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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1994

GEORGE OFORI

Construction industries in developing countries face many problems. One of these is the low level of their technological development. This paper considers how a national…

Abstract

Construction industries in developing countries face many problems. One of these is the low level of their technological development. This paper considers how a national technology policy can help improve the situation. After a brief discussion of technology and its development, construction technology development is considered. The nature of, and potential benefits from, technology policies are discussed. Ghana's experience and that of other countries in construction technology development are outlined. Courses of action for achieving progress are then indicated.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

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Article
Publication date: 6 January 2012

Grant Kululanga

The need for capacity building of construction industries in developing countries cannot be over‐emphasised in order to ensure quality of services and products as well as…

Abstract

Purpose

The need for capacity building of construction industries in developing countries cannot be over‐emphasised in order to ensure quality of services and products as well as the application of innovative ways for delivering construction services. Accordingly, using systems institutional paradigm approach as a conceptual premise, this paper aims to make the case for a fundamental turnaround for construction developmental approach in developing countries, that identify levels which should be considered as instrumental for capacity building of the construction industry in the Sub‐Saharan region, for example Malawi.

Design/methodology/approach

To ascertain a quad‐level framework which should be considered essential for capacity building of the construction industry, a questionnaire survey was employed. Data were elicited from prominent heads of sections from five stakeholders of the construction industry that operated in Malawi on the constructs for capacity building of a construction industry. Sixty completed questionnaires were received with a response rate of 90 per cent to the designed sample size.

Findings

The quad‐level framework for capacity development of a construction industry for developing countries was validated by an overall level of 77 per cent of agreement from key and prominent heads of sections of the five stakeholders of the construction industry. The rankings of the variables for capacity building for each level of the framework have provided the key foci and orientations of the industry for one of the Southern African countries of the Sub‐Saharan region.

Research limitations/implications

The study forms the basis for further research; future research could be directed towards other developing countries to further enrich the industry on the dynamics of capacity building of construction industries in developing countries.

Originality/value

This paper is the first to critically examine the antecedents and invoke a quad‐level framework for capacity development of construction industries.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 19 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

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Article
Publication date: 3 August 2021

Mershack Opoku Tetteh, Albert P.C. Chan, Amos Darko, Sitsofe Kwame Yevu, Emmanuel B. Boateng and Janet Mayowa Nwaogu

International construction joint ventures (ICJVs) are an effective strategy for construction companies worldwide for delivering large and complex projects. Despite…

Abstract

Purpose

International construction joint ventures (ICJVs) are an effective strategy for construction companies worldwide for delivering large and complex projects. Despite numerous ICJVs studies, there is a lack of comprehensive empirical examination of what drives ICJVs implementation. This study aims to investigate the key drivers for implementing ICJVs through an international survey.

Design/methodology/approach

Grounded on a comprehensive literature review and structured questionnaire survey, 123 ICJV experts' responses from 24 different countries/jurisdictions were analyzed using inferential and descriptive statistics. Mann–Whitney U test was used to determine any divergence of ranking of the drivers by the experts. Factor analysis (FA) was used to identify the clusters underlying the key drivers. Rank agreement analysis was later used to investigate the consensus between experts from developing and developed countries/jurisdictions on their ranking of the clusters.

Findings

Out of 34 factors, 26 factors greatly drive the implementation of ICJVs. Mann–Whitney U test results prove the absence of significant disparity among the experts in the ranking of the drivers. Six clusters were obtained through factor analysis (FA), namely, market-penetration and innovation-driven drivers, legal and market-driven drivers, fiscal incentives and market expansion drivers, personal branding drivers, sustainable advantage/power drivers and industrial and organizational promotion drivers. Rank agreement analysis exhibited varied levels of concurrence between professionals from developed and developing countries/jurisdictions.

Practical implications

The appreciation of the factors motivating ICJVs is beneficial to the successful implementation of ICJV strategies. A clear understanding of the drivers can help practitioners and policymakers to customize their ICJVs to reap the expected benefits.

