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Book part

Matt Bower

This chapter critically examines the implications of different pedagogical perspectives, approaches, and strategies for the design and implementation of…

Abstract

This chapter critically examines the implications of different pedagogical perspectives, approaches, and strategies for the design and implementation of technology-enhanced learning. The key tenets of different pedagogical perspectives are unpacked, including behaviorism, cognitivism, constructivism, socio-constructivism, and connectivism, with reference to how technology can be used to instantiate them. A range of different pedagogical approaches, including collaborative learning, problem-based learning, inquiry-based learning, constructionist learning, design-based learning, and games-based learning are discussed in relation to the use of technology and the previously identified pedagogical perspectives. Pedagogical strategies at a more instantaneous level are also considered, as are the goals of technology-enhanced learning in terms of promoting authentic and meaningful learning. The critical role of the teacher when applying pedagogies using technology, as well as associated issues, are discussed throughout.

Details

Design of Technology-Enhanced Learning
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-183-4

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Article

David Porcaro

Many educators have advocated constructivist‐based pedagogies as a way to develop the skills needed in knowledge societies. However, many countries have a tradition of…

Abstract

Purpose

Many educators have advocated constructivist‐based pedagogies as a way to develop the skills needed in knowledge societies. However, many countries have a tradition of instructivist‐based practices, which rely on didactic lectures, rote memorization and high‐stakes exams. The purpose of this paper is to conceptualize the reactions to constructivist‐based pedagogy in instructivist‐based learning cultures.

Design/methodology/approach

The author employs a literature review to compare the philosophical and pedagogical differences between constructivism and instructivism, and proposes a conceptual model for introducing constructivist‐based pedagogies into instructivist learning cultures.

Findings

The needs of teachers, students, and institutions intersect during pedagogical innovations, which take place within national systems. The alignment between students' and teachers' educational philosophies, as well as an institutional system's resources, policy, and culture can bring conflict or congruence, as teachers, students, administrators and other stakeholders dismiss, adapt, ignore or celebrate the (mis)alignment.

Originality/value

The model described in this paper is intended to serve as a guide for educators who are introducing innovative pedagogies in a variety of settings, and will continued to be validated through a design‐research study in Oman.

Details

Multicultural Education & Technology Journal, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-497X

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Article

Olga Dziubaniuk and Monica Nyholm

This paper aims to explore methods of teaching sustainability and business ethics, relevant to the modern demand for student’s skills and knowledge. The study explores the…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore methods of teaching sustainability and business ethics, relevant to the modern demand for student’s skills and knowledge. The study explores the challenges of teaching a business school undergraduate-level course and argues that a constructivist pedagogy is a suitable epistemological approach for designing a course unit concerning sustainability and ethics.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper presents case study findings drawn upon course feedback and course reflections aimed at making sense of what the most effective pedagogic approaches were that influenced students’ learning.

Findings

Results indicate that students appreciate active forms of learning via practical assignments and discussions. As knowledge of sustainability and business ethics is important for the student’s future career path, students need to develop skills of applying conceptual knowledge to practice via constructive pedagogical methods.

Practical implications

This empirical study contributes to the literature of constructivist pedagogics, which is explored in the context of sustainable development and business ethics teaching. Practically, it contributes to the analysis of teaching methods and frameworks applied in the course emphasizing the necessity of engaging in interactive and personalized learning and teaching processes.

Originality/value

Issues of teaching ethics and sustainable development are known concerns, but they have to be addressed systematically because of the changing business environment. This study explores the constructivist pedagogy based on empirical evidence and highlights its value in the educational process.

Details

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. 22 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

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Article

Frank Wai‐ming Tam

Previous research on pedagogical reforms has seldom looked at how reform may contribute to aggression in school organizations. The purpose of this paper is to hypothesize…

Abstract

Purpose

Previous research on pedagogical reforms has seldom looked at how reform may contribute to aggression in school organizations. The purpose of this paper is to hypothesize that teachers’ disengagement from school mediates the tendency for teachers to manifest aggression when they are implementing pedagogical reform in school. Behind this hypothesis is the assumption that people are bound to encounter obstacles when implementing changes, and the resultant frustration can easily grow into feelings of disengagement and aggression which block the changes.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 845 teachers in 30 secondary schools in Hong Kong were surveyed and path analysis employed to look at how constraint in an organization and feeling of disengagement within the school hampers the successful implementation of reform towards constructivist pedagogy.

