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Article
Publication date: 10 June 2021

Kelum Jayasinghe

This study aims to address the possibility of integrating some elements of the “radical constructivist” approach to management accounting teaching. It answers the…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to address the possibility of integrating some elements of the “radical constructivist” approach to management accounting teaching. It answers the following two questions: to what extent should management accounting educators construct a “radical constructivist” foundation to guide active learning? Then, in which ways can management accounting educators use qualitative methods to facilitate “radical constructivist” education?

Design/methodology/approach

The study uses a teaching cycle that implements innovative learning elements, e.g. learning from ordinary people, designed following the principles of “radical constructivism”, to engage students with “externalities” at the centre of their knowledge construction. It adopts an ethnographic approach comprising interviews and participant observation for the data collection, followed by the application of qualitative content and narrative analysis of the data.

Findings

The study findings and reflections illustrate that the majority of students respond positively to radical constructivist learning if the educators can develop an innovative problem-solving and authentic environment that is close to their real lives. The radical constructivist teaching cycle discussed in this study has challenged the mindsets of the management accounting students as it altered the traditional objectivist academic learning approaches that students were familiar with. Its use of qualitative methods facilitated active learning. Student feedback was sought as part of the qualitative design, which provided a constructive mechanism for the students and educators to learn and unlearn from their mistakes. This process enriched the understanding of learners (students) and educators of successful engagement in radical constructivist management accounting education and provides a base upon which to design future teaching cycles.

Originality/value

The paper provides proof of the ability of accounting educators, as change agents, to apply radical constructivist epistemology combined with multiple qualitative research methods by creating new constructive learning structures and cultures associated with innovative deep-learning tasks in management accounting education.

Details

Qualitative Research in Accounting & Management, vol. 18 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1176-6093

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Article
Publication date: 8 October 2018

Robin Bell and Peng Liu

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the perceived challenges that Chinese vocational college educators face in developing and delivering constructivist active and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the perceived challenges that Chinese vocational college educators face in developing and delivering constructivist active and experiential entrepreneurship education.

Design/methodology/approach

Qualitative data were collected from 24 focus groups of educators who had been tasked with embedding constructivist entrepreneurship education into their teaching and curriculum, at four different vocational colleges situated in four different provinces in China. The data were coded and analysed for emerging themes using a process of bottom-up thematic analysis.

Findings

A range of concerns were identified from the focus groups and these could be divided into five main challenges, which were the role of the educator in the constructivist learning process and their ability to control the process; the educators perceived student reaction to the process and their engagement with it; the time and technology required to deliver the process; the link between the learning and industry; and the educators’ perception of the requirements to meet internal expectations.

Research limitations/implications

This research explores the educators’ perceptions of the challenges they face in developing and delivering active and experiential constructivist entrepreneurship education. Whilst these concerns may impact how the educators’ approach the task, these concerns are only perceived, as the educators’ have not yet implemented the introduction of constructivist entrepreneurship education when other challenges may become evident.

Originality/value

Encouragement by the Chinese Government to develop and deliver constructivist active and experiential entrepreneurship education has resulted in a number of tensions and challenges. Entrepreneurship education in China is still relatively young and under researched and this research contributes to the literature by exploring the challenges that educators face in developing and delivering constructivist entrepreneurship education in Chinese vocational colleges.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 26 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

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Book part
Publication date: 24 May 2017

Alexandros Kakouris

Entrepreneurship education is observed as expanding in both academic and informal settings. Drawing on the Business Schools paradigm, relevant courses deliver contiguous…

