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Article
Publication date: 7 January 2014

Jill Mierke

This case study aims to explain why one Canadian academic library chose to design and deliver in-house leadership development training for its employees, rather than…

Abstract

Purpose

This case study aims to explain why one Canadian academic library chose to design and deliver in-house leadership development training for its employees, rather than taking a consortial approach, and seeks to highlight the impact of this decision on the library's organizational culture.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is presented in three parts: the benefits and challenges of in-house, external and consortial training; the impact of an in-house leadership development program at the University Library at the University of Saskatchewan; and considerations when deciding whether to collaborate on the provision of employee training. The author draws upon her own personal experiences as the Director of Human Resources for the library, and presents evidence acquired through surveys, observations, and conversations.

Findings

The paper explains how a deliberate decision to provide in-house leadership training had a transformative effect on individual employees and the organization.

Practical implications

When considering collaborating to provide leadership development training, library administrators should ensure the pros and cons of doing so are thoroughly explored; the pressure to collaborate can sometimes lead to participation in activities simply to be seen as a “good library citizen,” and often such activities are not necessarily contributing to the strategic goals of the library. In economically challenging times, library leaders and decision makers will need to be very aware of these implications.

Originality/value

This paper discusses why a library chose an in-house approach to leadership development training rather than a consortial approach. This article has value to library administrators as they consider implementing leadership development training in their libraries.

Details

Library Management, vol. 35 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 8 May 2017

Shaun Trujillo, Meghan Bergin, Margaret Jessup, Johanna Radding and Sarah Walden McGowan

This work aims to provide a report on adopting a consortial model of collaboration toward understanding digital preservation practice.

Abstract

Purpose

This work aims to provide a report on adopting a consortial model of collaboration toward understanding digital preservation practice.

Design/methodology/approach

This work provides a case study detailing the work and outcomes of a digital preservation pilot project undertaken by the Five College Libraries between 2014 and 2015.

Findings

Digital preservation is a broad endeavor and rapidly developing facet of digital collections and institutional repositories; yet, it is often an area that is not fully understood or implemented by many libraries and archives, largely because institutions lack the necessary resources to do it alone. Working across institutional lines provides a possible solution to overcoming resource limitations and general challenges for pursuing robust digital preservation programs.

Research limitations/implications

Findings reported in this work are based on a limited-scope pilot project. Several questions laid out during the pilot remain unanswered at its close.

Originality/value

This paper provides insight into an experimental process rarely reported in library and information science literature. The goal of the paper is to provide a reference point for institutions pursuing a consortial approach to the challenges of applied digital preservation practice.

Details

Digital Library Perspectives, vol. 33 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-5816

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2006

Maitrayee Ghosh, S.C. Biswas and V.K.J. Jeevan

The purpose of this paper is to review the state of libraries in India and summarise the strategic cooperative initiatives undertaken to improve user access to electronic…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to review the state of libraries in India and summarise the strategic cooperative initiatives undertaken to improve user access to electronic information services.

Design/methodology/approach

The methodology used included personal interview, e‐mail interaction and literature searches. Several strategies for retrieving information were used across both the professional and research literature [Library Literature, Library and Information Science Abstracts, and Educational Resources Information Center (ERIC)] and the Internet (Google). A variety of search terms were employed to gain a broad overview of the subject and then more targeted terms to examine key aspects of the area of study with greater specificity. The paper also examines a range of general environmental factors impacting on libraries and which must be taken into account to accelerate the pace of beneficial change. It also lists the significant achievements in this field to date.

Findings

There are still significant potentials for further implementation of cooperative strategies to enhance networked, electronic information service delivery in India. This paper discusses some of the underlying issues which are presumably delaying the establishment of consortia and which need to be resolved.

Research limitations/implications

This area of study is extremely fast moving and regular updating and continuation of this research is required to maintain a grasp of the situation.

