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Article

Temidayo Oluwasola Osunsanmi, Clinton Ohis Aigbavboa, Ayodeji Emmanuel Oke and Muredini Liphadzi

Construction 4.0 technology has the capabilities for improving the design, management, operations and decision making of construction projects. Therefore, this study aimed…

Abstract

Purpose

Construction 4.0 technology has the capabilities for improving the design, management, operations and decision making of construction projects. Therefore, this study aimed at examining the willingness of construction professionals towards adopting construction 4.0 technologies.

Design/methodology/approach

The study adopts a survey design, and construction professionals in South Africa are assessed using a convenience sampling technique through a structured questionnaire. The questionnaire was analysed with SPSS while statistical test like; mean score, t-test and principal component analysis was used to present the data.

Findings

The findings, from the analysis, revealed that the construction professionals are willing to adopt construction 4.0 technologies for construction project. However, the possibility of fully integrating the technologies into the construction industry is low. This is because the major technologies such as; Internet of things, robotics, human-computer interaction and cyber-physical systems that encourage smart construction site are rated as not important by the construction professionals.

Practical implications

It is believed that the findings emanating from this study will serve as an indicator for investors that are interested in procuring construction 4.0 technologies for the construction industry.

Originality/value

This paper presents a framework for the application of construction 4.0 technologies for the construction industry. It also contributes to the development of digitalising construction industry in South Africa.

Details

Built Environment Project and Asset Management, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-124X

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Article

Faris Elghaish, Sandra Matarneh, Saeed Talebi, Michail Kagioglou, M. Reza Hosseini and Sepehr Abrishami

In this study, a critical literature review was utilized in order to provide a clear review of the relevant existing studies. The literature was analyzed using the…

Abstract

Purpose

In this study, a critical literature review was utilized in order to provide a clear review of the relevant existing studies. The literature was analyzed using the meta-synthesis technique to evaluate and integrate the findings in a single context.

Design/methodology/approach

Digital transformation in construction requires employing a wide range of various technologies. There is significant progress of research in adopting technologies such as unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), also known as drones, and immersive technologies in the construction industry over the last two decades. The purpose of this research is to assess the current status of employing UAVs and immersive technologies toward digitalizing the construction industry and highlighting the potential applications of these technologies, either individually or in combination and integration with each other.

Findings

The key findings are: (1) UAVs in conjunction with 4D building information modeling (BIM) can be used to assess the project progress and compliance checking of geometric design models, (2) immersive technologies can be used to enable controlling construction projects remotely, applying/checking end users’ requirements, construction education and team collaboration.

Practical implications

A detailed discussion around the application of UAVs and immersive technologies is provided. This is expected to support gaining an in-depth understanding of the practical applications of these technologies in the industry.

Originality/value

The review contributes a needed common basis for capturing progress made in UAVs and immersive technologies to date and assessing their impact on construction projects. Moreover, this paper opens a new horizon for novice researchers who will conduct research toward digitalized construction.

Details

Smart and Sustainable Built Environment, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-6099

Keywords

Content available
Article

Sepehr Alizadehsalehi and Ibrahim Yitmen

The purpose of this research is to develop a generic framework of a digital twin (DT)-based automated construction progress monitoring through reality capture to extended…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research is to develop a generic framework of a digital twin (DT)-based automated construction progress monitoring through reality capture to extended reality (RC-to-XR).

Design/methodology/approach

IDEF0 data modeling method has been designed to establish an integration of reality capturing technologies by using BIM, DTs and XR for automated construction progress monitoring. Structural equation modeling (SEM) method has been used to test the proposed hypotheses and develop the skill model to examine the reliability, validity and contribution of the framework to understand the DRX model's effectiveness if implemented in real practice.

Findings

The research findings validate the positive impact and importance of utilizing technology integration in a logical framework such as DRX, which provides trustable, real-time, transparent and digital construction progress monitoring.

Practical implications

DRX system captures accurate, real-time and comprehensive data at construction stage, analyses data and information precisely and quickly, visualizes information and reports in a real scale environment, facilitates information flows and communication, learns from itself, historical data and accessible online data to predict future actions, provides semantic and digitalize construction information with analytical capabilities and optimizes decision-making process.

Originality/value

The research presents a framework of an automated construction progress monitoring system that integrates BIM, various reality capturing technologies, DT and XR technologies (VR, AR and MR), arraying the steps on how these technologies work collaboratively to create, capture, generate, analyze, manage and visualize construction progress data, information and reports.