Abstract

Entrepreneurship education is observed as expanding in both academic and informal settings. Drawing on the Business Schools paradigm, relevant courses deliver contiguous knowledge and competencies applicable to new business creation based on cognitive and experiential instruction. Germane studies explore the entrepreneurial intention of trainees as a consequence of the pursued instruction. This chapter follows a more student-centric perspective which supposes the underlying cognitive schemes of trainees and their evolution as primordial structures that are affected through learning. This focus turns the approach into pure constructivism where the Piagetian concepts of assimilation and accommodation underpin learning. Based on a coherent constructivist online environment, that is the TeleCC platform in Greece, evidence for reflection, critical thinking and meta-learning incidents is investigated amongst the trainees’ dialogues and comments. The appearance of these processes verifies the dynamics of constructivist learning and Piaget’s equilibration process. There has been minimal attention in research so far into genuine constructivist signatures relevant to entrepreneurial learning; a gap that motivated the research of this chapter. The features of the learning environment and the facilitating role for the educator are crucial presuppositions for deep constructivist learning processes to occur. Else, instructional interventions favour the customary guidance and knowledge or experience transfer. It is maintained that the constructivist approach is an underdeveloped yet innovative perspective for educational research in entrepreneurship that needs good examples and contextualisation of relevant concepts and processes. Its contribution will be especially important and inclusive for the lifelong learning domain where adult learners participate in with repositories of personal life experiences and crystallised and resistant conceptualisations for the phenomena under consideration.

Details

Entrepreneurship Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-280-0

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Article
Publication date: 31 May 2019

Annick Ancelin-Bourguignon

Drawing on educational science research and concepts, this paper aims to organize and analyze prior accounting literature on the integration of research into teaching and…

Abstract

Purpose

Drawing on educational science research and concepts, this paper aims to organize and analyze prior accounting literature on the integration of research into teaching and provides evidence for the relevance of integrating research into constructivist management accounting teaching.

Design/methodology/approach

Evidence shall be drawn from the autoethnographic account of a case study, namely, an MiM course in a French business school.

Findings

The presentation of qualitative research plays a priming role in collective debates where knowledge is co-produced by the group of students.

Research limitations/implications

The analysis opens up many avenues for future research on constructivist accounting teaching (e.g. teachers’ profiles, cross-cultural comparison) and its consequences.

Practical implications

The case provides examples of how, in practice and beyond general principles, the constructivist teacher adapts to his/her audience and their educational heritage. It also invites a holistic consideration of teaching arrangements, the relationships between their elements and their collective impact on learning.

Originality/value

The case study, the analysis of which draws on educational science frameworks and concepts, provides an in-depth account of research integration into constructivist accounting teaching.

Details

Qualitative Research in Accounting & Management, vol. 16 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1176-6093

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2005

Mai Neo

The purpose of this paper is to study the impact of a web‐based constructivist learning environment, which was developed based on a course given to students in the Faculty…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to study the impact of a web‐based constructivist learning environment, which was developed based on a course given to students in the Faculty of Creative Multimedia (FCM) on student learning.

Design/methodology/approach

In this paper, a web‐based multimedia‐mediated project was developed based on an Internet Applications course where students were taught to use specific web authoring tools to solve a web‐related problem. The mode of learning was geared towards a student‐centred, constructivist learning perspective where students were active learners, worked in a group environment and constructed knowledge and understanding in their learning process. An online survey was given to the students to assess their reactions towards this learning environment.

Findings

The results obtained were positive and satisfactory. In this learning process, students were able to understand the problem, work collaboratively, construct their own solutions, and determine their own learning outcomes. Feedback on the online survey provided further support of the students' positive attitudes towards this learning environment.

Research limitations/implications

The implications of this research study are that students found that the web‐based learning environment allowed them to be more active participants in their learning process, increasing their critical and creative thinking skills as well as improving their problem‐solving skills. They learned “how to learn” and developed several learning skills such as communication, teamwork, collaboration and presentation, as well as achieving ownership of these learning outcomes. The use of multimedia‐ and web‐based tools for their project allowed them to be innovative in their presentations, making the project more fun for them.

Practical implications

This research provides educators with an innovative approach to teaching with technology, and students with a more effective learning environment.

Originality/value

This paper fulfils Malaysia's MSC initiative to include ICT in the classroom teaching environment and to focus on learner‐centred teaching and learning strategies. This constructivist‐based learning environment also enabled students to build their problem‐solving and collaborative skills as well as their creative and critical thinking abilities in order to meet the rising demands of twenty‐first century organisations.

