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Article
Publication date: 8 October 2018

Robin Bell and Peng Liu

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the perceived challenges that Chinese vocational college educators face in developing and delivering constructivist active and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the perceived challenges that Chinese vocational college educators face in developing and delivering constructivist active and experiential entrepreneurship education.

Design/methodology/approach

Qualitative data were collected from 24 focus groups of educators who had been tasked with embedding constructivist entrepreneurship education into their teaching and curriculum, at four different vocational colleges situated in four different provinces in China. The data were coded and analysed for emerging themes using a process of bottom-up thematic analysis.

Findings

A range of concerns were identified from the focus groups and these could be divided into five main challenges, which were the role of the educator in the constructivist learning process and their ability to control the process; the educators perceived student reaction to the process and their engagement with it; the time and technology required to deliver the process; the link between the learning and industry; and the educators’ perception of the requirements to meet internal expectations.

Research limitations/implications

This research explores the educators’ perceptions of the challenges they face in developing and delivering active and experiential constructivist entrepreneurship education. Whilst these concerns may impact how the educators’ approach the task, these concerns are only perceived, as the educators’ have not yet implemented the introduction of constructivist entrepreneurship education when other challenges may become evident.

Originality/value

Encouragement by the Chinese Government to develop and deliver constructivist active and experiential entrepreneurship education has resulted in a number of tensions and challenges. Entrepreneurship education in China is still relatively young and under researched and this research contributes to the literature by exploring the challenges that educators face in developing and delivering constructivist entrepreneurship education in Chinese vocational colleges.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 26 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 October 2020

Robin Bell and Heather Bell

Experiential approaches have become increasingly common in entrepreneurship education in response to calls for different approaches to the traditional didactic…

Abstract

Purpose

Experiential approaches have become increasingly common in entrepreneurship education in response to calls for different approaches to the traditional didactic process-driven approach. Experiential approaches offer the potential to develop the skills and mindset that are required in entrepreneurship. Research has highlighted the critical importance of educator pedagogical competence in the delivery and quality of teaching and learning in further and higher education. Nevertheless, educator narratives and practices are often based on foundations that suggest a lack in the depth of knowledge and understanding of the underlying pedagogic learning theories and practice. This paper brings educational theory and pedagogic practice together in a three-stage framework of the experiential entrepreneurship learning process to support entrepreneurship educators within further and higher education.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper reviews and brings together the seminal educational theories and philosophies of constructivism, objectivism, Kolb's (1984) theory of experiential learning, Schön's (1983) reflection-in-action and Mezirow's (1997) theory of transformative learning, to develop a framework which underpins the experiential entrepreneurship learning process.

Findings

This paper develops a three-stage framework which informs the roles of an educator and a learner in experiential entrepreneurship education within further and higher education, based on educational theories and philosophies that inform the learning process.

Practical implications

The developed framework supports the pedagogic competence of educators in the delivery of experiential entrepreneurship education through a deeper understanding of the supporting theory that informs the pedagogic practice. This will provide consolidation to enable educators to maximise the effectiveness of their educational practice (Kaynardağ, 2019) and can increase the legitimacy of entrepreneurship education (Foliard et al., 2018).

Originality/value

This paper meets calls in the literature to provide a closer engagement between educational theory and pedagogic practice to afford guidance as to how educators can navigate some of the different educational theories and philosophies to consolidate the effective delivery of quality experiential entrepreneurship education. Applying seminal educational theories and philosophies to ensure the quality of experiential education can support the legitimacy of experiential entrepreneurship education.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 27 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 28 February 2017

A. Renee Staton and Steven Grande

The need for culturally competent, globally skilled students is evident (Goldberg, Pasher, & Levin-Sagi, 2006), especially given our current climate of unrest and cultural…

Abstract

The need for culturally competent, globally skilled students is evident (Goldberg, Pasher, & Levin-Sagi, 2006), especially given our current climate of unrest and cultural misunderstanding. Educational efforts that emphasize contradiction and indigenous knowledge to prepare students for global community engagement have the potential to lead students to complex and systemic understanding of themselves and the world in which we live. These constructivist practices can create an overarching structure that enables students to acknowledge the ambiguity inherent in complex systems, hold contradictory thoughts regarding basic beliefs and values, and thereby deepen their comprehension and critical thought while respecting the integrity of the communities with which we work. Recommendations for creating and facilitating an educational environment based on respectful inquisitiveness and acceptance of dissonance are presented through the description of a three stage, constructivist-oriented model.

Details

Engaging Dissonance: Developing Mindful Global Citizenship in Higher Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-154-4

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 20 December 2007

Manon Haartsen‐Geven and Jacobijn Sandberg

The purpose of the paper is to provide insight in the critical factors involved in creating an optimum in developing technology for educational innovation, for each…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the paper is to provide insight in the critical factors involved in creating an optimum in developing technology for educational innovation, for each stakeholder, in any relevant context and at any time.

