Search results

1 – 10 of over 7000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 5 May 2020

Ellen Daniëls, Annie Hondeghem and Jan Heystek

The purpose of this paper is to offer insight into school leaders' and teachers' perspectives on leadership behaviour and its impact on their mutual relationships…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to offer insight into school leaders' and teachers' perspectives on leadership behaviour and its impact on their mutual relationships. Research papers that include perspectives from both school leaders and teachers are relatively scarce in the field of education. However, it is important to take account of both perspectives because if they align, school leaders can be expected to be more successful. Moreover, positive teacher perceptions about school leaders result in lower levels of teacher burnout and enhanced teacher collaboration.

Design/methodology/approach

The current study employed qualitative data drawn from 24 primary schools in Belgium. The data set was assembled from 24 interviews with school leaders and 22 focus groups with teachers. The research analyses the interviews and focus groups from an inductive approach in order to let theory emerge, to refine existing theories in the field of education and to get an in-depth understanding of agreements and disagreements in the perspectives of school leaders and teachers.

Findings

The results show that school leaders and teachers perceive school leadership principally as relation- and task-oriented. However, there are differences in the perceptions about the subcategories of relation-oriented behaviour between school leaders and teachers. School leaders refer to consulting with members when making decisions and providing feedback. On the other hand, teachers indicate the importance of support and encouragement and recognition. The perceptions of the relationships between school leaders and teachers seem to match, with both valuing trust, openness and contribution.

Originality/value

This study addresses the relative scarcity of research relating to school leaders’ and teachers’ perspectives regarding school leadership. The study clarifies concepts in order to facilitate further research on school leaders' effectiveness.

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 58 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 25 January 2021

Tahseen Anwer Arshi, Venkoba Rao, Sumithra Viswanath and Vazeerjan Begum

The study aims to develop measures for innovation effectiveness impacting organizational performance outcomes. Substantial evidence suggests that measuring innovation…

Abstract

Purpose

The study aims to develop measures for innovation effectiveness impacting organizational performance outcomes. Substantial evidence suggests that measuring innovation effectiveness (IE) continues to be challenging because of the use of different measures across innovation’s broad spectrum. The purpose of this study is to overcome it by examining multiple drivers of IE in emerging market economies (EMEs) and predicting their impact on financial and nonfinancial performance outcomes.

Design/methodology/approach

Through a two-wave panel design, firms from India, Oman and the United Arab Emirates participated in the study with a time lapse of 12 months (T1n = 417, T2n = 403). Four cross-lagged competing models are tested for autoregressive, causal, reversed and reciprocal effects using structural equation modeling (SEM).

Findings

The findings show that the synergistic effect of multiple innovation characteristics, such as innovation degree, cost, frequency and speed determines its endogenous effectiveness. The exogenous effectiveness of innovation is further established through its impact on financial and nonfinancial performance outcomes. Furthermore, readiness for innovation (RFI) is a critical factor that moderates the relationship between drivers and IE.

Practical implications

The study’s findings could inform practitioners in emerging market economies about the appropriate measures of IE. It will guide managerial decisions on making an investment, evaluation, accountability and strategic choices related to innovation.

Originality/value

It is one of the first studies that use a time-based lens to examine IE in EMEs. It posits that given the innovation’s complexity, IE needs to be measured at multiple levels. The study explains how evolutionary dynamics in different sociocultural contexts can bring a new perspective into theory of diffusion of innovation. The moderating role of RFI brings new insights into the IE process and emphasizes its importance in objective-driven and performance-focused innovation efforts.

Details

International Journal of Innovation Science, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-2223

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 18 December 2019

Cailing Feng, Mulyadi Robin, Lisan Fan and Xiaoyu Huang

Commitment to change is vital for the success of any organizational change initiative. However, despite a sustained increase in research interest on employees’ commitment…

Abstract

Purpose

Commitment to change is vital for the success of any organizational change initiative. However, despite a sustained increase in research interest on employees’ commitment to change, there is still no consistency about the unidimensional or multi-dimensional construct of commitment to change, and previous research tends to ignore the impact vocational drivers may have on it. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing on prospect theory, the authors extended Herscovitch and Meyer’s (2002) commitment to change construct by developing and testing an additional dimension of commitment to change centered on employees’ vocational commitment across two studies, adopting a longitudinal design within a Chinese context. As organizational change often has implications that impacts individual decision making, vocational development and work adjustments and attitudes within the workplace, the authors presented the case for vocational commitment to change as an important extension to the commitment to change literature. The authors first provided evidence for the internal consistency, factor structure and the validity of the commitment to change in the Chinese context. Subsequently, the authors examined the changes of employees’ commitment to change across time, and demonstrated its predictive validity by exploring the relationship between commitment to change and change-related behaviors.