Details

Campus-Wide Information Systems, vol. 22 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1065-0741

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Article
Publication date: 12 April 2011

David Porcaro

Many educators have advocated constructivist‐based pedagogies as a way to develop the skills needed in knowledge societies. However, many countries have a tradition of…

Abstract

Purpose

Many educators have advocated constructivist‐based pedagogies as a way to develop the skills needed in knowledge societies. However, many countries have a tradition of instructivist‐based practices, which rely on didactic lectures, rote memorization and high‐stakes exams. The purpose of this paper is to conceptualize the reactions to constructivist‐based pedagogy in instructivist‐based learning cultures.

Design/methodology/approach

The author employs a literature review to compare the philosophical and pedagogical differences between constructivism and instructivism, and proposes a conceptual model for introducing constructivist‐based pedagogies into instructivist learning cultures.

Findings

The needs of teachers, students, and institutions intersect during pedagogical innovations, which take place within national systems. The alignment between students' and teachers' educational philosophies, as well as an institutional system's resources, policy, and culture can bring conflict or congruence, as teachers, students, administrators and other stakeholders dismiss, adapt, ignore or celebrate the (mis)alignment.

Originality/value

The model described in this paper is intended to serve as a guide for educators who are introducing innovative pedagogies in a variety of settings, and will continued to be validated through a design‐research study in Oman.

Details

Multicultural Education & Technology Journal, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-497X

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2006

Johannes C. Cronjé and Dirk Burger

The purpose of this paper is to consider the type of learning that takes place if members of an under‐resourced community are exposed to a free‐to‐use computer that is…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to consider the type of learning that takes place if members of an under‐resourced community are exposed to a free‐to‐use computer that is connected to the internet.

Design/methodology/approach

Qualitative application of an instrument that was developed to evaluate the information resource for the extent to which it facilitates both objectivist and constructivist learning. Video recordings of the interactions of people at the information kiosk were viewed and transcribed, and subjected to classical analysis to answer the questions posed by the instrument.

Findings

It was found that this particular information resource contained both objectivist and constructivist elements. Furthermore, it was found that objectivism and constructivism are complementary to one another and the degree of integration varies according to certain pedagogical dimensions. An open‐access information portal affords opportunities both for direct instruction and constructivist learning.

Research limitations/implications

Based in a peri‐urban environment in South Africa with a small sample.

Practical implications

The main contribution of this study is to investigate the interaction between information, knowledge, learning and pedagogy, which will help the information designer to better understand these interactions when designing an information resource. Furthermore, the instrument developed for this study can be used to evaluate other information resources, thus ultimately improving the standard of such resources.

Originality/value

The paper proposes a solution to the age‐old objectivist/constructivist debate that prevails when considering the cognitive functioning of information users.

Details

Aslib Proceedings, vol. 58 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0001-253X

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Article
Publication date: 10 March 2020

Erin Nerlino

This paper identifies two conceptualizations of teacher leadership – constructivist leadership theory and sociocultural theory. Using aspects of the conceptualizations…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper identifies two conceptualizations of teacher leadership – constructivist leadership theory and sociocultural theory. Using aspects of the conceptualizations, this paper provides direction for future study into and implementation of teacher leadership.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper draws from both review and empirical literature that references constructivist leadership theory and sociocultural theory or that describes aspects of the aforementioned theories in relation to teacher leadership.

Findings

Findings reveal that both constructivist leadership theory and sociocultural theory provide insight into the past lukewarm success of teacher leadership implementation and guidance for future efforts in teacher leadership. Such efforts include reconceptualizing leadership in schools, redesigning development opportunities for teachers based on the link between leading and learning, capitalizing on collaboration between universities and schools, focusing on the mentorship of new teachers and developing teacher leadership in relation to well-studied local school cultures.