Originality/value

The study has generated valuable insights into the factors that are greatly driving the implementation of ICJVs worldwide. While the findings of this study provide a profound contribution to theory and practice, it contributes to sustainable growth in different perspectives.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

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Article
Publication date: 21 June 2019

Douglas Omoregie Aghimien, Clinton Ohis Aigbavboa and Wellington Didibhuku Thwala

This paper aims to present the result of an assessment of the challenges of sustainable construction (SC) in two developing countries (Nigeria and South Africa). This was…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to present the result of an assessment of the challenges of sustainable construction (SC) in two developing countries (Nigeria and South Africa). This was done with a view to improving sustainable project delivery, which is a problem among most developing countries.

Design/methodology/approach

The study adopted a quantitative survey approach with questionnaire used as the instrument for data collection from quantity surveyors, construction and project managers from both countries. Data analysis was done using a four-step analysis approach and relevant descriptive and inferential statistics were adopted.

Findings

The study revealed a considerable level of awareness of SC and involvement in the use of the same among the assessed professionals. Also, it was discovered that SC materials are mostly used in the aspect of surface finishing and masonry construction. Further findings revealed that resistance to change, client’s preference, fear of the increased cost of investment and inadequate knowledge and understanding of the concept of sustainability are some of the major challenges of SC in these countries.

Originality/value

The strength of this study lies in the assessment of happenings from two developing countries and its recommendation can to a large extent promote improved SC in developing countries particularly in Africa were construction activities are similar.

Details

Journal of Engineering, Design and Technology , vol. 17 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1726-0531

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Article
Publication date: 15 July 2021

Ayman Ahmed Ezzat Othman and Mirna Mohamed ElKady

In spite of the active role of continuous learning on improving organisational performance, the construction industry generally and architectural design firms (ADFs) in

Abstract

Purpose

In spite of the active role of continuous learning on improving organisational performance, the construction industry generally and architectural design firms (ADFs) in particular are criticised for their inability to use organisational knowledge to foster learning culture towards enhancing their performance. This paper aims to develop a framework based on knowledge management (KM) to enhance the learning culture in ADFs in developing countries.

Design/methodology/approach

To achieve the abovementioned aim, a research methodology consisted of data collection, data analysis and action required is designed to achieve four objectives. First, to examine the nature of the construction industry in developing countries, learning culture in ADFs, as well as knowledge and KM; second, to present three case studies to investigate the effectiveness of KM in enhancing the learning culture in ADFs; third, to investigate the perception and application of KM towards enhancing the learning culture in ADFs in Egypt, finally to develop a KM based framework to enhance the learning culture in ADFs in developing countries.

Findings

Through literature review, the research highlighted the fragmented nature of the architectural design process, which led to the loss of valuable information and made the process of capturing and sharing knowledge a hard task. In addition, it identified the barriers of implementing KM and the building blocks of learning culture in ADFs. Results of data analysis showed that “lack of organisational culture” and “low involvement of top management” were ranked the highest barriers for implementing KM in ADFs. Moreover, respondents mentioned that they do not share openly their information with other employees to maintain their uniqueness and that the strict working environment of their ADFs is not encouraging creativity or enhancing learning culture. Furthermore, “continuous learning and enhancement” and “experimentation, feedback and reflection” were ranked by respondents as the highest building blocks of a learning organisation.

Research limitations/implications

This research focussed on ADFs in developing countries.

Practical implications

Implementing KM strategies will facilitate the enhancement of learning culture within ADFs in developing countries. This will impact positively on improving the performance and increasing the competitiveness and market share of ADFS.

Originality/value

The research identified the barriers of KM implementation in ADFs and the building blocks of creating a learning organisations. It focusses on improving the performance of ADFs through using the capabilities of KM towards building learning culture in ADFs. The proposed framework which was designed to facilitate the implementation of KM for enhancing the learning culture in ADFs in developing countries represents a synthesis that is novel and creative in thought and adds value to the knowledge in a manner that has not previously occurred.

Details

Journal of Engineering, Design and Technology , vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1726-0531

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Article
Publication date: 20 March 2017

Bon-Gang Hwang, Xianbo Zhao and Eileen Wei Yan Chin

The purposes of this paper is twofold: first, to assess the risks associated with the international construction joint ventures (ICJVs) between Singapore and developing

Abstract

Purpose

The purposes of this paper is twofold: first, to assess the risks associated with the international construction joint ventures (ICJVs) between Singapore and developing countries and second, to investigate the risk allocation preferences in these ICJVs.