Findings

The current research represents improvements in commitment to change measurement, provides construct clarification in the Asia context, and sheds light on theoretical and empirical evidence for how to support change in the Chinese context. Limitations, implications and directions for future research are further discussed.

Originality/value

The current study responds to a call for research to further investigate the mechanisms of commitment to change within non-Western contexts, specifically within the Chinese context. Through a rigorous scale development process, the authors clarified Herscovitch and Meyer’s (2002) commitment to change model and present an augmented model with a fourth dimension –vocational commitment to change. Furthermore, through a longitudinal study, the current study also demonstrates that the cultivation of commitment to change has great importance to improving employees’ change-supportive behavior and reducing their resistance to change. This is consistent with cross-cultural research, which shows that Chinese individuals are more likely to possess inconsistent attitudes toward an object, including themselves, compared to Western individuals (Spencer-Rodgers et al., 2004). The study also explained the change of commitment to change over time, showing the significant relationships among the commitment to change and change-related behaviors.

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 2 January 2020

Ahmad Bayiz Ahmad, Bangcheng Liu and Atif Saleem Butt

The purpose of this paper is to develop a standardized, psychometrically sound instrument for the emerging construct of change recipient proactivity (CRP), using a…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop a standardized, psychometrically sound instrument for the emerging construct of change recipient proactivity (CRP), using a deductive approach.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a systematic item-development framework as a guide (i.e. item generation, questionnaire administration, item reduction and scale evaluation) and based on a sample of 414 white-collar employees, this paper discusses the development and validation of an instrument that can be used to measure change recipient’s proactive behavioral responses to planned change efforts.

Findings

Results suggest that our proposed CRP scale is internally consistent (reliable) and valid in that it is conceptually distinct from, yet empirically correlated with neighboring constructs such as affective commitment to change, readiness for change and proactive personality.

Research limitations/implications

The findings illustrate that change recipients can demonstrate proactive behaviors in response to change efforts. However, this study’s contribution is only a first step, requiring further theoretical and methodological refinement of the scale in different contexts.

Originality/value

The deductive nature of our study resulted in a comprehensive and domain-specific scale assessing recipients’ proactive responses to organizational change efforts. This opens doors to empirical studies on examining the conditions under which change recipients “may” step outside the boundaries of passivity to respond positively and proactivity to organizational change efforts.

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 18 May 2021

The purpose of the study was to develop and validate an integrative measure of commitment to change using a mixed-methods approach. Changes in employees' commitment to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the study was to develop and validate an integrative measure of commitment to change using a mixed-methods approach. Changes in employees' commitment to change over time were examined.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a longitudinal study using participants in China. The researchers used a mixed-methods design.

Findings

Three hypotheses were supported: 1. Initial and later commitment to change were positively correlated 2. Commitment to change and change supportive behaviour was positively correlated 3. Initial commitment to change was negatively related to resistance to change.

Research limitations/implications

Construct clarification can be further examined across cultures to make its cross-cultural validity clearer. The research uses participants from a Chinese context and adds significantly to understanding of commitment to change in this culture.

Practical implications

Employers would do well to attend to the needs and interests of employees who have higher vocational commitment to change.

Originality/value

This research report gives data from participants from a Chinese cultural background which gives new information regarding vocational commitment to change and opens new areas for further research.

