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Article
Publication date: 5 September 2008

Maria Salamoura, Vasilis Angelis, John Kehagias and Constantine Lymperopoulos

The purpose of this paper is to provide insights into the relationship between quality and accessibility, as selective influencing parameters of new product acceptance for…

1542

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide insights into the relationship between quality and accessibility, as selective influencing parameters of new product acceptance for Greek, fast moving, and consumer products.

Design/methodology/approach

The data for this study come from a mail questionnaire sent to 680 executives operating in Greek enterprises, by using a combination of sampling criteria (advertising budget, turnover). Non‐parametric tests (Wilcoxon, Spearman, Kruskal‐Wallis and Pearson χ2) were used, together with descriptive measures to test the hypotheses.

Findings

The results indicate that quality (usage/support) is a more important factor than Accessibility (economic/physical) in the formation of a “new product acceptance function”. Furthermore, usage quality is more important than support quality, while economic accessibility is more important than physical accessibility.

Research limitations/implications

The research limitations refer to the fact that the justification of the hypotheses in connection with the executive‐based approach followed has not been found to have any precedents. In addition, a multi, rather than single, source identification process was used for the new product acceptance factors.

Practical implications

For marketers, research of the conceptualization of the “acceptance function” acts as a basis for building a new products' marketing plan focused on the consumer, in a way which reflects the company characteristics, as well as the particular market conditions.

Originality/value

This paper is exploring new ground in that it isolates and examines the substitution between quality and accessibility as selective influencing parameters of acceptance for new fast moving consumer goods in Greece.

Details

Managing Service Quality: An International Journal, vol. 18 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-4529

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 20 March 2009

Ioannis E. Chaniotakis and Constantine Lymperopoulos

This paper aims to study the effect of service quality (SQ) dimensions on satisfaction and word of mouth (WOM) for maternities in Greece.

6912

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to study the effect of service quality (SQ) dimensions on satisfaction and word of mouth (WOM) for maternities in Greece.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on Parasuraman et al.'s SERVQUAL variables, the authors tried to identify the effects of each variable to satisfaction and WOM. Data were collected through field research among 1,000 mothers who have given birth to a child during the last five years, and the data were analysed using SEM.

Findings

The results suggest that, in addition to “satisfaction”, the only service quality dimension that directly affects WOM, is “empathy”. In addition, “empathy” affects “responsiveness”, “assurance” and “tangibles” which in turn have only an indirect effect to WOM through “satisfaction”.

Research limitations/implications

Limitations relate to the use of a non‐probability sample and the restricted geographical area of the field research. This study contributes to the body of academic knowledge by shedding more light into the role of SQ dimensions, and especially “empathy”, in the WOM for maternities.

Practical implications

An understanding of the effect of SQ dimensions in satisfaction and WOM is important to maternities' marketing managers because it offers them the opportunity to take certain actions for improving customers' satisfaction and increase their intention to use positive WOM.

Originality/value

The paper manages to identify the effects of SQ dimensions on satisfaction and WOM, especially in the health care marketing sector.

Details

Managing Service Quality: An International Journal, vol. 19 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-4529

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 24 August 2010

Ioannis E. Chaniotakis, Constantine Lymperopoulos and Magdalini Soureli

Each own‐label product enjoys different levels of customer acceptance and perceived risk and requires different attention with respect to the different elements of the…

6165

Abstract

Purpose

Each own‐label product enjoys different levels of customer acceptance and perceived risk and requires different attention with respect to the different elements of the marketing mix. This paper explores the factors affecting consumers' intentions to buy an own‐label premium food product. More specifically, this study focuses on the case of own‐label olive oil.

Design/methodology/approach

The research involved a review of the available literature on factors affecting consumer attitudes towards own‐label products. For the collection of data, a survey was designed and conducted in the greater area of Athens, Greece. The research questionnaire was administered by means of personal interviews to 799 consumers.

Findings

Data analysis results, using structural equation modelling, showed that consumers' purchase intention is directly affected by consumers' attitudes towards own‐label olive oil, which in turn are influenced by consumers' perceived benefits, economic situation, brand loyalty and trust. Moreover, the level of income has a direct negative impact on both consumer attitudes and purchase intention.

Research limitations/implications

Limitations relate to the use of non‐probability sample and the restricted geographical area of the field research.