Details

Smart and Sustainable Built Environment, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-6099

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Article

Chukwuma Nnaji, John Gambatese, Ali Karakhan and Chinweike Eseonu

Existing literature suggests that construction worker safety could be optimized using emerging technologies. However, the application of safety technologies in the…

Abstract

Purpose

Existing literature suggests that construction worker safety could be optimized using emerging technologies. However, the application of safety technologies in the construction industry is limited. One reason for the constrained adoption of safety technologies is the lack of empirical information for mitigating the risk of a failed adoption. The purpose of this paper is to fill the research gap through identifying key factors that predict successful adoption of safety technologies.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 26 key technology adoption predictors were identified and classified using a combination of literature review and an expert panel. The level of influence for each identified safety technology adoption predictor was assessed and ranked using the Relative Importance Index. Analysis of variance was performed as well to assess the potential difference in perceived level of importance for the predictors when the study participants were clustered according to work experience and company size.

Findings

Statistical analysis indicates that 12 out of the 26 predictors identified are highly influential regarding technology adoption decision-making in construction. Technology reliability, effectiveness and durability were ranked as the most influential predictors. The participants who work for small companies and who had less than ten years of experience rated individual- and technology-related predictors significantly lower than the experienced participants working for medium and large companies.

Practical implications

The present study provides construction researchers and practitioners with valuable information regarding safety technology predictors and their magnitude, both of which are essential elements of a successful safety technology adoption process. Improved technology adoption can enhance workplace safety and minimize worker injuries, providing substantial benefits to the construction industry.

Originality/value

This study contributes to technology adoption knowledge by identifying and quantifying the influential predictors of safety technologies in relation to different organizational contexts. The study informs the need to develop an integrated conceptual model for safety technology adoption.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 26 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

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Article

Emilia L.C. van Egmond‐de Wilde de Ligny and Masi Mohammadi

The purpose of this paper is to explore the meaning, as well as the drivers, of innovation in theory and practice for gaining insight into the reasons why the diffusion of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the meaning, as well as the drivers, of innovation in theory and practice for gaining insight into the reasons why the diffusion of innovative technologies fails; even though they promise a superior performance compared to incumbent technologies. The paper describes an explorative study of the diffusion of domotics technologies in residential construction.

Design/methodology/approach

Innovation systems theory, which points to the “technological regime” in the actor network as a key element in the diffusion, acceptance, and application of new technologies was used to analyse the diffusion of domotics technologies in residential construction.

Findings

The results underscored the expected “bottlenecks” in the technological regime of the innovation system that curtailed the diffusion of domotics technologies in construction.

Originality/value

The novelty of the paper is in the approach of the research and the collected data on the technological regime amongst the stakeholders. These stakeholders were principally involved in development and implementation of the domotics technologies in residential construction; these observations provided useful insights into the diffusion of domotics technologies.

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Article

GEORGE OFORI

Construction industries in developing countries face many problems. One of these is the low level of their technological development. This paper considers how a national…

Abstract

Construction industries in developing countries face many problems. One of these is the low level of their technological development. This paper considers how a national technology policy can help improve the situation. After a brief discussion of technology and its development, construction technology development is considered. The nature of, and potential benefits from, technology policies are discussed. Ghana's experience and that of other countries in construction technology development are outlined. Courses of action for achieving progress are then indicated.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

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Article

Santosh B. Rane, Prathamesh Ramkrishana Potdar and Suraj Rane

The purpose of this paper is to identify the risks involved in the construction project based on a literature survey (LS), to develop a project risk management (PRM…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify the risks involved in the construction project based on a literature survey (LS), to develop a project risk management (PRM) framework based on Industry 4.0 technologies and to demonstrate the developed framework using Internet of Things (IoT) technology.

Design/methodology/approach

A comprehensive LS was carried out to know the different risks involved in the construction project and developed a PRM framework based on Industry 4.0 technologies to increase the effectiveness and efficiency of PRM. Heavy equipment and parameters were identified to demonstrate the developed framework based on IoT technology of Industry 4.0.

Findings

This paper demonstrates Industry 4.0 in the various stages of PRM. LS has identified 21 risks for a construction project. The demonstration of the PRM framework has identified the sudden breakdown of equipment and uncertainty of equipment as one of the critical risks associated with heavy equipment of construction project.

Research limitations/implications

The project complexity and features may add a few more risks in PRM.

Practical implications

The PRM framework based on Industry 4.0 technologies will increase the success rate of the project. It will enhance the efficiency and effectiveness of PRM.