Practical implications

The negative factors outlined in this paper which militate against the full successful impact of cooperative strategies are clearly set out, in order to help library managers and administrators create practical solutions capable of eliminating these obstacles to progress.

Originality/value

This research gives an insight into how consortial strategies can help overcome the resource constraints which characterise library provision in many developing countries, providing a model for other library systems, which face similar problems, to follow.

Details

Library Review, vol. 55 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 10 November 2014

JoAnne Sparks, Grace Saw and Mary Davies

陰陽 (yinyáng in Pinyin) is about interconnectedness rather than opposites. The purpose of this paper is to highlight how collaboration connects and strengthens the efforts…

Abstract

Purpose

陰陽 (yinyáng in Pinyin) is about interconnectedness rather than opposites. The purpose of this paper is to highlight how collaboration connects and strengthens the efforts across the sector and reinforces how the sum of the parts is greater than any one university alone. This paper shares the experience of conducting a collaborative project with three universities. It illustrates the fine balancing act of collaboration (yin) with competition (yang) amongst three of Australia ' s higher education institutions at a national level, with the aim of contributing to the career development of professionals in the fields of library services and eResearch.

Design/methodology/approach

Bond University, University of Western Australia and Griffith University have collaborated to develop a career mapping toolkit which builds on an earlier commissioned project completed by Council of Australian IT Directors (CAUDIT) focusing on enterprise information technology roles. This tri-institutional collaborative project reviews in detail the skills, knowledge and abilities of library and eResearch management roles in the respective organisations.

Findings

This project has been hugely rewarding for the initial three project partners who worked and collaborated well together, successfully completing project goals within agreed timeframes. Looking forward, career pathing will become more widespread as managers receive the requisite training, take ownership of these activities and grow to fully realise the value and potential of active career management to team performance. Ultimately, the use of the career pathing toolkit will enhance career satisfaction of the individual which in turn will lift the productivity of the organisational unit.

Research limitations/implications

To ensure the ongoing viability of the career pathing toolkit, it is necessary to measure its relevance and effectiveness: each institution is confident in adopting/modifying the final product for internal use. This demonstrates confidence in the quality of the work produced by the other collaborators; adoption of the product by institutions which were not part of the initial collaboration; and willingness of another institution (not originally involved) to join the collaborative project and make a contribution.

Practical implications

The catalyst for collaboration between the three universities was realised when the authors saw an opportunity to address the important and pressing issue of career and workforce planning as a partnership project. The main objective for collaboration was to achieve a more comprehensive and speedier project outcome.

Social implications

This paper shares the outcomes of the project which illustrates the fine balancing act of collaboration (yin) with competition (yang) amongst three of Australia ' s higher education institutions at a national level, with the aim of contributing to the career development of professionals in the fields of library and eResearch.

Originality/value

The aim is to develop a toolkit that: catalogues and maps the core professional roles needed in the next two to three years in the respective institutions; and specifies the knowledge and experience required in each core professional area including where there is overlap. In essence, the career map provides a toolkit for identifying the knowledge areas and skills, abilities and competencies required for each core area (organised by career streams) and professional role.

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2001

Tony Hooper

This paper takes a superficial look at the technologies that are impacting society to create a series of discontinuous social changes. These impacts are affecting all…

Abstract

This paper takes a superficial look at the technologies that are impacting society to create a series of discontinuous social changes. These impacts are affecting all social institutions and giving rise to a phenomenon called The New Economy. After discussing some of the New Economy thinking and the expectations people have of businesses and management, conclusions are drawn about the management issues that will increasingly determine the services and style of libraries in the Information Age.

Details

The Electronic Library, vol. 19 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 17 February 2012

Margaret Bean, Heidi Nance and Linda Frederiksen

This paper aims to describe the international interlibrary loan (ILL) experience of three academic libraries in the Pacific Northwest and analyze factors impacting the…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to describe the international interlibrary loan (ILL) experience of three academic libraries in the Pacific Northwest and analyze factors impacting the success of international ILL. The authors seek to speculate on three possible scenarios going forward and conclude with a call to action.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors apply PEST and SWOT techniques, using their own institutions as case studies.

