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Article
Publication date: 19 October 2010

Francis K.W. Wong, Eddie C.M. Hui, Joe T.Y. Wong and Janice K.M. Wan

This paper seeks to examine the contributions of rehabilitation and redevelopment projects to the labour force of the construction industry in Hong Kong. Major projects…

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1489

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to examine the contributions of rehabilitation and redevelopment projects to the labour force of the construction industry in Hong Kong. Major projects from the private and public sectors were critically examined and the manpower requirements and the tangible benefits in terms of wages arising from urban renewal were forecast.

Design/methodology/approach

The forecast of the expected persons to be engaged in the construction industry is based on trend regression model. Time series data of construction sites, both private and public, and persons engaged in the past ten years were forecasted for linear trend process for the next three years. From this, a reasonable estimate of man‐days to be engaged and wages to be incurred in the construction industry in the future can be obtained.

Findings

The results provide evidence that the impacts are positive. About 19.4 million man‐days and an income of HK$16.4 billion (3.8 per cent of the nominal GDP of Hong Kong in 2008) are anticipated in the short run. To meet urban regeneration needs, the Government should develop various vocational skills and enhance motivation and job search.

Research limitations/implications

There are potential risks of error arising from the use of assumptions, limited sample size and data from the secondary resources.

Practical implications

Urban renewal works can generate more jobs. The ratio of development projects to rehabilitation works in terms of producing job opportunity by the same amount of budget is about 1 to 4.7. To meet urban regeneration needs, the Government should develop various vocational skills and enhance motivation and job search for renewal works.

Social implications

Urban renewal attracts and stimulates investment, creates employment opportunities and improves the built environment of cities. Also, public rehabilitation works can play a moderate role in stabilizing the economy and the labour market.

Originality/value

The major contributions of this paper are: the estimated labour and financial resources to undertake such renewal works; and the more significant impact of rehabilitation work identified.

Details

Facilities, vol. 28 no. 13/14
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

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Article
Publication date: 7 June 2021

Brandsford Kwame Gidigah, Kofi Agyekum and Bernard K. Baiden

Though the Public Procurement Act of Ghana makes room for specific socio-economic policies (environmental, social, economic and other policies which are intended to…

Abstract

Purpose

Though the Public Procurement Act of Ghana makes room for specific socio-economic policies (environmental, social, economic and other policies which are intended to promote social and economic impact), there is no explicit definition and provision for social value as an evaluation criterion, culminating in the absence of a definition in the Act. This paper elicits the conception and understanding of social value from stakeholders in the Ghanaian construction industry.

Design/methodology/approach

The study adopted a qualitative method that relied on a semi-structured interview of 30 participants purposively drawn from Western, Western North and Central regions of Ghana. An inductive thematic analysis approach, which involved identifying repetitions, exploring similarities and differences, noting linguistic connectors, and a framework were employed to analyse the data.

Findings

The study established no single definition or explanation for social value in the construction industry in Ghana. However, it was revealed from the study that the concept of social value could be defined from the functional perspective of the definer, particularly from the perspective of a Procurement Officer, Works Engineer, and a Quantity Surveyor. A new insight from the study that differs from the body of literature is that participants equated benefits derived from physically constructed projects as social value.

Social implications

The study has implication for public administration and practice regarding the decision-making process in the construction industry in Ghana. It provides a vital awakening on social value as a criterion in evaluating construction works procurement in Ghana. The ability of participants to equate the benefits derived from executed construction projects as social value creates a new perspective on understanding the meaning of social value in the procurement of works construction.

Originality/value

The study contributes to the state-of-the-art and ongoing discourse on the concept of social value globally. The findings create an important catalyst for social value research in the Ghanaian construction industry.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2001

CHEE H. WONG, GARY D. HOLT and PHIL HARRIS

The ‘lowest‐price wins’ philosophy has been a consistent theme of contractor selection over the years. To comprehensively elucidate this selection preference and compare…

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1153

Abstract

The ‘lowest‐price wins’ philosophy has been a consistent theme of contractor selection over the years. To comprehensively elucidate this selection preference and compare it with the use of a multi‐criteria selection (MCS) approach in the tenderer evaluation process, this paper investigates MCS tender price selection preferences. That is, project‐specific criteria (PSC) and lowest‐price wins selection practices of UK construction clients, in both building and civil engineering works at in detail via results of the empirical survey. The investigation provides further insight into the evaluation of contractors' attributes (i.e. PSC). Levels of importance assigned (LIA) for each criterion were analysed (i.e. quantitative analysis of the differences in opinions and, variance amongst the respondents) in a multivariate statistical method. Importance attached by construction clients to the ‘lowest‐price wins’ philosophy is also presented. Contrast was made between the MCS approach and the ‘lowest‐price wins’ option amongst the surveyed construction clients. It was found that increased awareness of the use of PSC prevailed amongst the survey construction clients. This indicated that cost has to be tempered with the evaluation of PSC and the attempt of construction clients searching for a new evaluation paradigm (i.e. adoption of MCS approach rather than basing on the lowest‐price wins alone).

