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Article
Publication date: 11 May 2015

Constance L Coogle and Myra G Owens

In recent years, Screening and Brief Intervention (SBI) has become increasingly available to older adults who engage in at-risk drinking behaviors. The results of SBI…

Abstract

Purpose

In recent years, Screening and Brief Intervention (SBI) has become increasingly available to older adults who engage in at-risk drinking behaviors. The results of SBI training sessions that targeted hospital-based healthcare providers, as well as mental health service providers in community-based clinics, are reported. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 93 participants attended SBI active learning training sessions. The responses of physicians/physicians in training about their intentions to apply the information in professional practice and their willingness to recommend the training to others in their profession were compared to practitioners in other professions.

Findings

Although there were no differences in terms of commitment to apply the information or level of comfort using the techniques, physicians/physicians in training were less interested in promoting the SBI training among their colleagues.

Research limitations/implications

The results are limited with respect to the number of training participants engaged and the geography entailed, yet implications for addressing barriers to widespread implementation and training challenges are explored.

Practical implications

Although it may be more difficult to promote SBI training in locations that do not primarily provide mental health services, hospitals, and other primary care settings are precisely where training may be most useful.

Social implications

The importance of training approaches to SBI that are disseminated within the context of a public health model of clinical preventive services is highlighted.

Originality/value

Original research is presented to highlight the need to improve training receptivity and facilitate the translation into practice.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

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