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Article
Publication date: 23 September 2013

Milorad M. Novicevic, John Humphreys, M. Ronald Buckley, Foster Roberts, Andrew Hebdon and Jaemin Kim

– The purpose of this paper is to derive practical recommendations from Follett's conceptualization of the student-teacher relations.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to derive practical recommendations from Follett's conceptualization of the student-teacher relations.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper employs a narrative historical interpretation of Follett's speech, which was originally given at the Boston University in the late Fall of 1928, but for the first time published in 1970.

Findings

Follett's conceptualization of the teacher-student relation resonated well with the contemporary conceptualization of constructive-developmental theory of leadership.

Research limitations/implications

The findings of this study should be interpreted with recognition that the single case study has inherent limitations in terms of generalization.

Originality/value

This paper offers unique practical recommendations for instructional methods of experiential learning based on reflection, problem solving and critical thinking, which are based on the authors' analysis of Follett's works and constructive-developmental scholarship.

Details

Journal of Management History, vol. 19 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1348

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 8 February 2008

Lauren S. Harris and Karl W. Kuhnert

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationships between leadership development level (LDL) and leadership effectiveness utilizing 360‐degree feedback scores…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationships between leadership development level (LDL) and leadership effectiveness utilizing 360‐degree feedback scores. Researchers examine raters' ability to recognize effective leadership practices using a constructive developmental framework.

Design/methodology/approach

This approach is quantitative and involved data gathered from subject‐object CD interviews and 360‐degree feedback scores collected from individuals enrolled in an executive leadership development program.

Findings

The analysis revealed that LDL predicted leadership effectiveness using the 360‐degree feedback measure across a number of sources including superiors, subordinates, and peers. In addition, researchers reveal that individuals that lead from higher levels are more effective in a number of leadership competencies (e.g. Leading Change, Managing Performance, Creating a Compelling Vision, etc.). Finally, the research demonstrates that superiors and peers can predict leader effectiveness better than subordinates or oneself.

Research limitations/implications

Implications for integrating constructive developmental theory in both the research and practice of leader selection and development is discussed.

Originality/value

This study is one of the first studies to empirically demonstrate the link between leadership development level and leadership effectiveness using the constructive developmental framework.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 29 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

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Article
Publication date: 14 June 2013

Rajashi Ghosh, Ray K. Haynes and Kathy E. Kram

The purpose of this paper is to elaborate how an adult development perspective can further the understanding of developmental networks as holding environments for…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to elaborate how an adult development perspective can further the understanding of developmental networks as holding environments for developing leaders confronted with challenging experiences.

Design/methodology/approach

The article utilizes constructive developmental theory (C‐D theory) to explore and address the implications of an adult development lens for leader development, especially as they confront complex leadership challenges that trigger anxiety.

Findings

Theoretical propositions suggest different kinds of holding behaviors (e.g. confirmation, contradiction, and continuity) necessary for enabling growth and effectiveness for leaders located in different developmental orders.

Research limitations/implications

Propositions offered can guide future researchers to explore how leaders confronted with different kinds of leadership challenges sustain responsive developmental networks over time and how the developers in the leader's network coordinate to provide confirmation, contradiction, and continuity needed for leader development.

Practical implications

Leaders and their developers should reflect on how developmental orders may determine which types of holding behaviors are necessary for producing leader effectiveness amidst challenging leadership experiences. Organizations should provide assessment centers and appropriate training and development interventions to facilitate this reflection.

Social implications

This paper demonstrates the important role that developmental relationships play in leadership effectiveness and growth over time. Individuals and organizations are urged to attend to the quality and availability of high quality developmental relationships for purposes of continuous learning and development.

Originality/value

This article re‐conceptualizes developmental networks as holding environments that can enable leader's growth as an adult and, hence, increase their effectiveness as leaders amidst complex leadership challenges.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 18 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

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Article
Publication date: 29 June 2012

Barrett C. Brown

This paper aims to document how leaders with a highly‐developed meaning‐making system design and engage in sustainability initiatives.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to document how leaders with a highly‐developed meaning‐making system design and engage in sustainability initiatives.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 32 leaders and change agents were assessed for their meaning‐making system, or action logic, using a variation of the Washington University Sentence Completion Test; 13 were identified as holding the three rarest and most complex action logics able to be measured. Semi‐structured, in‐depth interviews explored their behavior and actions as related to complex change initiatives.

Findings

These leaders appear to: design from a deep inner foundation, including grounding their work in transpersonal meaning; access non‐rational ways of knowing, and use systems, complexity, and integral theories; and adaptively manage through “dialogue” with the system, three distinct roles, and developmental practices. Fifteen leadership competencies and developmental stage distinctions for three dimensions of leadership were identified.

Research limitations/implications

The sample size leads to the findings being propositions that require further validation before broader generalization.

Practical implications

The results provide the most granular view to date of how individuals with highly complex meaning‐making may think and behave with respect to complex change, offering potential insight into the future of leadership.