Findings

Results of the study suggest that feelings of disengagement amplify the negative impact of instructional change and cause aggressive impulses within the school to intensify, but support from school can significantly reduce the feelings of disengagement and constraint experienced by teachers. Findings of the study contribute to a deeper understanding of the dynamics of change and its impacts on school organizations.

Originality/value

Although some studies have looked at workplace aggression in a school setting, there is no work being done to look at how mandated school reform contributes to workplace aggression.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 27 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

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Article

Vicki A. Hosek and Lara J. Handsfield

The purpose of this study was to examine teacher decisions surrounding opportunities for student voice, experiences and beliefs in digital classroom communities. The…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study was to examine teacher decisions surrounding opportunities for student voice, experiences and beliefs in digital classroom communities. The teachers’ decisions reflect monologic rather than dialogic teacher pedagogies which prompted the authors to ask the following question: What led to these teacher-centered practices in digital environments?

Design/methodology/approach

Authoritative discourses in school policies and a missing connection between critical pedagogies and teachers’ technology practices are examined in light of teachers’ decisions to engage in monologic and/or dialogic teaching practices. The authors propose professional development and research that emphasize pedagogy that supports student voice as foundational to practices involving digital literacies.

Findings

Examination of the teachers’ decisions showed monologic practices void of student opportunities to critically engage in digital environments. Dominant discourses imposed through protectionist and digital citizenship policies of schools as well as lack of opportunity through professional development to connect critical pedagogy to technology impacted the teachers’ decisions.

Originality/value

Current research surrounding teachers’ digital literacies uses the TPACK framework to examine technology integration practices. Missing is a critical component that addresses and works to dismantle the dominant discourses and power structures in digital communities (Author, 2018). The authors build on research in critical digital literacies to argue for adding the critical missing “C” into the TPACK framework (C-TPACK) to move researchers and educators to consider pedagogies that examine ideologies at work in digital communities to provide opportunities for student voice.

Details

English Teaching: Practice & Critique, vol. 19 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1175-8708

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Article

Matthias Pepin and Etienne St-Jean

Many countries around the world have now introduced entrepreneurship into their curricula and educational practices, starting at the elementary school level. However…

Abstract

Purpose

Many countries around the world have now introduced entrepreneurship into their curricula and educational practices, starting at the elementary school level. However, recent studies show the relative (un)effectiveness of K-12 enterprise education on diverse learning outcomes. The purpose of this paper is to report on a research aimed at assessing the impacts of enterprise education on students’ entrepreneurial attitudes.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors conducted a quasi-experiment between May and June 2017 to assess the entrepreneurial potential of students at Elementary Cycle 3 (10–12 years) in Quebec, Canada. Relying on attitude theory, the authors used Athayde’s Attitudes toward Enterprise for Young People test, which assesses students’ entrepreneurial potential through four entrepreneurial attitudes (leadership, creativity, achievement and personal control). The experimental group consisted of 11 classes which had conducted an entrepreneurial project during the 2016–2017 school year (n = 208 students), while the 7 classes of the control group had not (n=151 students).

Findings

At first glance, data showed no difference between the two groups. Further investigation showed that private and Freinet (public) schools’ students, both from the control group, show significantly higher leadership scores than those of the experimental group. In-depth analyses also show that increasing the number of entrepreneurial projects significantly impacted three of the four attitudes assessed, although negligibly.

Research limitations/implications

Taken together, those results question the relevance of single entrepreneurial activities in developing students’ entrepreneurial attitudes. They also suggest the positive impact of a progressive, constructivist pedagogy in developing such entrepreneurial attitudes. Moreover, the paper raises several factors likely to impact students’ entrepreneurial attitudes for further research.

Originality/value

K-12 enterprise education remains an understudied context, largely crossed by unproven statements. This research contributes to understand and give direction to educational initiatives targeting the development of young students’ entrepreneurial attitudes.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 26 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

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Book part

Barbara Monroe

Asynchronous communication technologies (ACT), such as email, listservs, and online discussions, have been slow to catch on in K-12 classrooms. Not coincidentally, these…

Abstract

Asynchronous communication technologies (ACT), such as email, listservs, and online discussions, have been slow to catch on in K-12 classrooms. Not coincidentally, these are potentially the most transformative of all technologies and the ones most difficult to integrate into a traditional classroom. Teacher training, technical support, and access do not really explain this glaring exclusion. The theoretical standpoint of social informatics– or the ecology of technology and social systems– gives us a productive way of understanding technology's impact– or lack thereof – in school settings. More specifically, the individual/organizational, institutional, national, and societal contexts impede or propel technological integration in any given setting. In light of these contexts, one teacher's successful integration practices are examined. While teachers can effect change in their own classrooms, only administrators can truly effect systemic change, ironically working from the grass-roots up, as one district success story illustrates.