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 8 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

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Article
Publication date: 10 July 2009

João Branco Pedro, Frits Meijer and Henk Visscher

The purpose of this paper is to provide a critical review of the building regulations and the building control system in Portugal. The organisation, content, and…

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399

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a critical review of the building regulations and the building control system in Portugal. The organisation, content, and authorities responsible for building regulations are described and an overview is provided of the main stages of the building permit procedure.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper reviews the relevant legal and regulatory provisions and discusses these in the context of commentary published by the various professional associations.

Findings

The Portuguese building regulation system has undergone significant changes in the last 20 years. Almost all building regulations currently in force are approved during that period. Some of these are resulted from the implementation of European Directives. Others are changed due to advances in scientific knowledge. Changes in the building control system have mainly been driven by the changing demands of present‐day practice, in particular, the absence of sufficient municipal technicians, and the need to expedite building control procedures. The solution has been to move away from public building control and to make private parties responsible for compliance with building regulations. The paper concludes that, although there have been significant improvements in the building regulation system over recent years, two structural problems nevertheless persist. First, building regulations continue to be complex and fragmented, and second the qualifications of technicians are still not adequately defined.

Originality/value

A structured overview of the system is provided and the main weaknesses are identified. The proposals for change are suggested by professional associations are summarised, and possible improvements are suggested.

Details

International Journal of Law in the Built Environment, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-1450

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Article
Publication date: 2 April 2019

Helen Lingard, Amanda Warmerdam and Salman Shooshtarian

In Australia, national harmonisation of occupational health and safety (OHS) regulation was pursued through the development of model Work Health and Safety legislation…

Abstract

Purpose

In Australia, national harmonisation of occupational health and safety (OHS) regulation was pursued through the development of model Work Health and Safety legislation. The model Work Health and Safety Regulations specify that construction works above a threshold cost of AU$250,000 are deemed to be construction projects requiring the appointment of a principal contractor with duties relating to OHS planning and coordination. The purpose of this paper is to explore the effectiveness of the monetary threshold as a suitable trigger for specific OHS planning and coordination duties.

Design/methodology/approach

Interviews were conducted with 46 Australian construction industry stakeholders, including union representatives, employer groups, construction firm representatives and regulators, as well as four international construction OHS experts, to explore perceptions about the effectiveness of the monetary threshold. Two construction scenarios were also modelled to test for variability in operation of the threshold by geographical location of works and design conditions.

Findings

The monetary threshold was perceived to be subject to two forms of capture problem, reflecting inadvertent capture of low risk works or failure to capture high risk works. Organisations were also reported to deliberately split contracts to avoid capture by the threshold. The cost-estimate modelling revealed inequalities and variation in the operation of the monetary threshold by geographic location and design specification.

Practical implications

The analysis suggests that limitations inherent in the use of a monetary threshold to trigger duties relating to OHS planning and coordination in construction works. Opportunities to use more sophisticated risk-based mechanisms are considered.

Originality/value

The study explores a fundamental challenge of risk-based OHS regulation, i.e., how to ensure that workers’ health and safety are adequately protected without creating an unnecessarily high regulatory burden. The research provides evidence that using a monetary value as a proxy measure for OHS risk in construction projects may be problematic.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 26 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2001

ADEKUNLE SABITU OYEGOKE

This study provides a framework for comparing construction management contracts in the UK and the US construction practices. It starts by reviewing previous studies on UK…

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1286

Abstract

This study provides a framework for comparing construction management contracts in the UK and the US construction practices. It starts by reviewing previous studies on UK and US contracting practices and explores the main delivery methods, inform of comparison with construction management contracting systems. It examines construction management contracting types, processes and procedures and interaction between the construction manager and other stakeholders. This study was based on a literature review and the result shows the similarities and differences between the American and British CM systems within each practice and between both practices; the distribution of responsibilities and risks both in pre‐construction and during the construction stages; and allocation of responsibility in both practices.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 8 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

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Article
Publication date: 17 April 2007

Low Sui Pheng

The Chinese civilization is an important part of the history of mankind. The purpose of this paper is to show that there are project management lessons to be learned from…

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3152

Abstract

Purpose

The Chinese civilization is an important part of the history of mankind. The purpose of this paper is to show that there are project management lessons to be learned from Chinese history, including that relating to the management of the building process in ancient China.

Design/methodology/approach

Through a review of the literature, this paper discusses the key management and economic practices in the building process of ancient China and highlights these practices from an important document, the Yingzao Fashi or (“Treatise on Architectural Methods”), that was compared with the modern‐day project management framework.

Findings

This paper explains the official systems instituted for public projects; the management of labour, design and planning of construction works; quantity surveying practices; the use, control and recycling of building materials; and inspection of building elements in ancient China.

Practical implications

The study suggests that lessons in the principles of construction project management in ancient China bear many similarities with the nine areas of modern‐day project management body of knowledge relating to integration, scope, time, cost, quality, human resource, communications, risk, and procurement management. An area for future research would be to compare the Yingzao Fashi with modern‐day codes of practice for building works to determine which of its “ancient” provisions relating to quality management are still relevant today.

