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Book part
Publication date: 8 June 2011

Wayne A. Hochwarter, Gerald R. Ferris and T. Johnston Hanes

Purpose – The purpose of this chapter is to examine the frequency of multi-study research packages in the organizational sciences and advocate for their use by detailing…

Abstract

Purpose – The purpose of this chapter is to examine the frequency of multi-study research packages in the organizational sciences and advocate for their use by detailing strengths and recognizing limitations.

Methodology/approach – Philosophy of science research, focusing on multi-study research packages, is discussed followed by a 20-year review of incidence of these packages in top organizational sciences journals.

Findings – The publication of multi-study research packages have increased over the past 10 years, most notably in micro-level journals.

Social implications – For reasons of validity and generalizability, society benefits if scholars adopt multi-study approaches to knowledge generation and disseminate.

Originality/value of the chapter – This chapter provides the most comprehensive review of multiple-study research packages in the organizational sciences to date, examining publication trends in eight leading micro-and macro-level journals. We also summarize the use of multi-study packages in our own research and offer recommendations for improving the science of replication.

Details

Building Methodological Bridges
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-026-1

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Article
Publication date: 12 August 2014

Said Elbanna, Ioannis C. Thanos and Vassilis M. Papadakis

The purpose of this paper is to enhance the knowledge of the antecedents of political behaviour. Whereas political behaviour in strategic decision-making (SDM) has…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to enhance the knowledge of the antecedents of political behaviour. Whereas political behaviour in strategic decision-making (SDM) has received sustained interest in the literature, empirical examination of its antecedents has been meagre.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors conducted a constructive replication to examine the impact of three layers of context, namely, decision, firm and environment, on political behaviour. In Study 1, Greece, we gathered data on 143 strategic decisions, while in Study 2, Egypt, we collected data on 169 strategic decisions.

Findings

The evidence suggests that both decision-specific and firm factors act as antecedents to political behaviour, while environmental factors do not.

Practical implications

The findings support enhanced practitioner education regarding political behaviour and provide practitioners with a place from which to start by identifying the factors which might influence the occurrence of political behaviour in SDM.

Originality/value

The paper fills important gaps in the existing research on the influence of context on political behaviour and delineates interesting areas for further research.

Details

Journal of Strategy and Management, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-425X

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Book part
Publication date: 19 July 2005

Dan R. Dalton and Catherine M. Dalton

Meta-analysis has been relied on relatively infrequently in strategic management studies, certainly as compared to other fields such as the medical sciences, psychology…

Abstract

Meta-analysis has been relied on relatively infrequently in strategic management studies, certainly as compared to other fields such as the medical sciences, psychology, and education. This may be unfortunate, as there are several aspects of the manner in which strategic management studies are typically conducted that make them especially appropriate for this approach. To this end, we provide a brief foundation for meta-analysis, an example of meta-analysis, and a discussion of those elements that strongly recommend the efficacy of meta-analysis for the synthesis of strategic management studies.

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Research Methodology in Strategy and Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-208-5

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Article
Publication date: 5 November 2018

Kouliga Koala and Joshua Steinfeld

The purpose of this paper is to examine the level of theory building in public procurement by reviewing and classifying manuscripts published in the Journal of Public

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the level of theory building in public procurement by reviewing and classifying manuscripts published in the Journal of Public Procurement (JoPP) from 2001 to 2016.

Design/methodology/approach

The articles are divided into four important periods: discovery, agenda setting, embracing and expansion and consolidation. The articles are classified according to a hierarchical level of theory building composed of six levels: rapporteurs, reporters, testers, qualifiers, builders and expanders.

Findings

Key findings indicate that public procurement, in light of JoPP publications from 2001 to 2016, is at the tester level. There is also increase in the classification of articles with high level of theoretical contribution over time.

