an emerging market scenario.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 38 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

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Article

Maria Elena Latino, Marta Menegoli and Angelo Corallo

The purpose of this paper is to identify the main research fields concerning food label designs and build a topic overview. To this end, the literature review method was chosen.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify the main research fields concerning food label designs and build a topic overview. To this end, the literature review method was chosen.

Design/methodology/approach

A sample of 121 papers was identified and analyzed using bibliometric analysis. Journals, articles, authors of the sample and the term co-occurrence map, which represents the recurring themes and organizes them in clusters, were defined. To recognize the main research fields, starting from analyzing the terms that compose each cluster, the results were discussed in a focus group composed of five experts.

Findings

Food labelling theories are distinctly related to eight research fields: consumer behaviour analysis, consumer willingness evaluation, consumer product evaluation, nutrition and health, daily foodstuff and meal effects, food industry and related products, impacts on market and society and child nutrition.

Research limitations/implications

Several stakeholders could be interested in the results of this paper. Food companies could identify the best practices in food labelling theories to improve their products and labels. Governments could understand how social policies are acknowledged by consumers and how to create new policies. Researchers could identify new issues to investigate. The results could also facilitate bibliographical referencing for those who approach this topic for the first time.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, studies on food label theories explore the themes from the consumer’s perspective. The authors’ study, in contrast, focused on recognizing the research fields where food label designs are addressed.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 122 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

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Article

Sharyn Rundle‐Thiele

Loyalty has been widely researched and while we know the ways that consumers demonstrate their loyalty and the factors that influence loyalty, research reporting consumer…

Abstract

Purpose

Loyalty has been widely researched and while we know the ways that consumers demonstrate their loyalty and the factors that influence loyalty, research reporting consumer and marketer views of loyalty is scant. To date there has been no attempt to compare and contrast marketer's views on loyalty with their own consumers' views. The purpose of this paper is to report research that responds to this omission.

Design/methodology/approach

An Australian beer category was selected for this research because beer is a category where consumer loyalty exists. A qualitative research approach was used to provide detailed marketer and consumer views about loyalty to gain strategic insight. Company documents were also used to gain additional insight and increase the validity of the research findings.

Findings

A detailed view suggests that many marketing initiatives employed are eroding rather than contributing to consumer loyalty. Consumer views suggest that loyalty must be earned and that a consumers' loyalty cannot be bought.

Research limitations

A single case study was used in this research to provide rich and detailed insight into consumer loyalty. Further research is needed to test the validity of the research findings by using a larger sample of consumers, but also in other beer categories and product and service categories.

Practical implications/implications

Practices where companies profit at the expense of their own consumers will diminish rather than build consumer loyalty. Marketers must consider loyalty as a reciprocal concept. This research suggests that to gain a consumers loyalty a company must adopt “a look after me and I will look after you” philosophy.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 23 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

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Article

Cleopatra Veloutsou, George Christodoulides and Leslie de Chernatony

The purpose of this paper is to identify the components of consumer‐based brand equity from the perspective of experts in brand management in the UK, Germany and Greece.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify the components of consumer‐based brand equity from the perspective of experts in brand management in the UK, Germany and Greece.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from semi‐structured interviews with senior brand consultants and managers, five in the UK, five in Germany and five in Greece.

Findings

The findings suggested four categories of measures which can be used to define brand equity. These are the consumers' understanding of brand characteristics; consumers' brand evaluation; consumers' affective response towards the brand; and consumers' behaviour towards the brand. Specific dimensions are identified as indicators of each category.

Research limitations/implications

Although the focus of this study is Europe, data were only collected from the UK, Germany and Greece, countries representing three of the five European cultural clusters. The resultant taxonomy adds to the fragmented literature on brand equity measurement by proposing four categories to gauge brand equity.

Practical implications

The suggested taxonomy provides indicators of a framework managers could use when assessing brand equity.