Design/methodology/approach

From literature review, four diagrams were constructed to contain the critical factors involved in creating an optimum in developing technology for educational innovation in different “views”. These four diagrams, as a theoretical instrument for analysis, was then reshaped into a practical instrument for analysis, in the form of an online questionnaire, and tested with five different projects in three different schools.

Findings

The critical factors can be ordered by stakeholder, by context and by time. Each ordering provides a different view on the development process. Using the different views for different cases, more insight is provided and more guidelines for improvement can be found.

Research limitations/implications

The practical instrument needs improvement to be more easy to use for teachers and students. Future research is also needed to test both the practical instrument as well as the theoretical instrument further, to be able to refine them where needed.

Practical implications

A very insightful instrument to analyse the success factors of developing of technology for educational innovation for the different stakeholders, in different context and at different times in the process.

Originality/value

This paper combines an overview of the critical success factors of developing of technology for educational innovation with different views of these factors, to provide more insight in the process.

Details

Interactive Technology and Smart Education, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-5659

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 19 September 2020

Olga Dziubaniuk and Monica Nyholm

This paper aims to explore methods of teaching sustainability and business ethics, relevant to the modern demand for student’s skills and knowledge. The study explores the…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore methods of teaching sustainability and business ethics, relevant to the modern demand for student’s skills and knowledge. The study explores the challenges of teaching a business school undergraduate-level course and argues that a constructivist pedagogy is a suitable epistemological approach for designing a course unit concerning sustainability and ethics.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper presents case study findings drawn upon course feedback and course reflections aimed at making sense of what the most effective pedagogic approaches were that influenced students’ learning.

Findings

Results indicate that students appreciate active forms of learning via practical assignments and discussions. As knowledge of sustainability and business ethics is important for the student’s future career path, students need to develop skills of applying conceptual knowledge to practice via constructive pedagogical methods.

Practical implications

This empirical study contributes to the literature of constructivist pedagogics, which is explored in the context of sustainable development and business ethics teaching. Practically, it contributes to the analysis of teaching methods and frameworks applied in the course emphasizing the necessity of engaging in interactive and personalized learning and teaching processes.

Originality/value

Issues of teaching ethics and sustainable development are known concerns, but they have to be addressed systematically because of the changing business environment. This study explores the constructivist pedagogy based on empirical evidence and highlights its value in the educational process.

Details

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. 22 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

Keywords

Open Access

Abstract

Details

Learning and Teaching in Higher Education: Gulf Perspectives, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2077-5504

Article
Publication date: 12 April 2013

Kaija L. Zusevics, Melissa A. Lemke, Amy E. Harley and Paul Florsheim

Milwaukee has very high rates of risky sexual behavior and low rates of academic achievement among adolescents. Milwaukee school representatives partnered with researchers…

1445

Abstract

Purpose

Milwaukee has very high rates of risky sexual behavior and low rates of academic achievement among adolescents. Milwaukee school representatives partnered with researchers to create and implement an innovative project‐based learning (PBL) high school health curriculum to engage students in school. This health education program, Project Health (PH), aimed to engage Milwaukee Public Schools high school students, by PBL, into the urban health classroom. The purpose of this paper is to examine the impact of the curriculum on student engagement and document the process of implementing this program, in order to identify strengths, weaknesses and areas of needed improvement.

Design/methodology/approach

Student engagement was measured with an 18‐item scale at three time points in intervention and control schools. Attendance data were collected by tracking the number of days students were absent from school the semester the curriculum was implemented. Analysis of covariance was used to test whether students in PH classes were more engaged and if they had fewer absences than students in the control classes. The process evaluation included interviews with teachers, focus groups with high school students, and focus groups with teaching assistants. Interviews were transcribed and analyzed using thematic analysis to extract key themes and categories across all data.

Findings

Students in the intervention health class were significantly less absent from school than control students. However, they were not more engaged than their peers in control schools as measured by a student engagement scale. Various components of the PBL teaching approach used in the Project Health high school curriculum were viewed as positive by health educators, students, and teaching assistants. Results indicate that PBL used in health education may increase school attendance.

Originality/value

This study was original in that it documented how a novel health education program that incorporated PBL can positively impact urban students’ school attendance. It also highlighted the process of implementing this program from the vantage point of students, assistants, and health education.

