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Article
Publication date: 24 August 2021

Ashleigh Powell, Constantino Stavros and Angela Dobele

Understanding how to predict and manage the spread of negative brand-relevant content is of critical concern to marketers. This paper aims to contribute to this…

Abstract

Purpose

Understanding how to predict and manage the spread of negative brand-relevant content is of critical concern to marketers. This paper aims to contribute to this understanding by building on existing anti-branding, brand hate and word-of-mouth literature to explore the factors that lead individuals to engage in the transmission of negative brand-relevant information via social media.

Design/methodology/approach

A two-phase exploratory design was used. The first stage involved an analysis of negative transmission via comments left on news and brand posts. The second phase of the research involved a series of 13 depth interviews with frequent social media users about their negative brand-relevant transmission behavior to add richness and depth to the findings from the passive observation in the first phase of the research.

Findings

The first phase of the research demonstrated that negative transmission can be both brand-related (e.g. driven by-product or service failure or corporate irresponsibility) and consumer-related (e.g. driven by self or social motives). The second phase of the research clarified that negative transmission often occurs in the absence of brand hate, particularly when it can be used as a covert method of self-enhancement for the transmitter via downward social comparisons.

Originality/value

Negative transmission as a form of anti-branding that is more strongly self-related (as opposed to brand) is established, progressing understanding and applications of contemporary media channels. Implications, including how brand-generated controversy and consumer reinforcement can be used to manage negative transmission, are offered.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 19 February 2019

Tony Cooper, Constantino Stavros and Angela R. Dobele

The purpose of this study is to empirically examine the manner in which companies mitigate negative sentiment in social media and to map the forces that may lead to…

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2160

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to empirically examine the manner in which companies mitigate negative sentiment in social media and to map the forces that may lead to pre-emptive strategies.

Design/methodology/approach

Case studies were drawn from the retail fashion industry using data collected from semi-structured, in-depth interviews with practitioners and a netnographic examination of company artefacts and social media conversations.

Findings

The findings identify five principal domains of influence upon which the firms based their approach to social media negativity. The authors suggest that these domains can be fundamentally categorised as either relational domains built on human exchanges or transformational domains rooted in less tangible elements of corporate culture and operational practices that can have a significant impact upon a brand’s socially mediated exchanges.

Practical implications

The research provides guidance based on empirical observation of effective strategies utilised by firms, emphasising robust systems integration, a holistic management ethos, and leveraging of third-party alliances.

Originality/value

Bringing together disparate cross-disciplinary elements, the research contributes to knowledge by highlighting opportunities for the development of a proactive rather than reactive approach to online brand negativity and deepens the understanding of applied brand management techniques adopted to address negative social media encounters. The authors provide a series of contemporary and empirically grounded recommendations for practitioners that offer substantive insights.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 28 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

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Article
Publication date: 11 September 2017

Ashleigh Ellen Powell, Adrian R. Camilleri, Angela R. Dobele and Constantino Stavros

The purpose of this research was to create a brief scale to measure perceived social benefit that would be appropriate for use in future research aiming to explore the…

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1014

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research was to create a brief scale to measure perceived social benefit that would be appropriate for use in future research aiming to explore the role of this variable in determining word-of-mouth (WOM) behaviour. There is evidence that perceived social risk negatively impacts the willingness to share, but the role of perceived social benefit has not yet been explored. Understanding how perceived social risk and benefit interact to determine WOM will inform social marketing campaign design.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper outlines two studies: Study 1 was concerned with the development of the perceived social benefit of sharing scale (PSBSS), including the construction of preliminary items and the reliability and discriminant validity of the final scale. Study 2 involved an investigation of the concurrent validity of the PSBSS in relation to the likelihood to share.

Findings

Study 1 demonstrated that the perceived social benefit associated with WOM was related to social approval, impression management and social bonding. The results of Study 2 established that scores on the PSBSS predicted self-reported likelihood to engage in both face-to-face WOM and electronic WOM.

Originality/value

The PSBSS can be used to examine the role of perceived social benefit, including how the interaction between perceived social risk and benefit determines where, when and with whom people will share WOM.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 34 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 3 January 2017

Kate Westberg, Constantino Stavros, Aaron C.T. Smith, Joshua Newton, Sophie Lindsay, Sarah Kelly, Shenae Beus and Daryl Adair

This paper aims to extend the literature on wicked problems in consumer research by exploring athlete and consumer vulnerability in sport and the potential role that…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to extend the literature on wicked problems in consumer research by exploring athlete and consumer vulnerability in sport and the potential role that social marketing can play in addressing this problem.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper conceptualises the wicked problem of athlete and consumer vulnerability in sport, proposing a multi-theoretical approach to social marketing, incorporating insights from stakeholder theory, systems theory and cocreation to tackle this complex problem.

Findings

Sport provides a rich context for exploring a social marketing approach to a wicked problem, as it operates in a complex ecosystem with multiple stakeholders with differing, and sometimes conflicting, objectives. It is proposed that consumers, particularly those that are highly identified fans, are key stakeholders that have both facilitated the problematic nature of the sport system and been rendered vulnerable as a result. Further, a form of consumer vulnerability also extends to athletes as the evolution of the sport system has led them to engage in harmful consumption behaviours. Social marketing, with its strategic and multi-faceted focus on facilitating social good, is an apt approach to tackle behavioural change at multiple levels within the sport system.

Practical implications

Sport managers, public health practitioners and policymakers are given insight into the key drivers of a growing wicked problem as well as the potential for social marketing to mitigate harm.

Originality/value

This paper is the first to identify and explicate a wicked problem in sport. More generally it extends insight into wicked problems in consumer research by examining a case whereby the consumer is both complicit in, and made vulnerable by, the creation of a wicked problem. This paper is the first to explore the use of social marketing in managing wicked problems in sport.