Details

Development and Learning in Organizations: An International Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7282

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 2 May 2017

Victoria Bellou and Andreas Andronikidis

Given the polyphony around service orientation related constructs coming from both Marketing and Organizational Behavior researchers, the first purpose of this paper is to…

Abstract

Purpose

Given the polyphony around service orientation related constructs coming from both Marketing and Organizational Behavior researchers, the first purpose of this paper is to delineate the construct of service orientation, and second, recognizing the focal role of employees for offering services of high quality, it investigates the complex relationship between service orientation and job satisfaction.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper draws upon theories and arguments from marketing and organizational behavior to identify “organizational service orientation” (OSO) as a common basis for both scholarships. Grounded on the review of the impact of OSO and job satisfaction constructs to each other, the authors develop research propositions, and discuss implications of the proposed relationships for both.

Findings

The paper explicates the positive impact of OSO on job satisfaction but also puts forward a positive influence of job satisfaction on OSO, suggesting hence a reciprocal relationship between the two.

Originality/value

First, this paper offers construct clarification for OSO, bridging disciplinary and audience divides. Second, it argues over the reciprocal relationship between OSO and job satisfaction, indicating the necessity to invest on maximizing both constructs in order to ultimately optimize the service experience of customers.

Details

EuroMed Journal of Business, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1450-2194

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 25 September 2019

Guilherme F. Frederico, Jose Arturo Garza-Reyes, Anthony Anosike and Vikas Kumar

Industry 4.0 is one of the most emergent research topics attracting significant interest by researchers as well as practitioners. Many articles have been published with…

Abstract

Purpose

Industry 4.0 is one of the most emergent research topics attracting significant interest by researchers as well as practitioners. Many articles have been published with regards Industry 4.0; however, there is no research that clearly conceptualizes Industry 4.0 in the context of supply chain. This paper aims to propose the term “Supply Chain 4.0” together with a novel conceptual framework that captures the essence of Industry 4.0 within the supply chain context. As Industry 4.0 is inherently a revolution, and as revolutions are evolutionary, this research also aims to capture the evolution of Supply Chain 4.0 from maturity levels perspective to facilitate the formulation and development of Supply Chain 4.0 strategy.

Design/methodology/approach

Following a deductive research approach and a qualitative strategy, a systematic literature review (SLR) was adopted as the research method seeking to understand the relationships among supply chain, Industry 4.0 and maturity levels research. The three phases of the SLR process utilized are: planning, conducting and reporting. A concept-oriented technique was applied to the outputs of the SLR to obtain the key constructs that would facilitate the development of the conceptual Supply Chain 4.0 framework.

Findings

The SLR showed that there is limited research linking Industry 4.0 to supply chain. Nevertheless, it was possible to extract a set of thematic categories from the analysis of the articles which are referred to as constructs as they form the core of the conceptual Supply Chain 4.0 framework. These constructs are managerial and capability supporters, technology levers, processes performance requirements and strategic outcomes. Each of these constructs consists of a number of elements which are referred to as “dimensions” in this research and a total of 21 dimensions were identified during the SLR. The SLR also demonstrated that maturity propositions for Industry 4.0 are still embrionary and entirely missing in the context of supply chain. Hence, this research develops and proposes a maturity levels framework that is underpinned by the core constructs of Supply Chain 4.0 and the corresponding dimensions. As these proposed frameworks are conceptual, this research also identifies and proposes several research directions to help fortify the Supply Chain 4.0 concept.

Research limitations/implications

This research argues that the frameworks are robust because the constructs and dimensions are grounded in the literature, thus demonstrating both theoretical and practical relevance and value. As Supply Chain 4.0 research is still in infancy, there is a range of open research questions suggested based on the frameworks that could serve as guides for researchers to further develop the Supply Chain 4.0 concept. Also, practitioners can use this framework to develop better understanding of Supply Chain 4.0 and be able to evaluate the maturity of their organizations. As the proposed frameworks are conceptual, they require further empirical research to validate them and obtain new insights.