Article
Publication date: 8 June 2012

Mark Wyatt and Ewen Arnold

The purpose of this paper is to explore the school‐based learning mentoring of a senior teacher of English in Oman, who was conducting action research into her mentoring…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the school‐based learning mentoring of a senior teacher of English in Oman, who was conducting action research into her mentoring practices while engaged in part‐time in‐service language teacher education. The senior teacher realized teachers in her school found post‐lesson discussions in English with inspectors challenging and, using video‐stimulated recall, tried to help them become more reflective.

Design/methodology/approach

Qualitative case study research methodology: semi‐structured interviews provide insights into the senior teacher's perceptions of her own development and professional knowledge of reflective practice and mentoring. They also provide oral accounts of her action research, written accounts of which are provided by reflective writing. Audio‐recordings and transcripts of post‐lesson discussions, triangulated with classroom observation, provide evidence of mentoring practices.

Findings

The senior teacher developed creative and flexible solutions to the challenges she faced, in the process gaining confidence and assuming mentor identity. Various factors helped, including a supportive environment, the in‐service teacher education course and engagement with video‐stimulated recall.

Research limitations/implications

Despite methodological limitations, including limited observational data and use of self‐report, there are implications for socio‐cultural contexts where English has a semi‐official role in mentoring discussions and where there are moves towards reflective models of teacher development.

Practical implications

Video‐stimulated recall may be a particularly effective tool for supporting learning mentoring in contexts where loyalty to the “in‐group” encourages sharing. To facilitate learning mentoring, the creation and maintenance of supportive environments appears crucial.

Originality/value

Learning mentors seeking fresh ideas, teacher educators and school managers will find this useful.

Details

International Journal of Mentoring and Coaching in Education, vol. 1 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-6854

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 September 2016

Teck-Soon Hew and Sharifah Latifah Syed Abdul Kadir

Cloud computing technology is advancing and expanding at an explosive rate. These advancements have further extended the capabilities of the virtual learning environment…

1525

Abstract

Purpose

Cloud computing technology is advancing and expanding at an explosive rate. These advancements have further extended the capabilities of the virtual learning environment (VLE) to provide accessibility anywhere, anytime where educational resources can be saved, modified, retrieved and shared on the cloud. The purpose of this paper is to examine the predictors of instructional effectiveness of cloud computing VLE by extending the Self Determination and Channel Expansion Theory with external constructs of VLE interactivity, content design, school support, trust in website, knowledge sharing attitude and demographic variables.

Design/methodology/approach

Random sampling data were collected in two waves of nation-wide survey and analyzed with artificial neural network approach.

Findings

SDT, CET, content design, interactivity, trust in website, school support and demographics significantly predict instructional effectiveness.

Research limitations/implications

The study has provided a new paradigm shift from investigating the behavioral intention and continuance intention to the effectiveness of an information system. It advocates that quality of research may be improved by adhering to the basic research methodology starting from rigorous instrument development and validation to future research direction.

Practical implications

The research provides implications to Ministry of Education, the VLE content and service providers, scholars and practitioners.

Social implications

The findings of the study may further improve the quality of living of the society when the instructional effectiveness of the cloud-based VLE is further enhanced.

Originality/value

Existing grid computing VLE studies have focussed on the acceptance of students and teachers and not its instructional effectiveness. Unlike existing studies that examined extrinsic motivational factors (e.g. TAM, UTAUT), this study uses intrinsic motivational factors (e.g. relatedness, competence and autonomy) as well as perceived media richness. Malaysia is the first nation to implement the VLE at a national scale and the findings from this study will provide a new insight on the determinants of instructional effectiveness of the VLE system.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 116 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 13 May 2021

Dina Sebastião and Sara Dias-Trindade

This chapter theorizes a proposal for applying the study of Brexit as a pedagogical strategy in an European Studies (ES) bachelor program, as a means to activate…

Abstract

This chapter theorizes a proposal for applying the study of Brexit as a pedagogical strategy in an European Studies (ES) bachelor program, as a means to activate theoretical knowledge for different disciplinary and thematic fields of study about the European Union. The proposal uses the problem-based learning (PBL) approach as a pedagogical methodology and the bachelor of ES at the Faculty of Arts and Humanities at the University of Coimbra as a case study to rehearse teaching innovation. It is based on a theoretical part, conciliating PBL as a pedagogical tool in social sciences and humanities with the exceptionalism of Brexit within the European integration theories and the study of European policies to activate and question prior scientific knowledge, and on a survey to bachelor’s students and alumni on the pertinence of PBL and of Brexit as an empirical element for scientific knowledge in ES. As a result, specific proposals to use Brexit in PBL experiences in different disciplinary areas of ES are made, paving the way for a range of teaching and learning opportunities and challenges released by Brexit to make progress in the ES pedagogical framework.

Details

Teaching the EU: Fostering Knowledge and Understanding in the Brexit Age
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-274-1

Keywords

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