Social implications

The study explores how to cultivate leadership with the capacity to address complex social, economic, and environmental challenges.

Originality/value

The paper documents 15 competencies that are largely new to the leadership literature, and that reflect the actions of leaders operating with highly sophisticated meaning‐making systems.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 25 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

Keywords

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Abstract

Details

Maturing Leadership: How Adult Development Impacts Leadership
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-402-7

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Abstract

Details

Maturing Leadership: How Adult Development Impacts Leadership
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-402-7

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Article
Publication date: 28 October 2013

Barry Barnes, John H. Humphreys, Jennifer D. Oyler, Stephanie S. Pane Haden and Milorad M. Novicevic

Although communal forms of leadership are being called for to provide contemporary organizations with more responsive leadership platforms, the paper can find no…

Abstract

Purpose

Although communal forms of leadership are being called for to provide contemporary organizations with more responsive leadership platforms, the paper can find no compelling description as to how such leadership might develop in a world of hierarchy. The purpose of this paper is to fill this void.

Design/methodology/approach

Attempting to comprehend the sharing of leadership will require contemplation of unconventional approaches in opposition to the dominant logic associated with conventional organizational leadership. One current example of such unorthodox deliberation is the emerging awareness of the Grateful Dead's influence on business management and leadership. Accordingly, the paper examined and interpreted the experiences and expressed beliefs of Jerry Garcia of the Grateful Dead to offer a conceptualization of how shared leadership could emerge in traditional organizational settings.

Findings

The analysis indicates that Jerry Garcia exhibited aspects of transformational leadership, servant leadership, and authentic leadership that allowed him to influence the environment needed for the emergence of shared leadership.

Research limitations/implications

As a single case study, the primary limitation is one of generalizability. The paper accepts the trade-off, however, due to the significant conceptual insights available with a case methodology.

Practical implications

Without greater understanding of how shared leadership might unfold practitioners will assume the construct of shared leadership is laudable but naïve. The paper must begin developing plausible conceptualizations if the notion of sharing leadership is to be taken more seriously in organizations.

Originality/value

The paper offers a counterintuitive, counterculture conceptualization of how shared leadership could emerge and flourish in traditional hierarchical settings.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 34 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 12 April 2011

Charles Baron and Mario Cayer

The purpose of this paper is to clarify why and how leadership development programs should be used to foster post‐conventional consciousness in their participants.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to clarify why and how leadership development programs should be used to foster post‐conventional consciousness in their participants.

Design/methodology/approach

Starting from the observation that current and future organizational challenges may be met with particular efficacy by leaders who operate in the post‐conventional stages of consciousness, this paper offers a comprehensive review of the work on consciousness development, the process by which it occurs, the distinctive abilities of leaders who have reached post‐conventional stages of consciousness and, finally, two practices which favour the emergence of these stages, namely mindfulness meditation and Bohm dialogue.

Findings

The paper shows how these two practices little‐used in the management field make it possible to reconcile the two main approaches to consciousness development: the recognition of one's cognitive, affective and operative patterns and their suspension in favour of a more direct contact with reality, in the here and now.

Practical implications

The paper highlights guiding principles for integrating such practices into leadership and management development programs.

Originality/value

Although the value of post‐conventional stages of consciousness in management and leadership roles is the subject of increasing discussion, to the authors' knowledge no work has yet thoroughly examined practices that foster post‐conventional development per se.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 30 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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Article
Publication date: 4 January 2019

Shahzad Khurram, Anjeela Khurram and Nyela Ashraf

This study aims to adopt the institutional theory perspective to understand how institutional inconsistencies experienced by individuals translate into meaninglessness…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to adopt the institutional theory perspective to understand how institutional inconsistencies experienced by individuals translate into meaninglessness. Moreover, using the constructive development theory, it provides a plausible explanation to the enigma – why do some organizational members develop meaninglessness, while others do not?

Design/methodology/approach

This conceptual paper is based on a critical evaluation of extant literature that helped to develop the empirically testable propositions.

Findings

Grounded in the three types of mindsets as proposed in the constructive development theory, this paper suggests that, for socialized knowers, the degree of meaninglessness is directly related to the extent to which valued others perceive meaninglessness with respect to the institutional prescription creating a certain degree of inconsistency. The self-authoring knowers experience a higher degree of meaninglessness, if the alternative institutional prescriptions challenge the ones attached to their desired identity. While, the self-transforming knowers feel a higher level of meaninglessness, when they realize that the institutional inconsistency is strongly related to the experiences of others impacted by it.

Originality/value

This study adds a significant value to the streams of institutional and constructive development theories literature. It theorizes the variations in organizational members’ feeling of meaninglessness in the face of institutional inconsistencies while considering the shaping effects of field pressure and disposition. These propositions integrate the institutional theory and constructive development theory and present more socially acceptable justifications of the organizational members’ reaction of meaninglessness to institutional inconsistencies.

Details

International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 27 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1934-8835

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Maturing Leadership: How Adult Development Impacts Leadership
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-402-7

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