Originality/value

It was found that much emphasis was placed by the ancient Chinese on the quality aspects of prominent building projects. This is one facet from which modern‐day project managers and clients can draw lessons.

Details

Journal of Management History, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1348

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2011

David Seth Jones

In many countries, public procurement of goods, services and works is required to serve wider social purposes apart from the needs of the user agencies (which may be…

Abstract

In many countries, public procurement of goods, services and works is required to serve wider social purposes apart from the needs of the user agencies (which may be referred to as social responsibility procurement). In recent years, reforms have been implemented in the countries of East Asia to promote social responsibility procurement. They have entailed four main types of social responsibility: (a) supporting small and medium enterprises; (b) creating opportunities for small or start up venture firms; (c) fostering environmental sustainability through green purchasing, and environmentally sustainable construction (in the case of public works); (d) promoting work safety in site management in public works. The paper will examine the reforms in the countries of the region under which various preferential arrangements have been implemented to meet these objectives. It will consider why the reforms were adopted and also the differences between the countries of the region in the priority given to each of the reforms.

Details

Journal of Public Procurement, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1535-0118

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Article
Publication date: 22 February 2021

Koki Arai

The purpose of this paper is to try to understand the relationship between price and quality in public procurement by using data on the quality of civil engineering works

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to try to understand the relationship between price and quality in public procurement by using data on the quality of civil engineering works and prices in tenders. By doing so, it tries to conduct a comprehensive examination of the quality of construction works, which has been difficult to recognize and evaluate.

Design/methodology/approach

The methodology of this analysis is to collect data on the quality of construction works from the rankings of construction performance evaluations revealed by public procurement authorities. In addition, the prices of bids of the providers in public procurement are also collected from the available data and analyzed. The relationship between the two was statistically analyzed in an objective and verifiable way.

Findings

What the study found was that the price of the work measured by the bid rate had a positive and significant relationship with the quality of the work measured by the construction performance rating. Furthermore, the panel data were analyzed using panel data for 51 firms that all appeared in the construction performance evaluation for 12 years and participated in at least three bids in each year, and the first-order term of the bid rate was negative and the second-order term was positive and was 10% significant, which is a U-shaped relationship.

Research limitations/implications

This study is one of the investigations focused on public procurement construction work. One of the limitations of this study is that it is a study of one industry in the Asian region. However, this study focuses on the incentives of business operators. As such, the analysis is applicable to all situations faced by those running businesses.

Practical implications

The managerial implications of this study include the following: although, improving the quality of construction results is costly, competitive firms are also steadily improving their quality as it is a factor of competition. However, there will come a point where their efforts come to a halt at a certain level. It is necessary to operate the business with this situation in mind. In addition to the company's efforts, it is necessary to lobby the government.

Social implications

As a policy implication for this analysis, it was possible to evaluate that steady improvement in construction results was confirmed, but the correlation between the relaxation of the competition and the increase in the bid rate was correlated with the decrease in the total amount of public works. This highlights the problem of having to think about measures for the efficient use of the. In addition to this, the fact that the competition situation has been eased can be considered as a problem that it will adversely affect the innovation stimulation of operators, and that it will become necessary to pay more attention to competition limiting acts.

Originality/value

The uniqueness of this paper is firstly that unique data representing the quality of public procurement, which had been difficult to analyze, were collected, organized and used in the study. In addition, not only did we find a positive relationship between quality and price but we also found a U-shaped relationship between them using panel data.

Details

International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

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Article
Publication date: 4 June 2021

Bradley Hughes, David J. Edwards, Igor Martek, Nicholas Chileshe and Wellington Didibhuku Thwala

A mixed philosophies epistemological design with inductive reasoning was adopted to develop new theoretical insights into the phenomena under investigation. First…

Abstract

Purpose

A mixed philosophies epistemological design with inductive reasoning was adopted to develop new theoretical insights into the phenomena under investigation. First, interpretivism was employed to contextualise the prevailing body of knowledge and source questions (and prompts) to be posed to practitioners. Second, a case study strategy (augmented by participant action research) was adopted to measure construction industry professionals' perceptions of the clerk of work's role and their impact upon both quality and safety of construction.

Design/methodology/approach

This research conducts a case study investigation of affordable and/or social home construction and examine industry's perception of the clerk of works (CoW) and their powers and responsibilities within existing legislation to impact quality of construction.

Findings

The findings illustrate that while the clerk of work's role positively impacts quality and safety of construction, it is hindered by cost and time constraints that are often prioritised. An analogy to “yield points” in materials science is then adapted to develop new theory to conceptualise the pivotal position that the CoW has in upholding quality construction. The research concludes with pragmatic recommendations (such as industry centric codes of practice) to mitigate quality and safety issues arising and signpost future academic research in this area.

Originality/value

UK construction has been criticised for prioritising costs and profits vis-à-vis quality and safety issues, as exemplified by the Grenfell fire. This study demonstrates the need for reinstatement of the CoW role in mitigating residential housing quality decline.

Details

Smart and Sustainable Built Environment, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-6099

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