Findings

Some of the most critical factors affecting international ILL at their home institutions include the terms of electronic license agreements, open access, and physical delivery costs.

Originality/value

The internal and external factors affecting international ILL at these institutions are broadly applicable to all types of libraries throughout the world.

Details

Interlending & Document Supply, vol. 40 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-1615

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2000

Ya‐ning Chen

It is a tradition in libraries to offer scholarly materials for supporting research and education. In the digital age, it becomes both a challenging issue and an…

Abstract

It is a tradition in libraries to offer scholarly materials for supporting research and education. In the digital age, it becomes both a challenging issue and an opportunity for libraries to provide electronic resources ofscholarly materials in networked environments. Owing to slow network traffic speed and traffic jams resulting from connection between the Internet and the Taiwan Academic Network, Academia Sinica has introduced a great number of electronic databases to its end users by applying mirroring technology. Academia Sinica also cooperates with other organisations and consortia in Taiwan to set up a new resource sharing paradigm for libraries. This case has so far proven to be a workable and practical solution with consortia’s support and coordination. Consequently the information providers and agents also get the expected profit under reasonable, affordable, and profitable principles.

Details

Library Consortium Management: An International Journal, vol. 2 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1466-2760

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2002

Reason Baathuli Nfila and Kwasi Darko‐Ampem

Traces the term “library consortium” as a form of co‐operation among libraries. Focuses on reasons for forming consortia and types, ranging from highly decentralised to…

Abstract

Traces the term “library consortium” as a form of co‐operation among libraries. Focuses on reasons for forming consortia and types, ranging from highly decentralised to highly centralised. Literature on consortia is mostly reported in four sources. Highlights the formation of the International Association of Library Consortia in 1997. The current trend is one of sharing integrated library systems and computer databases, collection development, purchasing of electronic journals, and staff development. What has been achieved is the provision of resources to patrons that did not have them before the consortia, as well as increased levels of services and convenience of patrons. By libraries banding together, cost savings come through reduced cost per unit as the group of libraries in the consortium shares the expenditure.

Details

Library Management, vol. 23 no. 4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 13 February 2009

Golnessa Galyani Moghaddam and V.G. Talawar

The purpose of this paper is to review consortia efforts in developing countries.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to review consortia efforts in developing countries.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper reviews the literature on library consortia in developing countries in general and India in particular. The paper also outlines the advantages and disadvantages of consortia.

Findings

“Library consortia” refers to co‐operation, co‐ordination and collaboration between, and among, libraries for the purpose of sharing information resources. Libraries in developing countries have been working on consortia at national, regional and international level. However, some barriers such as poor technological and communication infrastructure, inadequate finances, culture and context, attitudes toward consortia and multiple efforts are reported to be limitations of consortia activities in developing countries.

Originality and value

The paper provides a useful overview of consortia in developing countries, particularly in India.

Details

Program, vol. 43 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0033-0337

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1999

Jim Dwyer

The California State University System (CSU) utilizes a cooperative buying program to provide a wide range of electronic resources at the lowest negotiable prices. The…

Abstract

The California State University System (CSU) utilizes a cooperative buying program to provide a wide range of electronic resources at the lowest negotiable prices. The System’s Electronic Access to Information Committee (EAR) surveys campus needs, identifies and reviews resources, and makes recommendations for purchase. The CSU Software and Electronic Information Resources Office arranges product demonstrations and negotiates contracts. This paper reviews the history and operations of EAR and SEIR, the Principles for the Acquisition of Electronic Information Resources, and the Criteria and Recommendations for an Initial Core Collection. The advantages, disadvantages, and future of this approach will also be considered.

Details

The Bottom Line, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0888-045X

Keywords

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