Originality/value

The developed framework is helpful for the effective PRM of construction projects. The demonstration of PRM framework using IoT technology provides a logical way to manage risk involved in heavy equipment used in a construction project.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

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Article

Samad M.E. Sepasgozar, Steven Davis, Martin Loosemore and Leonhard Bernold

Research into the construction industry’s adoption of modern equipment technologies, such as remote-controlled trucks, excavators and drones, has been neglected in…

Abstract

Purpose

Research into the construction industry’s adoption of modern equipment technologies, such as remote-controlled trucks, excavators and drones, has been neglected in comparison to the significant body of research into the adoption of information technology in construction. Construction research has also neglected to adequately consider the important role of vendors in the innovation diffusion process, focussing mostly on the role of the customer. Set within the context of Australia’s construction industry, the purpose of this paper is to address these gaps in knowledge by exploring the role of customers and vendors in the diffusion of modern equipment technologies into the construction industry.

Design/methodology/approach

Using contemporary models of innovation diffusion which move beyond the simple dualistic problem of whether innovation is supply-pushed or demand-pulled, 19 semi-structured interviews were undertaken with customers and vendors involved in two major modern equipment technology trade exhibitions in Australia. This was followed by the collection of documentary data in the form of photos, directory books, marketing material, catalogues, websites and booth and exhibition layouts to validate the proposed model and provide insights into vendor marketing strategies. These data were analysed using both content analysis and principal component analysis (PCA).

Findings

According to the PCA and content analysis, vendor’s engagement in the adoption of modern equipment technologies falls into three stages that correspond to three stages in the customer’s adoption process. In the first stage, customers identify possible solutions and recognise new technologies following a previous recognition of a need. Vendors provide facilities for attracting potential customers and letting customers know that their technology exists and can help solve the customer’s problem. The second stage involves customers gaining knowledge about the details of the new technology, and vendors focusing on detailed knowledge transfer through written materials and demonstrations of the functionality of the new technology. In the third stage, customers have specific questions that they want answered to assist them in comparing different vendors and solutions. By this stage, vendors have built a close relationship with the customer and in contrast to earlier stages engage in two-way communication to help the customer’s decision process by addressing specific technical and support-related questions.

Originality/value

The originality and value of this research is in addressing the lack of research in modern equipment technology adoption for building construction and the lack of data on the role of vendors in the process by developing a new empirical framework which describes the stages in the process and the ways that customers and vendors interact at each stage. The results indicate that conceptually, as the construction industry becomes more industrialised, current models of innovation adoption will need to develop to reflect this growing technological complexity and recognise that vendors and customers engage differently in the adoption process, according to the type of technology they wish to adopt.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 25 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

Keywords

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Article

Jacquetta Shelton, Igor Martek and Chuan Chen

The users of construction technologies such as builders and trades people have been acknowledged as sources of potentially important innovations. These innovations may be…

Abstract

Purpose

The users of construction technologies such as builders and trades people have been acknowledged as sources of potentially important innovations. These innovations may be in the form of safer, less labour intensive, or cheaper methods and processes. The purpose of this paper is to assess whether the Australian construction industry is providing an environment where user-based innovation is being supported and implemented.

Design/methodology/approach

An explorative study was undertaken to provide an insight into actual experiences of the implementation of user-based innovation. The data were collected through face-to-face semi-structured interviews providing case studies on multiple aspects of the implementation of innovative construction technologies. The cases involved a cross section of advances, including product, tool, and system technologies.

Findings

The main motivation behind developing the technologies was problem solving. The associated industries of manufacturing and retail, as well as consultants within the construction industry present the greatest barriers to implementation.

Originality/value

This research provides a better understanding of the factors that are preventing the successful implementation of user-based innovative construction technologies in small firms.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 23 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

Keywords

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Article

Matthew Ryan Hallowell, Dylan Hardison and Matthieu Desvignes

The architecture, engineering and construction industry is known to account for a disproportionate rate of disabling injuries and fatalities. Information technologies show…

Abstract

Purpose

The architecture, engineering and construction industry is known to account for a disproportionate rate of disabling injuries and fatalities. Information technologies show promise for improving safety performance. This paper aims to describe the current state of knowledge in this domain and introduces a framework to integrate attribute-level safety risk data within existing technologies for the first time.

Design/methodology/approach

The framework is demonstrated by integrating attribute safety risk data with information retrieval, location and tracking systems, augmented reality and building information models.

Findings

Fundamental attributes of a work environment can be assigned to construction elements during design and planning. Once assigned, existing risk and predictive models can be leveraged to provide a user with objective, empirically driven feedback including quantity of safety risk, predictions of safety outcomes and clashes among incompatible attributes.

Practical implications

This framework can provide designers, planners and managers with unbiased safety feedback that increases in detail and accuracy as the project develops. Such information can support prevention through design and safety management in advanced work packaging.

Originality/value

The framework is the first to integrate empirical risk-based safety data with construction information technologies. The results provide users with insight that is unexpected, counter-intuitive or otherwise thought-provoking.

Details

Construction Innovation, vol. 16 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-4175

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