Design/methodology/approach

A questionnaire survey was conducted and responses were received from 38 firms that had participated in ICJVs with developing countries. A risk criticality (RC) index was adopted to evaluate the criticality of each risk.

Findings

The survey results reported “political instability” as the most critical risk and market-level risks were less critical than country and project-level risks. Additionally, the results showed agreement on the risk ranking between building and infrastructure ICJVs, despite significant differences in the criticalities of five risks. Furthermore, five risks were preferably allocated to host and foreign partners, respectively, while 13 risks could be shared among partners.

Research limitations/implications

First, due to the sample size, one should be cautious when interpreting and generalizing the results. Second, the RC index proposed in this study was subjective as it was influenced by the individual experience and risk attitude of the respondents. Also, the RC values were calculated without considering the weights of the respondents. Lastly, the questionnaire survey, which has been widely used in identifying risk allocation preferences, may not identify the insights of practitioners into the risk allocation practices.

Practical implications

This study provides a clear understanding of the risks associated with forming ICJVs with developing countries and the preferred risk allocation. Although, this study is focused on the risks faced by the Singapore-developing country ICJVs, the identification of the potential risks allows companies from other countries to customize their risk profile and assess the risks before they form ICJVs with developing countries.

Originality/value

As few studies have explored the risk allocation preferences in ICJVs, this study expands the literature and provides practitioners with important information for preparing joint venture contracts or agreements. Thus, this study can contribute to the literature relating to ICJVs.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 24 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

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Article
Publication date: 29 March 2021

Frank Ato Ghansah, De-Graft Owusu-Manu, Joshua Ayarkwa, David John Edwards and M. Reza Hosseini

While smart building technologies (SBTs) implementation ensures sustainability, their adoption is hampered by latent barriers, especially in project management processes…

Abstract

Purpose

While smart building technologies (SBTs) implementation ensures sustainability, their adoption is hampered by latent barriers, especially in project management processes. These latent barriers must be addressed to facilitate the successful and widespread adoption of SBTs. Therefore, this study aims to explore the significant latent barriers inhibiting the project management processes in adopting SBTs in developing countries.

Design/methodology/approach

A positivist research philosophy couched within a deductive approach was adopted to undertake a quantitative questionnaire survey of 227 project management and design team participants. Descriptive and inferential analytical tools (including a one sample T-test and exploratory factor analysis) were then adopted to interpret data collected.

Findings

The results reveal that the “high cost of smart sustainable materials and equipment” is the major significant barrier hindering the adoption of SBTs in developing countries. Latent barriers were: “structure and time-related barriers,” “construction-related barriers” and “human, policy and cost-related barriers”.

Originality/value

The study contributes novel insights into the prevailing nascent discourse on SBTs from the perspectives of construction project managers and design teams in developing countries, particularly. Furthermore, to the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first study that ascertains the significant barriers inhibiting project management processes in adopting SBTs in developing countries.

Details

Construction Innovation , vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-4175

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Article
Publication date: 10 August 2018

Douglas Omoregie Aghimien, Ayodeji Emmanuel Oke and Clinton Ohis Aigbavboa

The purpose of this paper is to determine the barriers to the adoption of value management (VM) in the construction industry of developing countries with a view to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to determine the barriers to the adoption of value management (VM) in the construction industry of developing countries with a view to providing possible measures in avoiding these barriers and increasing the usage of the system within the construction industry.

Design/methodology/approach

The level of knowledge and adoption of VM practices, as well as the barriers to its adoption in the construction industry were assessed through a survey design. Construction professionals were sampled from the six geo-political zones in Nigeria through the use of a structured questionnaire. Factor analysis was conducted on data gathered on the barriers of VM.

Findings

The study revealed a moderate level of knowledge of VM among construction professionals. This implies that the problem of VM is not that of awareness, but readiness to adopt the system. The study also reveals that the barriers to the adoption of VM can be categorised under the general stakeholder’s barriers, training and education barriers, client barriers and government/top management barriers.

Practical implications

This study was conducted across the six geo-political zones of the country as against common practice of selecting a particular region or states to represent the entire country. The findings therefore show a true reflection of the barriers to VM adoption in the country and its recommendations can to a large extent promote the adoption of VM in the country and also other developing countries where construction projects are executed through similar method, style and approach.