Details

Journal of Social Marketing, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-6763

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 12 July 2021

Constantino Stavros, Kate Westberg, Roslyn Russell and Marcus Banks

Service captivity is described as the experience of constrained choice whereby a consumer has no power and feels unable to exit a service relationship. This study aims to…

Abstract

Purpose

Service captivity is described as the experience of constrained choice whereby a consumer has no power and feels unable to exit a service relationship. This study aims to explore how positive service experiences can contribute to service captivity in the alternative financial services (AFS) sector for consumers experiencing financial vulnerability.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 31 interviews were undertaken with Australian consumers of payday loans and/or consumer leases.

Findings

The authors reveal a typology of consumers based on their financial vulnerability and their experience with AFS providers. Then they present three themes relating to how the marketing practices of these providers create a positive service experience, and, in doing so, can contribute to service captivity for consumers experiencing financial vulnerability.

Research limitations/implications

The benefits derived from positive service experiences, including accessible solutions, self-esteem, and a sense of control over their financial situation, contribute to the service captivity of some consumers, rendering alternative avenues less attractive.

Practical implications

AFS providers must ensure a socially responsible approach to their marketing practices to minimize potentially harmful outcomes for consumers. However, a systems-level approach is needed to tackle the wider issue of financial precarity. Policymakers need to address the marketplace gaps, regulatory frameworks and social welfare policies that contribute to both vulnerability and captivity.

Originality/value

This research extends the understanding of service captivity by demonstrating how positive service experiences can perpetuate this situation. Further, specific solutions are proposed at each level of the service system to address service captivity in the AFS sector.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 35 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2008

Kate Westberg, Constantino Stavros and Bradley Wilson

This study examines the impact of transgressions committed by team members in professional sport on the sports organisation's relationship with its sponsors. In-depth…

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216

Abstract

This study examines the impact of transgressions committed by team members in professional sport on the sports organisation's relationship with its sponsors. In-depth interviews were conducted with sporting administrators to identify potential moderators and responses that may occur as a result of different types of player transgressions. The conceptual model that was developed assimilates our qualitative results with the latest cross-disciplinary transgression literature to frame a model uniquely contextualised for player transgressions.

Details

International Journal of Sports Marketing and Sponsorship, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1464-6668

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 12 June 2009

Constantino Stavros and Kate Westberg

The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the contribution of qualitative methods and techniques in extending the understanding of relationship marketing theory.

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5538

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the contribution of qualitative methods and techniques in extending the understanding of relationship marketing theory.

Design/methodology/approach

The study investigated six Australian sporting organisations using multiple data collection methods including semi‐structured interviews with several senior executives within each organisation, secondary and historical data sources and participant observation. The application of triangulation and multiple case studies is discussed in relation to their contribution toward a greater understanding of relationship marketing practice in the professional sport industry, as well as the barriers to the adoption of this strategy.

Findings

Using triangulation and a multiple case study approach provided a richness of information which, upon analysis within and across cases, revealed a number of commonalities and some limited diversity. Using this approach maximised the depth of information and increased the transferability of the findings to allow for the development of a conceptual model, which advances relationship‐marketing theory.

Originality/value

Triangulation has not been used extensively in case study research nor has a multiple case study approach been commonly applied to the sport industry. This paper deconstructs the methods and their subsequent contribution to the findings of this study.

Details

Qualitative Market Research: An International Journal, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-2752

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2006

Con Stavros

The Victorian Major Events Company (VMEC), located in Melbourne, Australia, declares its mission as being “to attract major events of international significance to…

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105

Abstract

The Victorian Major Events Company (VMEC), located in Melbourne, Australia, declares its mission as being “to attract major events of international significance to Melbourne and the State of Victoria”. VMEC is considered a world leader in its field. Peter Abraam (PA), interviewed by Con Stavros (CS), explains the role of VMEC in maintaining Melbourne's position as 'sporting capital of the world' in the context of global events development, the involvement of government sponsors and use of best practice, as demonstrated through the Formula One Grand Prix.

Details

International Journal of Sports Marketing and Sponsorship, vol. 7 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1464-6668

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 13 July 2015

Matthew D. Meng, Constantino Stavros and Kate Westberg

The ubiquity of social media provides sport organizations with opportunities to communicate with fans and as a result, potentially strengthen team identification. The…

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3555

Abstract

Purpose

The ubiquity of social media provides sport organizations with opportunities to communicate with fans and as a result, potentially strengthen team identification. The purpose of this paper is to contribute to emerging research on the nature of social media use by sport organizations by examining the platforms adopted over a three-year period by National Basketball Association (NBA) teams and the way in which social media is used to communicate and engage with fans.

Design/methodology/approach

A content analysis was used to examine online comments posted by all 30 teams in the NBA on Facebook and Twitter during the off-season.

Findings

The results demonstrate that NBA teams have embraced social media, primarily using four different types of communication to engage fans: Informing, Marketing, Personalizing and Activating.

Practical implications

The authors establish that social media is an effective vehicle for sport organizations to engage with fans and to enhance team identification. The data suggests that teams should make a concerted effort in their communications, where possible, to personalize communications, genuinely inform and involve fans and provide relevant marketing communications, all of which can be effectively implemented within existing marketing efforts.

Originality/value

This is the first study to examine the direct use of social media by sport organizations and its potential for enhancing team identification.

Details

Sport, Business and Management: An International Journal, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-678X

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 12 June 2009

Adam Lindgreen and Martin Hingley

Downloads
861

Abstract

Details

Qualitative Market Research: An International Journal, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-2752

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