Originality/value

There is little agreement on what constitutes brand equity and therefore measures of brand equity are fragmented. To date, the views of practicing managers have not been taken into account in research. This paper draws on the views of practitioners and academics to suggest a taxonomy of categories of measures for brand equity.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 22 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

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Article

Jisun Lee and Lana Chung

The purpose of this paper is to empirically analyze how brand authenticity (BA) as perceived by consumers who take health functional foods (HFF) strengthen the brand…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to empirically analyze how brand authenticity (BA) as perceived by consumers who take health functional foods (HFF) strengthen the brand relationship quality (BRQ) and positively affects brand loyalty.

Design/methodology/approach

The five sub-dimensions of BA perceived by HFF consumers, elicited through a focus group interview, were conceptualized as a second-order reflective construct. To identify the influences of the sub-dimensions of BA on each construct of the BRQ and the influence on brand loyalty though mediating BRQ, an empirical analysis was done using partial least squares-based structural equation modeling.

Findings

All the sub-dimensions of BA positively affect each of the BRQ s (brand satisfaction, brand trust and brand commitment) excepting product authenticity on brand commitment, and originality on brand trust. The impact of BA positively affects brand loyalty by mediating brand relationship qualities.

Originality/value

It is found that BA is an important antecedent for forming BRQ with consumers in the HFF industry, in which building trust with consumers is important. BA is an important factor in brand management of HFF.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 122 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

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Article

Arunima Rana, Anil Bhat and Leela Rani

The purpose of the paper is to systematically review and summarize the literature addressing various sources of online brand equity. The evolution of social media, online…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the paper is to systematically review and summarize the literature addressing various sources of online brand equity. The evolution of social media, online forums and virtual communities drive the diversity in nomenclature of online marketing variables. Different researchers have used different marketing variables to indicate the same source of online brand equity. The definitions of the marketing variables change with the change in context, due to the complex e-commerce environment. The marketing variables used in different studies have lead to a conceptual overlap and repetitiveness.

Design/methodology/approach

This confusion is sought to be classified by the proposed classificatory scheme that used content analysis of 42 previous studies. The definitions of the antecedents of sources of the online brand equity used by the authors are analyzed with the help of content analysis to summarize the marketing variables in a meaningful way.

Findings

The paper identifies 15 major marketing variables by authors in their studies related to various sources of online brand equity. The final list contains 13 frequently used variables which also comprises variables which are evolving due to the dynamic e-commerce environment like the feeling of “virtual-real”.

Practical implications

The variables identified can be used by the businesses as a check list to their marketing activities.

Originality/value

This is the first paper which identifies and clarifies the ambiguity present in the application of the various online marketing variables.

Details

Journal of Research in Interactive Marketing, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7122

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Article

Andreas Buttimer

The purpose of the paper is to demonstrate how a generic value chain and customer focused system as demonstrated by the Scottish and Irish breast screening programmes can…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the paper is to demonstrate how a generic value chain and customer focused system as demonstrated by the Scottish and Irish breast screening programmes can be used to provide a high quality health service.

Design/methodology/approach

Literature relevant to aligning the entire operating model – the companies' culture, business processes, management systems to serve one value discipline, i.e. customer intimacy, is reviewed and considered in the context of the NHS Scottish Breast Screening Programme in Edinburgh and BreastCheck – the National Breast Screening Programme in Ireland.

Findings

This paper demonstrates how an emphasis on customer focus and operational excellence, as used in other service industries, can help to provide a better health service. It uses the Scottish and Irish breast screening programmes as illustrative examples. The paper applies the key requirements in the delivery of a quality service including an understanding of the characteristics of a service industry, the management of discontinuities involved in its delivery and the environment in which it operates.

Originality/value

System failure is commonly the cause of quality failure in the health system. Breast screening programmes are designed to prevent such a failure. This paper promotes and describes the use of the generic value chain by using the knowledge gained in delivering a mammography‐screening programme.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 22 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

Keywords

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