Originality/value

The literature reviews of York-Barr and Duke (2004) and Wenner and Campbell (2017) regarding teacher leadership describe the field as largely atheoretical. This paper provides a theoretical grounding for teacher leadership in constructivist leadership theory and sociocultural theory and derives direction for future work around teacher leadership from a combination of these theories.

Details

Journal of Professional Capital and Community, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-9548

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Article
Publication date: 21 June 2013

Carol Jordan

Constructivism is a way of knowing where learners collaborate, reflect and use their own experiences to construct new knowledge. This paper aims to evaluate whether an…

Abstract

Purpose

Constructivism is a way of knowing where learners collaborate, reflect and use their own experiences to construct new knowledge. This paper aims to evaluate whether an open source Moodle e‐learning can deliver an instructional model using constructivist learning theories in an International Baccalaureate chemistry class.

Design/methodology/approach

A review of the literature shows that students’ learning outcomes online are likely to be better when their actual learning environment closely matches their preferred or ideal learning environment. An online learning survey was administered to the students towards the end of their two‐year course and the Wilcoxon signed rank test used to measure the difference between the student's actual and preferred experiences with the online activities that used constructivist theories.

Findings

The findings showed that the activities provided by Moodle do foster a constructivist approach to learning and can provide students with the types of learning experiences they desire. However, their effectiveness is to a large extent dependent on the teacher's role in designing and directing the online learning experience. This is significant because it implies that for an online learning environment to be successful, a strong pedagogical strategy that emphasizes a constructivist approach needs to be consistently emphasized and practiced; having the technology tools available does not guarantee this.

Originality/value

This paper's findings show that constructivism as a learning theory can be translated into practice, and used to design and deliver online learning experiences that provide students with a style of learning they prefer. However, the extent to which this is successful depends on the teacher's role in designing and directing the online learning experience. This is significant because to be successful a strong instructional strategy shaped by the beliefs of the teacher emphasizing a constructivist approach needs to be consistently emphasized.

Details

International Journal for Lesson and Learning Studies, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-8253

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Article
Publication date: 2 October 2020

Robin Bell and Heather Bell

Experiential approaches have become increasingly common in entrepreneurship education in response to calls for different approaches to the traditional didactic…

Abstract

Purpose

Experiential approaches have become increasingly common in entrepreneurship education in response to calls for different approaches to the traditional didactic process-driven approach. Experiential approaches offer the potential to develop the skills and mindset that are required in entrepreneurship. Research has highlighted the critical importance of educator pedagogical competence in the delivery and quality of teaching and learning in further and higher education. Nevertheless, educator narratives and practices are often based on foundations that suggest a lack in the depth of knowledge and understanding of the underlying pedagogic learning theories and practice. This paper brings educational theory and pedagogic practice together in a three-stage framework of the experiential entrepreneurship learning process to support entrepreneurship educators within further and higher education.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper reviews and brings together the seminal educational theories and philosophies of constructivism, objectivism, Kolb's (1984) theory of experiential learning, Schön's (1983) reflection-in-action and Mezirow's (1997) theory of transformative learning, to develop a framework which underpins the experiential entrepreneurship learning process.

Findings

This paper develops a three-stage framework which informs the roles of an educator and a learner in experiential entrepreneurship education within further and higher education, based on educational theories and philosophies that inform the learning process.

Practical implications

The developed framework supports the pedagogic competence of educators in the delivery of experiential entrepreneurship education through a deeper understanding of the supporting theory that informs the pedagogic practice. This will provide consolidation to enable educators to maximise the effectiveness of their educational practice (Kaynardağ, 2019) and can increase the legitimacy of entrepreneurship education (Foliard et al., 2018).

Originality/value

This paper meets calls in the literature to provide a closer engagement between educational theory and pedagogic practice to afford guidance as to how educators can navigate some of the different educational theories and philosophies to consolidate the effective delivery of quality experiential entrepreneurship education. Applying seminal educational theories and philosophies to ensure the quality of experiential education can support the legitimacy of experiential entrepreneurship education.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 27 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

Keywords

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