Originality/value

This paper highlights the possible barriers to the adoption of VM in Nigeria construction industry and provides ways to avoiding these barriers in order to achieve better quality construction and value for money.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 25 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

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Article
Publication date: 3 August 2018

Solomon Olusola Babatunde, Oluwaseyi Alabi Awodele and Onaopepo Adeniyi

Foreign direct investment (FDI) inflows to both developed and developing countries have increased over the past three decades. However, investigation of opportunities and…

Abstract

Purpose

Foreign direct investment (FDI) inflows to both developed and developing countries have increased over the past three decades. However, investigation of opportunities and challenges associated with FDI on the host economy and its impact, especially on the construction sector through empirical assessment, have received scant attention. The purpose of this study is to address this gap in knowledge within the Nigerian context and examine the trend of FDI inflows to the construction sector for the period 2000-2013 inclusive. Relationships between contributions of the construction sector to Nigeria’s gross domestic product (GDP) are also studied.

Design/methodology/approach

The study adopted a literature review, a questionnaire survey and archival data culminated in data analysis. The survey targeted financial experts in Nigerian financial institutions/local banks. Archival data included the annualised data extracted from the Central Bank of Nigeria statistical bulletins. The period examined witnessed stable economic conditions. Data collected were analysed using mean score, factor analysis and correlation.

Findings

Eight identified opportunities of using FDI were grouped into three principal factors: knowledge spillovers, capital for new investment and resilience during financial crises. The ten identified FDI challenges were grouped into three major factors: loss of ownership advantage and additional costs, crowding-out of-national firms and administrative bottleneck and overdependence. Based on the hypotheses tested, the study found a significant relationship between the contributions of FDI inflows in the construction sector and the total GDP of the host country.

Practical implications

This study provides greater insight on the effects of FDI on a host economy in developing countries, which would help policymakers to examine existing policies and look for new ways of increasing foreign investment flow, especially in the area of Construction Facility Investment.

Originality/value

This study is important because it would enable policymakers in developing countries at large to promote FDI with special considerations for the construction sector of the economy.

Details

Journal of Financial Management of Property and Construction, vol. 23 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-4387

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Article
Publication date: 29 November 2019

Justice Williams, Frank Fugar and Emmanuel Adinyira

The degree to which accidents happen or are prevented in any organisation is the function of both the health and safety culture and the safety culture maturity level of…

Abstract

Purpose

The degree to which accidents happen or are prevented in any organisation is the function of both the health and safety culture and the safety culture maturity level of the organisation. Therefore, this paper aims to determine the state of health and safety culture in the construction industry in developing economies and to assess their category on the safety maturity ladder using the Ghanaian construction industry as an example. This is to help construction companies in developing countries become conscious of the state of health and safety in the industry so they can be motivated to improve along the ladder.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 250 contractors made up of 155 building contractor,s and 95 road contractors took part in the survey. The sample size was determined by Yamane’s (1967) formula with stratified simple random sampling technique adopted in selecting the companies in the survey. This paper also uses (Guttman Scale) Scalogram analysis to measure the state of health and safety culture in the Ghanaian construction industry.

Findings

The results show that health and safety culture of the Ghanaian construction industry is at the first level, the pathological stage. Even though Ghanaian contractors have health and safety policies and codes of conduct in place, safety is not seen as a key business risk. Consequently, management and most frontline staff do not emphasise the importance of integration of safety measures in the various activities on the site. Thus, safety is not seen as unavoidable and a part of the construction activity.

Practical implications

The findings of this study inform state authorities, consultants and contractors of areas that they need to focus more on improving health and safety culture in developing countries. This would go a long way in protecting construction workers in the industry.

Originality/value

This study, to the best of the authors’ current knowledge, is the first of its kind in the Ghanaian construction industry. The study brings to the fore the actual state of health and safety in the construction industry in developing countries such as Ghana. The value of the findings lies in the fact that it will provide the motivation for construction companies in developing countries to develop a commitment to safety, and to provide appropriate and effective safety improvement techniques to progress to the subsequent stages of the safety culture maturity ladder.

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