Details

Technology and Education: Issues in Administration, Policy, and Applications in K12 Schools
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-280-1

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Article

Mary M. Somerville, Malia E. Huston and Anita Mirijamdotter

To report the outcomes of an organizational change project at California Polytechnic State University in San Luis Obispo, California, USA. Interactive planning and systems…

Abstract

Purpose

To report the outcomes of an organizational change project at California Polytechnic State University in San Luis Obispo, California, USA. Interactive planning and systems thinking provide a robust foundation for rethinking workplace activities, so as to prepare staff members for enhanced participation in an increasingly digital information environment.

Design/methodology/approach

The methodology takes the form of a case study.

Findings

Organizational development tools activate and extend participants' knowledge, skills, and abilities through purposeful dialogue that cultivates holistic perspectives. Enhanced appreciation of campus constituencies' differing needs and preferences, complimented by ongoing user‐focused data collection and analysis, informs strategic systems and services redesign. This practice serves to promote continuous learning, even as it advances the organization's digital migration. Results‐to‐date suggest the efficacy of this staff development approach, which uses constructivist “building on what we know” learning strategies to develop nimble organizational responsiveness, amidst dynamically changing external circumstances.

Originality/value

Provides information on a staff development approach.

Details

The Electronic Library, vol. 23 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

Keywords

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Book part

Rohit Setty

The focus and goal of this chapter is to systematically detail how the “cascade” system is organized and how it operates by coordinating current research. To do so, this…

Abstract

The focus and goal of this chapter is to systematically detail how the “cascade” system is organized and how it operates by coordinating current research. To do so, this chapter first builds an understanding of the historical conditions that forged the “cascade” system, then turns to how the system operates – charting its affordances and limitations through others’ research – and then discusses what opportunities can be leveraged to support teachers’ work. In doing so, this chapter provides relevant information and documentation about the “cascade” system so that readers can understand how this system currently works and what is possible. Two interpretations are made from the analysis of current research. First, the “cascade” is overwrought with voices, and the participants overwhelmed; and second, the “cascade” fosters an untenable view of how people learn and what constitutes teaching. Increasingly, teachers and their education are being widely recognized as central to the fortunes of schoolchildren. In India, a significant amount of attention is being paid to teacher education more than ever before. For example, the recent 5-year planning and operations budget is being touted as the “Teacher Education Plan.” Thus, probing the existing system and its norms and practices is vital to ensuring this attention isn’t frittered away and is put toward helping teachers step up to the challenge of providing all students rich opportunities to learn.

Details

Annual Review of Comparative and International Education 2014
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-453-4

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Article

Tobias Kopp, Steffen Kinkel, Teresa Schäfer, Barbara Kieslinger and Alan John Brown

The purpose of this article is to explore the importance of workplace learning in the context of performance measurement on an organisational level. It shows how workplace…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this article is to explore the importance of workplace learning in the context of performance measurement on an organisational level. It shows how workplace learning analytics can be grounded on professional identity transformation theory and integrated into performance measurement approaches to understand its organisation-wide impact.

Design/methodology/approach

In a conceptual approach, a framework to measure the organisation-wide impact of workplace learning interventions has been developed. As a basis for the description of the framework, related research on relevant concepts in the field of performance measurement approaches, workplace learning, professional identity transformation, workplace and social learning analytics are discussed. A case study in a European Public Employment Service is presented. The framework is validated by qualitative evaluation data from three case studies. Finally, theoretical as well as practical implications are discussed.

Findings

Professional identity transformation theory provides a suitable theoretical framework to gain new insights into various dimensions of workplace learning. Workplace learning analytics can reasonably be combined with classical performance management approaches to demonstrate its organisation-wide impact. A holistic and streamlined framework is perceived as beneficial by practitioners from several European Public Employment Services.

Research limitations/implications

Empirical data originates from three case studies in the non-profit sector only. The presented framework needs to be further evaluated in different organisations and settings.

Practical implications

The presented framework enables non-profit organisations to integrate workplace learning analytics in their organisation-wide performance measurement, which raises awareness for the importance of social learning at the workplace.

Originality/value

The paper enriches the scarce research base about workplace learning analytics and its potential links to organisation-wide performance measurement approaches. In contrast to most previous literature, a thorough conceptualisation of workplace learning as a process of professional identity transformation is used.

Details

International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, vol. 69 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0401

Keywords

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