Details

Journal of Public Procurement, vol. 18 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1535-0118

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Book part
Publication date: 17 July 2007

J. Christian Broberg, Adam D. Bailey and James G. (Jerry) Hunt

This chapter uses a system dynamics approach to do a constructive replication (Lykken, 1968; Kelly, Chase, & Tucker, 1979; Hendrick, 1990) and extension of…

Abstract

This chapter uses a system dynamics approach to do a constructive replication (Lykken, 1968; Kelly, Chase, & Tucker, 1979; Hendrick, 1990) and extension of Reeves-Ellington's (this volume) timescape theory illustrated in his case study carried out at different hierarchical levels in Procter & Gamble. The timescape theory of temporal fit consists of two time perspectives – business time and social time – that compete for application. The senior-management level plays a key role in determining which timescape dominates. Reeves-Ellington argues that his findings show that organizational performance diminishes when there is a lack of fit between the timescapes of senior management and those of other levels of management. Our system dynamics model tests this notion and finds that the timescape case does not allow sufficient time to clearly demonstrate the hypothesized fit effects. In addition to timescape fit, environmental consumer demand aspects, which were not considered in the original case, are argued to affect Reeves-Ellington's performance measures. The system dynamics model's general emphasis on temporality and feedback provide especially for the constructive replication and extension of the timescape theory.

Details

Multi-Level Issues in Organizations and Time
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-7623-1434-8

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Article
Publication date: 14 March 2016

Ronda Marie Smith, Shruti R Sardeshmukh and Gwendolyn M Combs

– The purpose of this paper is to explore the complex relationships between gender and entrepreneurial intentions.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the complex relationships between gender and entrepreneurial intentions.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper uses a two study design where the second study is a constructive replication of the first study. The first study uses a cross-sectional design, while the second uses a design where data collection of variables were temporally separated. The analysis is conducted using Hayes (2014) process macro using 1,000 bootstrapped draws to understand the interaction between gender and creativity and the potential mediation involving life roles and goals.

Findings

The empirical results are threefold. First, the results show that creativity has a direct and positive effect on entrepreneurial intentions. Second, gender did not have a direct effect on entrepreneurial intentions, and finally, gender showed an interaction with creativity such that in both the samples, creativity had a stronger relationship with intentions among women.

Practical implications

The results point to the inclusion of creativity exercises in the entrepreneurship curriculum as well as to create and tailor programs to enhance women’s entrepreneurial intentions.

Originality/value

Using a two study constructive replication approach, this study demonstrates the complex effect of gender on entrepreneurial intentions. Traditionally, women are argued to have lower entrepreneurial intentions, but this study finds that creative women were more likely to have entrepreneurial intentions in the sample. The results also show that the women’s family salience (life roles and goals) did not mediate the relationship between gender and entrepreneurial intentions.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 58 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

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Article
Publication date: 13 February 2017

Eun Sook Kwon, Yan Shan, Joong Suk Lee and Leonard N. Reid

The authors aimed to examine the presence and character of inter- and intra-approaches to replication studies published in five leading marketing journals (Journal of

Abstract

Purpose

The authors aimed to examine the presence and character of inter- and intra-approaches to replication studies published in five leading marketing journals (Journal of Marketing, Journal of Marketing Research, Journal of Public Policy & Marketing, Marketing Science, Journal of the Academy of Marketing Science) across four decade intervals (i.e. 1980s, 1990s, 2000s and 2010/2011). The research sought answers to three research questions.

Design/methodology/approach

Content analysis of a randomly selected sample of 2,717 articles found 128 replicative studies in the journal issues. Comparisons of the replication approaches of the studies address two issues: the criticism that intra-study replication is not true replication as it is inconsistent with the criterion of researcher independence and the reported outcomes of the replicative studies relative to those of the original studies.

Findings

Overall, the presence of replications increased over time; however, the increase was attributable primarily to the number of intra-study replications published in two decades, the 2000s and 2010/2011 intervals. Conflicting findings infrequently appeared in the replication studies regardless of approach, indicating the possible existence of confirmation bias in the marketing literature.

Originality/value

Replication in marketing is either improving or stagnant depending on the accepted definition of replication. Of special importance, given the questioning of the intra-study approach as true replicative research, more replicated findings produced by independent researchers are needed to establish theoretical validity of marketing knowledge for use by both marketing academicians and decision makers.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 51 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 9 February 2015

Marc Solga, Jaqueline Betz, Moritz Düsenberg and Helen Ostermann

This paper aims to investigate the effects of political skill in a specific workplace setting – the job negotiation. The authors expected negotiator political skill to be…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate the effects of political skill in a specific workplace setting – the job negotiation. The authors expected negotiator political skill to be positively related to distributive negotiation outcome, problem-solving as a negotiation strategy to mediate this relationship and political skill to also moderate – that is amplify – the link between problem-solving and negotiation outcome.