Originality/value

Considering that own‐label products' quality is questionable, this study contributes to the academic body of knowledge, by examining consumers' perceptions about a premium own‐label food product. By testing existing knowledge in a new context, the paper makes incremental contribution to the knowledge on own‐label products, and provides insights for practitioners.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 19 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 3 May 2013

Constantine Lymperopoulos, Ioannis E. Chaniotakis and Magdalini Soureli

The financial services market is constantly changing in terms of both competition and consumer behaviour. Customer switching is increasing, while bank marketers attempt to…

2478

Abstract

Purpose

The financial services market is constantly changing in terms of both competition and consumer behaviour. Customer switching is increasing, while bank marketers attempt to maintain a loyal customer base, in order for the banks to survive and be profitable. The aim of this research was to provide deeper insight into the direct effect of price satisfaction as expressed by its various dimensions on bank customer switching behaviour.

Design/methodology/approach

The research involved a review of the literature on factors affecting customer switching behaviour, with a particular emphasis on the role of price. In order to obtain the necessary data, a survey was designed and conducted in the greater Athens area. The questionnaire was administered to 306 bank customers by means of personal interviews.

Findings

The data analysis suggests that bank customer “intentions to switch banks” are affected by the level of their “price satisfaction”. “Price satisfaction” in turn is affected positively by “transparency”, “price quality ratio”, “relative price”, “reliability” and “price fairness”. In addition, “information search” exerts a positive impact on “price satisfaction”.

Originality/value

This study extends previous academic research, by analysing “price satisfaction” in depth, through its various dimensions and by examining the relationships between these variables and consumer switching intention. In addition, statistical evidence of these relationships and their synergies is provided.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 31 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 July 2006

Constantine Lymperopoulos, Ioannis E. Chaniotakis and Magdalini Soureli

This project aims to offer an in‐depth understanding of bank customers' buying behaviour in relation to the selection process, and provide bank managers with useful…

7938

Abstract

Purpose

This project aims to offer an in‐depth understanding of bank customers' buying behaviour in relation to the selection process, and provide bank managers with useful insight into the development of high quality relationships with customers.

Design/methodology/approach

The research involved a review of available literature on bank choice criteria, the fieldwork, the identification of factors that affect customers' choice, and the development of related managerial implications. A research questionnaire was administered by personal interviews to 1,092 bank customers in the greater area of Athens.

Findings

Four distinct factors were identified as the main choice criteria that influence consumers' bank choice. Bank service quality is the most important element that customers consider in order to select their mortgage providers and establish a long‐term relationship with them. The other three refer to product attributes, access, and communication.

Research limitations/implications

Limitations relate to the use of non‐probability sample and the restricted geographical area of the field research. This study contributes to the body of academic knowledge by shedding more light into the role of service quality in the selection process of mortgage provider.

Practical implications

An understanding of consumer buying behaviour with respect to mortgage loans is important to bank managers for the attainment of organisational objectives that are focused on building beneficial customer relationships. Management guidelines for improving service quality are presented.

Originality/value

The paper manages to identify the perceived important characteristics of banks and particularly highlight the role of service quality in bank selection for mortgages and further development of long‐term relationships.

Details

Managing Service Quality: An International Journal, vol. 16 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-4529

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 September 2008

Irini D. Rigopoulou, Ioannis E. Chaniotakis, Constantine Lymperopoulos and George I. Siomkos

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effect of after‐sales services on customers' satisfaction as well as on their behavioural intentions, namely “repurchase…

7041

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effect of after‐sales services on customers' satisfaction as well as on their behavioural intentions, namely “repurchase intention” and “word‐of‐mouth” (WOM).

Design/methodology/approach

The research conducted followed a quantitative methodology. The selected research tool was a questionnaire, which was administered via phone interviews using the CATI process. The study conducted was targeted to customers of a large retail chain marketing electrical appliances in Greece and 420 usable responses were utilised. A path analysis was performed using the “Amos 4.0” software.

Findings

After‐sales service quality affect satisfaction, which in turn affects behavioural intentions. Hence, after‐sales services affect the overall offering and thus, the quality of the relationship with customers.

Research limitations/implications

Limitations are related to the use of only two after‐sales services and the restricted geographical area of the field research.

Practical implications

An understanding of the effect of after‐sales services in satisfaction and post behavioural intentions is important to services marketing managers because it allows them to differentiate their offering substantially in a way that strengths the relationship with their clientele in the short, as well as in the long, run.

Originality/value

The paper manages to identify the effects of after‐sales service on satisfaction and behavioural intentions, especially in a dynamic retail sector where customers are highly involved. This study contributes to the body of academic knowledge by shedding more light into the role of after‐sales services to the overall offering provided.