Originality/value

The SLR demonstrated a clear gap in literature with regards to Industry 4.0 in the context of supply chain, and also in the context of Industry 4.0 maturity levels for supply chain. This research is unique as it formulates and introduces novel frameworks that close these gaps in literature. The value of this research lies in the fact that it makes significant contribution in terms of understanding of Supply Chain 4.0 with a clear set of constructs and dimensions that form Supply Chain 4.0, which provides the foundation for further work in this area.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 25 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 5 November 2015

Elizabeth C. Vozzola, Paul A. Cimbala and Karen Palmunen

Moral exemplars provide us with important case studies of optimal moral flourishing. Although most historians rate Abraham Lincoln as the most moral American president…

Abstract

Moral exemplars provide us with important case studies of optimal moral flourishing. Although most historians rate Abraham Lincoln as the most moral American president, their analyses do not utilize the perspective of moral development theory or research. This project asked whether such a perspective could contribute to a better understanding of Lincoln’s abundantly well-examined self and actions. This study examined the moral self of U.S. President Abraham Lincoln through close textual analysis of his brief autobiographical writings and his ethical turning point, his 1854 Peoria Speech attacking the morality of slavery. Even the limited sample of one major speech and three brief writings about life events provided evidence for the usefulness of McAdams’ method of examining life narratives for central themes and textual elements and for Colby and Damon’s (1992) method of interviewing exemplars and identifying common traits. Our methods allowed for no carefully constructed interview or clarification questions but rather relied on historical texts constructed for political goals. Major figures in the exploration of moral selves suggest that the centrality of morality to people’s sense of self lies at the heart of moral motivation and action. Studies of historical moral exemplars provide individuals and organizations with powerful role models for optimal ethical functioning and highlight the importance of fostering the centrality of morality in organizational leaders.

Details

The Ethical Contribution of Organizations to Society
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-446-1

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 23 June 2020

David R. Ellis, Kaye Thorn and Christian Yao

While there is a burgeoning literature on self-initiated expatriates (SIEs), the emphasis has been on expatriation not repatriation. The purpose of this paper therefore is…

Abstract

Purpose

While there is a burgeoning literature on self-initiated expatriates (SIEs), the emphasis has been on expatriation not repatriation. The purpose of this paper therefore is to explore how repatriating SIEs perceive the experience of repatriation compared with their pre-repatriation expectations. Further, we examine the seminal work of Black et al. (1992) in the light of current day realities.

Design/methodology/approach

This qualitative research draws on interviews with SIE New Zealanders returning home. It is an exploratory longitudinal study, based on interview data collected prior to (n = 32), and after (n = 27) repatriation, comparing expectations and experiences of repatriation.

Findings

Findings show that there is a strong level of congruence between the expectations of the return and their experience of repatriation. This congruence eases the transition and mitigates the impact of reverse culture shock. We revise Black et al.'s framework of repatriation adjustment to more accurately reflect the expectations and experiences of repatriating SIEs, recognising the importance of individual agency and the impact of today's technological advances on repatriation.

Research limitations/implications

The contributions of this paper include clarification of repatriating SIEs. Further, through the revision of the framework, we identify new areas of research that would aid our understanding of repatriating SIEs and lead to the development of a more detailed model. We highlight the interplay between variables showing how these might mitigate the shock of repatriation.

Originality/value

Repatriation is an under-researched phase of the SIE, and this study provides empirical data that contributes to our understanding of the construct. Black et al.'s framework of repatriation adjustment is revised in the context of contemporary SIE, highlighting the holistic nature of self-initiated expatriation and repatriation, viewing the events not as discrete, but as a continuum of time.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 25 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 24 July 2020

Francis J. Yammarino, Minyoung Cheong, Jayoung Kim and Chou-Yu Tsai

For many of the current leadership theories, models, and approaches, the answer to the question posed in the title, “Is leadership more than ‘I like my boss’?,” is “no,”…

Abstract

For many of the current leadership theories, models, and approaches, the answer to the question posed in the title, “Is leadership more than ‘I like my boss’?,” is “no,” as there appears to be a hierarchy of leadership concepts with Liking of the leader as the primary dimension or general factor foundation. There are then secondary dimensions or specific sub-factors of liking of Relationship Leadership and Task Leadership; and subsequently, tertiary dimensions or actual sub-sub-factors that comprise the numerous leadership views as well as their operationalizations (e.g., via surveys). There are, however, some leadership views that go beyond simply liking of the leader and liking of relationship leadership and task leadership. For these, which involve explicit levels of analysis formulations, often beyond the leader, or are multi-level in nature, the answer to the title question is “yes.” We clarify and discuss these various “no” and “yes” leadership views and implications of our work for future research and personnel and human resources management practice.

Details

Research in Personnel and Human Resources Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-076-1

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 7000