Design/methodology/approach

In Study 1, a laboratory-based negotiation simulation was conducted with 88 participants; the authors obtained self-reports of political skill prior to the negotiation and – to account for non-independence of negotiating partners’ outcome – used the Actor–Partner Interdependence Model for data analysis. Study 2 was carried out as a real-life negotiation study with 100 managers of a multinational corporation who were given the opportunity to re-negotiate their salary package prior to a longer-term foreign assignment. Here, the authors drew on two objective measures of negotiation success, increase of annual gross salary and additional annual net benefits.

Findings

In Study 1, the initial hypothesis – political skill will be positively related to negotiator success – was fully supported. In Study 2, all three hypotheses (see above) were fully supported for additional annual net benefits and partly supported for increase of annual gross salary.

Originality/value

To the authors' best knowledge, this paper presents the first study to examine political skill as a focal predictor variable in the negotiation context. Furthermore, the studies also broaden the emotion-centered approach to social effectiveness that is prevalent in current negotiation research.

Details

International Journal of Conflict Management, vol. 26 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1044-4068

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Article
Publication date: 18 September 2009

Wayne A. Hochwarter, Laci M. Rogers, James K. Summers, James A. Meurs, Pamela L. Perrewé and Gerald R. Ferris

This paper aims to investigate the interactive effects of generational conflict and personal control (i.e. self‐regulation and political skill) on strain‐related outcomes…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate the interactive effects of generational conflict and personal control (i.e. self‐regulation and political skill) on strain‐related outcomes (i.e. job tension, and job tension and job dissatisfaction).

Design/methodology/approach

This two‐study investigation employed a survey methodology to assess the efficacy of the predictive relationships. Study 1 consisted of 390 full‐time employees in a broad range of occupations, while 199 state agency employees participated in study 2.

Findings

Generational conflict was significantly positively related to job tension (i.e. in both studies) and job dissatisfaction (i.e. in study 2). Further, for individuals higher in self‐regulation (i.e. study 1) and political skill (i.e. study 2), these effects were attenuated. That is higher self‐regulation reduced job tension in study 1, and political skill was related to decreases in job tension and job dissatisfaction across all levels of generational conflict in study 2.

Research limitations/implications

Employees with greater personal control (i.e. self‐regulation or political skill) can avoid undesirable work outcomes related to generational conflict.

Practical implications

Individuals with greater personal control (i.e. self‐regulation or political skill) will be better able to navigate generationally based conflicts to experience less job tension and greater job satisfaction.

Originality/value

The paper focussed on generational conflict as a workplace stressor and substantiates the favourable properties of political skill as a neutralizer. of dysfunctional workplace stressors.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 14 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

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Article
Publication date: 10 February 2012

Mark O'Donnell, Gary Yukl and Thomas Taber

The purpose of this paper is to determine if the relationships found between a leader's behavior and the quality of the exchange relationship with a subordinate can be…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to determine if the relationships found between a leader's behavior and the quality of the exchange relationship with a subordinate can be replicated using a different measure of leader‐member exchange (LMX) and a different sample.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper reports the result of a survey study with a sample of 239 employees who rated specific behaviors of their manager and the quality of the LMX relationship.

Findings

In a regression analysis that included several other important leader behaviors, supporting, delegating, and leading by example were statistically significant predictors of LMX.

Research limitations/implications

The findings suggest that the positive relationship found in several earlier studies between LMX and a broad measure of transformational leadership was not interpreted correctly.

Practical implications

The results from this study identify specific leader behaviors that are likely to be useful for developing a stronger exchange relationship with individual subordinates.

Social implications

The leader behaviors identified in the present study also have clear implications for the effectiveness of top executives and political leaders.

Originality/value

More types of leadership behavior were measured than in earlier LMX studies, the limitations of broadly‐defined behaviors were avoided, and a different measure of LMX was used than in most prior studies on the relationship of leader behaviors to LMX.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 27 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Keywords

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