Details

Managing Service Quality: An International Journal, vol. 18 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-4529

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 27 April 2012

Ram Herstein, Sigal Tifferet, José Luís Abrantes, Constantine Lymperopoulos, Tahir Albayrak and Meltem Caber

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the association between three personality traits (individualism, materialism and the “need for cognition”) and two…

2843

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the association between three personality traits (individualism, materialism and the “need for cognition”) and two characteristics of shoppers who buy private‐label brands (their predisposition to do so, and the importance they attach to the “brand dimensions”) across four member countries of the Union of the Mediterranean.

Design/methodology/approach

A questionnaire in the local language, using questions, items and scales adapted from previous studies, was completed by 683 undergraduate students. The scaled data were analysed by SPSS, and tested for internal reliability and equivalence.

Findings

Overall, the personality traits were significantly associated with both behavioural characteristics. Specifically, materialism and the need for cognition were linked to inclination to purchase private brands, and materialism and individualism to the perceived importance of brand dimensions. Cross‐cultural differences were found.

Originality/value

The demographic profile of the private‐brand consumer is well known, but not the behavioural profile. This study provides retail planners with valuable new marketing intelligence.

Details

Cross Cultural Management: An International Journal, vol. 19 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7606

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 20 July 2010

Constantine Lymperopoulos, Ioannis E. Chaniotakis and Irini D. Rigopoulou

The aim of this paper is to analyse the role of “trust” and “confidence/pessimism” in influencing consumer attitudes and buying intentions with respect to retail brands…

3529

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to analyse the role of “trust” and “confidence/pessimism” in influencing consumer attitudes and buying intentions with respect to retail brands and products.

Design/methodology/approach

Following a review of the relevant literature, the paper presents a conceptual model of buying intentions regarding retail brands. The model is then tested quantitatively by structural equation modelling analysis using a sample of 581 adult consumers that are decision makers in their households regarding purchases of detergent brands.

Findings

The results show that the consumers' degree of confidence/pessimism regarding their general economic situation and their trust in retail brands are directly influencing the perceived benefits and indirectly their attitudes; the later having a direct impact on their purchase intentions.

Research limitations/implications

Caution should be exercised in extrapolating the results from the present research context to other product categories and research settings.

Practical implications

The variables of “trust” and “confidence/pessimism” facilitate a more effective utilisation of the marketing mix with regard to retail brands.

Originality/value

The paper provides novel insights into consumer behaviour with regard to detergent retail brands. In particular, the variable of “confidence/pessimism” is especially relevant in the context of the prevailing adverse economic conditions.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 38 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 October 2005

Constantine Lymperopoulos and Ioannis E. Chaniotakis

This paper aims to identify the importance that branch employees of Greek banks attach to the internet as a tool of marketing intelligence, and the factors that affect its…

3515

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to identify the importance that branch employees of Greek banks attach to the internet as a tool of marketing intelligence, and the factors that affect its acceptance as such a tool.

Design/methodology/approach

Using the technology‐acceptance model (TAM) as a basis, a questionnaire is designed by the researchers, and completed by employees. Structural equation modelling (SEM) is used to analyse the data, and this confirms the relationships proposed by the TAM.

Findings

The main findings of the study are that: branch employees of Greek banks feel that a marketing‐intelligence system is a prerequisite for effectiveness in their work; although the internet is the fourth‐most important source of market intelligence for branch employees of Greek banks, they require greater access to the internet to meet their market‐intelligence needs; perceived usefulness and perceived ease of use of the internet directly affect bank employees' attitudes – which, in turn, affect the employees' intentions of using the internet as a marketing‐intelligence tool; and education and working experience affect employees' attitudes indirectly (through perceived usefulness).

Research limitations/implications

Main limitations of this study are related to the sampling method and the fact that the field research was conducted only in Athens, the capital of Greece.

Originality/value

Finally, the paper suggests how banks could exploit the internet as a marketing intelligence tool for their branch employees and what actions should be planned in order to facilitate its adoption.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 23 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2004

Constantine Lymperopoulos and Ioannis E. Chaniotakis

This paper aims to identify the potential effects of e‐banking through literature and surveys the Greek branch employees’ perceptions towards them. According to the…

3521

Abstract

This paper aims to identify the potential effects of e‐banking through literature and surveys the Greek branch employees’ perceptions towards them. According to the relevant literature review the 14 main implications of e‐banking adoption were identified. Based on these findings, a questionnaire was designed and completed by 527 branch employees. Data factor analysis revealed the existence of four distinct factors which were named banks’ “hard advantages”, “soft advantages”, “market effects”, and “risk”, whereas further analysis provided evidence of the relationship that exists among the perceptions, the personal characteristics of the respondents and the organisational characteristics of their banks.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 32 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

1 – 10 of 14